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Michigan State University

Native American Studies Research Guide: New Books

Contents

A compilation of recent Native American acquisitions by the MSU Libraries.

General Tips and Advice

  • Check the MSU Online Catalog for books, videos, and more.  Note that the MSU Online Catalog is a union catalog which includes the holdings of the Library of Michigan, the MSU College of Law Library, and other branches on our own campus.

  • Do a wider search using MelCat (a  network of participating Michigan libraries) or WorldCat (searches thousands of libraries). You can request non-MSU Library materials through interlibrary loan. NOTE: Not all materials listed in MelCat or WorldCat can be borrowed through interlibrary loan, but many can.

  • Don't forget to use the bibliographies in reference works, books, and articles to identify other resources on your topic.

Book Covers, A-C


1491 : New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus

1491 : New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus


American Indian autobiography

American Indian autobiography


American Indian education : counternarratives in racism, struggle, and the law

American Indian education : counternarratives in racism, struggle, and the law


American Indian History : a Documentary Reader

American Indian History : a Documentary Reader


American Indians / American Presidents : a History / edited by Clifford E. Trafzer. [New York] : Harper, c2009.

American Indians / American Presidents : a History


American Indians in British art, 1700-1840

American Indians in British art, 1700-1840


Ancient peoples of the American Southwest

Ancient peoples of the American Southwest


The Ancient Southwest : Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde

The Ancient Southwest : Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde


The archaeology of native-lived colonialism : challenging history in the Great Lakes

The archaeology of native-lived colonialism : challenging history in the Great Lakes


Archaic Societies : Diversity and Complexity Across the Midcontinent

Archaic Societies : Diversity and Complexity Across the Midcontinent


Art from Fort Marion : the Silberman collection

Art from Fort Marion : the Silberman collection


Art of the Cherokee : prehistory to the present

Art of the Cherokee : prehistory to the present


The art of tradition : sacred music, dance, and myth of Michigan's Anishinaabe, 1946-1955

The art of tradition : sacred music, dance, and myth of Michigan's Anishinaabe, 1946-1955


Battles of the Red River War : archeological perspectives on the Indian campaign of 1874

Battles of the Red River War : archeological perspectives on the Indian campaign of 1874


Beloved women : the political lives of LaDonna Harris and Wilma Mankiller

Beloved women : the political lives of LaDonna Harris and Wilma Mankiller


The Betrayal of Faith : the Tragic Journey of a Colonial Native Convert / Emma Anderson. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, c2007.

The Betrayal of Faith : the Tragic Journey of a Colonial Native Convert


Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism since 1900

Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism since 1900


Big Chief Elizabeth : The Adventures and Fate of the First English Colonists in America

Big Chief Elizabeth : The Adventures and Fate of the First English Colonists in America


Black Hawk : the battle for the heart of America

Black Hawk : the battle for the heart of America


The Black Hawk War of 1832

The Black Hawk War of 1832


Blackfoot war art : pictographs of the reservation period, 1880-2000

Blackfoot war art : pictographs of the reservation period, 1880-2000


Blood and thunder : an epic of the American West

Blood and thunder : an epic of the American West


Blood struggle : the rise of modern Indian nations

Blood struggle : the rise of modern Indian nations


Bloody Mohawk : the French and Indian War & American revolution on New York's frontier

Bloody Mohawk : the French and Indian War & American revolution on New York's frontier


The Blue Tattoo : the Life of Olive Oatman / Margot Mifflin. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.

