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Michigan State University

Native American Studies Research Guide: Statistics

Contents

A compilation of statistical resources related to Native Americans.

Proquest Statistical Insight

ProQuest Statistical Insight. 1973-present. Provides abstracting, indexing, and full text for publications from hundreds of public domain and licensed sources. Institutions can subscribe to the entire collection or to selected modules.

We the First Americans

We the First Americans (Census Bureau, 1989)

Statistical Reference Works

Michigan Data (Also see Michigan's Native American Heritage).

Learn about what is happening in Michigan reservations and trust lands by clicking on a link below! (No data available for Match-e-be-nash-she-wish Band of Pottawatomi and Ontonagon.)

Each fact sheet will break down the reservation/trust land by population, race, health insurance, poverty, education, government assistance and median wages by gender.

Bay Mills | Grand Traverse | Hannahville Indian Community | Huron Potawatomi | IsabellaLac Vieux Desert | L’Anse | Little River | Little Traverse Bay | Pokagon | Sault Ste. Marie

National Data.

American Indian and Alaskan Native (AIAN) Data and Links.  Census Bureau.

American Indian and Native Alaskan Populations : 2010.  According to the 2010 Census, 5.2 million people in the United States identified as American Indian and Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more other races. Out of this total, 2.9 million people identified as American Indian and Alaska Native alone. U.S. Bureau.of the Census.

American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes in the United States and Puerto Rico: 2010  U.S. Bureau of the Census.  This set of 66 statistical tables shows the numeric distribution of the American Indian and Alaska Native population by tribe from the 2010 Census.  Includes tables for the nation, regions, divisions, states, and Puerto Rico.

American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States. United States. Bureau of the Census. Geography Division.  Washingon, D.C.: U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, Bureau of the Census, Geography Division, 2010.

2013 American Indian Population and Labor Force Report. U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of the Secretary, Office of the Assistant Secretary – Indian Affairs, January 16, 2014.  Earlier populaton and labor force reports are also available.

American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month : Facts for Features.  U.S. Bureau of the Census.

Health of American Indian or Alaska Native Population (FastStats).  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Nations Within a Nation : Historical Statistics of American Indians / Paul Stuart.  New York : Greenwood Press, c1987.  251pp.  Main Library E77 .S924 1987 : Professor Stuart has provided a unique research and reference tool covering a wide range of topics relating to Indian history. In his introduction Stuart discusses the scope and purpose of the volume and describes the difficulties involved in obtaining accurate and comprehensive information on Indian affairs, especially prior to the twentieth century. Each chapter assesses the historical significance of the available data and supplies statistical information in table form as well as suggestions on further reading and other avenues of research. Chapter topics include land base and climate, population, removal and relocation, urbanization, vital statistics, health, education, employment, income, resources and economic development, and the activities of the federal government.

Native North American Languages Spoken at Home in the United States and Puerto Rico: 2006-2010 (December 2011)

The Native population of the Americas in 1492 / edited by William M. DenevanMadison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press ; 1976.  1st edition, 353pp. Main Library E59.P75 N37 ; Note : The second edition, 1992, is available online from the ACLS Humanities E-Book Collection and from our eBrary Academic Complete and EBSCO EBook Academic Collections. :   Research by some scholars provides population estimates of the pre-contact Americas as high as 112 million in 1492, while others estimate the population to have been as low as eight million. In any case, the native population declined to less than five million by 1650. In this collection of essays, historians, anthropologists and historical demographers discuss the discrepancies in the population estimates and the evidence for the post-European decline. Woodrow Borah, Angel Rosenblat and William T. Sanders, among others, examine such topics as the Indian slave trade, disease, military action and the disruption of the social systems of the native peoples. Offering varying points of view, the contributions critically analyse major hemispheric and regional data and estimates for pre- and post-European contact.   

Statistical Record of Native North Americans. Detroit, MI : Gale Research, Inc., c1993-c1995.  Main Library E98.P76 S76 : A compilation of statistical data on the indigenous population of North America, covering Native North Americans as compared with other racial/ethnic groups under many specific subject headings; Native North Americans as compared with one another (e.g., by reservation, by tribe, by sex, by age, etc.); and individual tribal data under rare circumstances (e.g., historical data on the Yani tribe). The period covered extends from 20th century estimates of pre-European contact populations to population projections for 2040. Organization is by chapter and topic. There are 12 chapters on broad subjects such as history, demographics, and the family. Within these chapters, data are organized by topics. Canadian data are presented in a separate chapter. A single keyword index refers to subjects, concepts, institutions, and organizations.