The Blue Tattoo : the Life of Olive Oatman


The boundaries between us : natives and newcomers along the frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850

The boundaries between us : natives and newcomers along the frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850


Broken Landscape : Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution / Frank Pommersheim. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press,

Broken Landscape : Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution


Broken Treaties : United States and Canadian Relations with the Lakotas and the Plains Cree, 1868-1885

Broken Treaties : United States and Canadian Relations with the Lakotas and the Plains Cree, 1868-1885


Bury my heart at Wounded Knee : an Indian history of the American West

Bury my heart at Wounded Knee : an Indian history of the American West


Canyon gardens : the Ancient Pueblo landscapes of the American Southwest

Canyon gardens : the Ancient Pueblo landscapes of the American Southwest


Captive Arizona, 1851-1900

Captive Arizona, 1851-1900


Carlisle vs. Army : Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Pop Warner, and the forgotten story of football's greatest battle

Carlisle vs. Army : Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Pop Warner, and the forgotten story of football's greatest battle


Catlin's Lament : Indians, Manifest Destiny, and the Ethics of Nature

Catlin's Lament : Indians, Manifest Destiny, and the Ethics of Nature


Celluloid Indians : Native Americans and film

Celluloid Indians : Native Americans and film


The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears


The Cherokee nation in the Civil War

The Cherokee nation in the Civil War


Chickasaw lives

Chickasaw lives


Chickasaw : unconquered and unconquerable

Chickasaw : unconquered and unconquerable


Chief Bender's burden : the silent struggle of a baseball star

Chief Bender's burden : the silent struggle of a baseball star


Comanche Empire

Comanche Empire


Competing Voices from Native America / Dewi Ioan Ball and Joy Porter. Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood Press, 2009.

Competing Voices from Native America


Constructing lives at Mission San Francisco : native Californians and Hispanic colonists, 1776-1821

Constructing lives at Mission San Francisco : native Californians and Hispanic colonists, 1776-1821


Contesting Knowledge : Museums and Indigenous Perspectives

Contesting Knowledge : Museums and Indigenous Perspectives


Crazy Horse : a Lakota life

Crazy Horse : a Lakota life


Criminal Justice in Native America

Criminal Justice in Native America


Book Covers, D-H


Daughters of mother earth : the wisdom of Native American women

Daughters of mother earth : the wisdom of Native American women


Documents of Native American Political Development : 1500s to 1933

Documents of Native American Political Development : 1500s to 1933


Dog Soldier Justice : the Ordeal of Susanna Alderdice in the Kansas Indian War / Jeff Broome ; foreword to the Bison Books edition by John H. Monnett ; with a new preface by the author. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.

Dog Soldier Justice : the Ordeal of Susanna Alderdice in the Kansas Indian War


Dream songs and ceremony : reflections on traditional California Indian dance

Dream songs and ceremony : reflections on traditional California Indian dance


Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country / Marsha Weisiger. Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2009.

Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country


The earth shall weep : a history of Native America

The earth shall weep : a history of Native America


Edmund Pickens (Okchantubby) : first elected Chickasaw Chief, his life and times

Edmund Pickens (Okchantubby) : first elected Chickasaw Chief, his life and times


Empowerment of North American Indian girls : ritual expressions at puberty

Empowerment of North American Indian girls : ritual expressions at puberty


Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong

Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong


Exiles and pioneers : eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West

Exiles and pioneers : eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West


Faces From the Land : Twenty Years of Powwow Tradition

Faces From the Land : Twenty Years of Powwow Tradition


Facing East from Indian country : a Native history of early America

Facing East from Indian country : a Native history of early America


Facing the future : the Indian Child Welfare Act at 30

Facing the future : the Indian Child Welfare Act at 30


Fellow travelers : Indians and Europeans contesting the early American trail

Fellow travelers : Indians and Europeans contesting the early American trail


Fire light : the life of Angel De Cora, Winnebago artist

Fire light : the life of Angel De Cora, Winnebago artist


First Peoples in a New World : Colonizing Ice Age America

First Peoples in a New World : Colonizing Ice Age America


Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 Years Ago

Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 Years Ago


Frontier forts of Iowa : Indians, traders, and soldiers, 1682-1862

Frontier forts of Iowa : Indians, traders, and soldiers, 1682-1862


Furs and frontiers in the far north  : the contest among native and foreign nations for the Bering Strait fur trade

Furs and frontiers in the far north  : the contest among native and foreign nations for the Bering Strait fur trade


Gall : Lakota war chief

Gall : Lakota war chief


Gathering native scholars : UCLA's forty years of American Indian culture and research