The five civilized tribes in Indian territory: the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek, and Seminole nations. U.S. Department of the Interior, Census Bureau.   Washington, United States Census Printing Office, 1894.  70pp.  Government Documents Library Microfiche Collection (3 West) CIS US Exec MF I1207-1 Microfiche  (Available in print in the Library of Michigan Rare Book Room)

Indian population in the United States and Alaska. 1910Washington, Govt. Print. Off., 1915.  285pp.  U.S. Government Documents Collection (3 West)   C 3.2:In 2/3/910   (Also available via Hathitrust)

We the First Americans.  Washington, D.C. : Bureau of the Census, 1989.  28pp.  U.S. Government Documents Collection (3 West) C 3.2:Am 3/9     A compilation of statistical data on the indigenous population of North America, covering Native North Americans as compared with other racial/ethnic groups under many specific subject headings; Native North Americans as compared with one another (e.g., by reservation, by tribe, by sex, by age, etc.); and individual tribal data under rare circumstances (e.g., historical data on the Yani tribe). The period covered extends from 20th century estimates of pre-European contact populations to population projections for 2040. Organization is by chapter and topic. There are 12 chapters on broad subjects such as history, demographics, and the family. Within these chapters, data are organized by topics. Canadian data are presented in a separate chapter. A single keyword index refers to subjects, concepts, institutions, and organizations.  Note: It wasn’t until 1960, with the introduction of racial self-identification, that Native Americans were empowered to report their own identity. Since then, the reported population of Native Americans in the United States has increased dramatically. In 2000, for the first time ever, the census permitted individuals to select more than one racial category. 

We the People : American Indians and Native Alaskan PopulationsThis report provides a portrait of the American Indian and Alaska Native population in the United States and discusses the largest specified tribal groupings, reservations, Alaska Native village statistical areas (ANVSAs), and areas outside reservations and ANVSAs (outside tribal areas) at the national level. It is part of the Census 2000 Special Reports series that presents demographic, social, and economic characteristics collected from Census 2000.  Census 2000 Special Report.  Feb. 2006.

Statistical Handbook on Racial Groups in the United States / by Tim B. Heaton, Bruce A. Chadwick, and Cardell K. JacobsonPhoenix, Ariz. : Oryx Press, 2000. 355pp.  Main Library E184.A1 H417 2000  : As the shift in racial and ethnic composition of the United States continues, students, researchers, and others will find it important to understand the differences between--and similarities among--racial groups. This volume compiles a broad range of statistical data on important topics across various racial groups. Gathered from authoritative sources, this information offers statistical comparisons on timely subjects, including: educational goals, attitudes about employment, leisure pursuits, marital happiness, attitudes about contraception, religious beliefs, arrest rates, and political party preferences.

We the People: An Atlas of America's Ethnic Diversity. Maps showing the geographical distribution of 44 ethnic and racial groups in the United States are presented. Maps are also included showing internal migration by ethnic group and refugee settlement, the distribution of ethnic groups in 1920, and the distribution of the North American Indian population. Data are primarily from the 1980 census. Statistical data are also presented in tabular form concerning the population of each U.S. county by ethnic group for 1980. Excellent demographic maps and statistical information.  MSU Map Library (3 West) (Supersize Atlas Case) G1201.E1 A4 1988

Social and Economic Change on American Indian Reservations: A Databook of the US Censuses and the American Community Survey 1990 – 2010Randall K.Q. Akee & Jonathan B. Taylor.  May 15, 2014.  The fortunes of Indians on reservations continue to lag those of other racial and ethnic groups tracked by the census in the United States. The per capita income of Indians on reservations, for example, has been less than half the US average, consistently falling far below that of Hispanics, African Americans, Asian Americans, and Indians living elsewhere. Nonetheless, in recent decades, tribes have made progress in income growth and other measures. This databook—research made possible with funding from the Sycuan Institute on Tribal Gaming—documents how and where change has taken place.

For more possibilities, search the MSU Library online catalog, MelCat, or WorldCat with the following subjects:

Indians of North America--Statistics

Subject Guide

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