Gathering native scholars : UCLA's forty years of American Indian culture and research


Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance During the Early Reservation Years, 1850-1900

Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance During the Early Reservation Years, 1850-1900


The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand : Roanoke's Forgotten Indians

The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand : Roanoke's Forgotten Indians


The historical atlas of Native Americans

The historical atlas of Native Americans


A History of the Ancient Southwest

A History of the Ancient Southwest


Hollywood's Indian : the portrayal of the Native American in film

Hollywood's Indian : the portrayal of the Native American in film


Honoring Elders : Aging, Authority, and Ojibwe Religion / Michael D. McNally. New York : Columbia University Press, c2009.

Honoring Elders : Aging, Authority, and Ojibwe Religion


How the Indians lost their land : law and power on the frontier

How the Indians lost their land : law and power on the frontier


Book Covers, N-O


The Natchez Indians : a history to 1735

The Natchez Indians : a history to 1735


A nation of women : gender and colonial encounters among the Delaware Indians

A nation of women : gender and colonial encounters among the Delaware Indians


Native activism in Cold War America : the struggle for sovereignty

Native activism in Cold War America : the struggle for sovereignty


Native America from prehistory to first contact

Native America from prehistory to first contact


Native American Clothing : an Illustrated HistoryNative American Folktales

Native American Clothing : an Illustrated History


Native American Folktales

Native American Folktales


Native American language ideologies : beliefs, practices, and struggles in Indian country

Native American language ideologies : beliefs, practices, and struggles in Indian country


Native American studies

Native American studies


Native American Testimony : a Chronicle of Indian-White Relations From Prophecy to the Present, 1492-2000 

Native American Testimony : a Chronicle of Indian-White Relations From Prophecy to the Present, 1492-2000


Native Americans and Anglo-American culture, 1750-1850 : the Indian Atlantic

Native Americans and Anglo-American culture, 1750-1850 : the Indian Atlantic


Native Americans in Comic Books : A Critical Study

Native Americans in Comic Books : A Critical Study


Native insurgencies and the genocidal impulse in the Americas

Native insurgencies and the genocidal impulse in the Americas


Native Liberty : Natural Reason and Cultural Survivance / Gerald Vizenor. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2009

Native Liberty : Natural Reason and Cultural Survivance


Native North American religious traditions : dancing for life

Native North American religious traditions : dancing for life


The Native population of the Americas in 1492

The Native population of the Americas in 1492


Native speakers : Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the poetics of culture

Native speakers : Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the poetics of culture


Natives and academics : researching and writing about American Indians

Natives and academics : researching and writing about American Indians


The Nature Way

The Nature Way


Negotiators of change : historical perspectives on Native American women

Negotiators of change : historical perspectives on Native American women


Never give up! : the life of Pearl Carter Scott

Never give up! : the life of Pearl Carter Scott


A New Deal for Native art : Indian Arts and Federal Policy, 1933-1943

A New Deal for Native art : Indian Arts and Federal Policy, 1933-1943


New Indians, old wars

New Indians, old wars


A new world : England's first view of America

A new world : England's first view of America


The Nez Perces in the Indian territory : Nimiipuu survival

The Nez Perces in the Indian territory : Nimiipuu survival


Nicholas Black Elk : Medicine Man, Missionary, Mystic 

Nicholas Black Elk : Medicine Man, Missionary, Mystic


North American Indians in the Great War

North American Indians in the Great War


Oh what a slaughter : massacres in the American West, 1846-1890

Oh what a slaughter : massacres in the American West, 1846-1890


One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark

One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark


Our Knowledge is Not Primitive : Decolonizing Botanical Anishinaabe Teachings / Wendy Makoons Geniusz ; illustrations by Annmarie Geniusz. Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2009.

Our Knowledge is Not Primitive : Decolonizing Botanical Anishinaabe Teachings


Our savage neighbors : how Indian war transformed early America

Our savage neighbors : how Indian war transformed early America

Book Covers, P-S


Painting the native world : life, land, and animals

Painting the native world : life, land, and animals


Peace came in the form of a woman : Indians and Spaniards in the Texas borderlands

Peace came in the form of a woman : Indians and Spaniards in the Texas borderlands


Peace, Power, Righteousness : An Indigenous Manifesto

Peace, Power, Righteousness : An Indigenous Manifesto


Peaceable kingdom lost : the Paxton Boys and the destruction of William Penn's holy experiment

Peaceable kingdom lost : the Paxton Boys and the destruction of William Penn's holy experiment


Peoples of the river valleys : the odyssey of the Delaware Indians

Peoples of the river valleys : the odyssey of the Delaware Indians


Pocahontas and the Powhatan dilemma : an American portrait

Pocahontas and the Powhatan dilemma : an American portrait


Pre-removal Choctaw history : exploring new paths

Pre-removal Choctaw history : exploring new paths


Private women, public lives : gender and the missions of the Californias

Private women, public lives : gender and the missions of the Californias


Puebloan ruins of the Southwest 

Puebloan ruins of the Southwest


Pueblos, Spaniards, and the kingdom of New Mexico

Pueblos, Spaniards, and the kingdom of New Mexicot


Race and the Cherokee Nation : sovereignty in the nineteenth century

Race and the Cherokee Nation : sovereignty in the nineteenth century


Racism in Indian Country

Racism in Indian Country


The real all Americans : the team that changed a game, a people, a nation

The real all Americans : the team that changed a game, a people, a nation


Rebuilding Native nations : strategies for governance and development

Rebuilding Native nations : strategies for governance and development


Reconfigurations of Native North America : an Anthology of New Perspectives / edited by John R. Wunder and Kurt E. Kinbacher ; foreword by Markku Henriksson. Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University Press, c2009.

Reconfigurations of Native North America : an Anthology of New Perspectives


Recovering the sacred : the power of naming and claiming

Recovering the sacred : the power of naming and claiming


Religion and healing in Native America : pathways for renewal

Religion and healing in Native America : pathways for renewal


Restoring the balance : First Nations women, community, and culture

Restoring the balance : First Nations women, community, and culture


Rethinking the Fur Trade : Cultures of Exchange in an Atlantic World

Rethinking the Fur Trade : Cultures of Exchange in an Atlantic World


Revolutionary negotiations : Indians, empires, and diplomats in the founding of America

Revolutionary negotiations : Indians, empires, and diplomats in the founding of America


The rise and fall of Indian country, 1825-1855

The rise and fall of Indian country, 1825-1855


The River Indians : Mohicans making history

The River Indians : Mohicans making history


Savages and Scoundrels : the Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory / Paul VanDevelder. New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, c2009.

Savages and Scoundrels : the Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory


The scratch of a pen : 1763 and the transformation of North America

The scratch of a pen : 1763 and the transformation of North America


Self-determination : the other path for Native Americans

Self-determination : the other path for Native Americans


Selling your father's bones : America's 140-year war against the Nez Perce Tribe

Selling your father's bones : America's 140-year war against the Nez Perce Tribe


The Seminole freedmen : a history

The Seminole freedmen : a history


Serving Their Country : American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century

Serving Their Country : American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century


Shadows at dawn : an Apache massacre and the violence of history

Shadows at dawn : an Apache massacre and the violence of history


The Shawnees and the war for America

The Shawnees and the war for America


The Shawnees and their neighbors, 1795-1870

The Shawnees and their neighbors, 1795-1870


Shoshonean peoples and the overland trails : frontiers of the Utah Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1849-1869

Shoshonean peoples and the overland trails : frontiers of the Utah Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1849-1869


Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull


A song for the horse nation : horses in Native American cultures

A song for the horse nation : horses in Native American cultures


A sorrow in our heart : the life of Tecumseh

A sorrow in our heart : the life of Tecumseh


Sovereignty, separatism, and survivance : ideological encounters in the literature of Native North America

Sovereignty, separatism, and survivance : ideological encounters in the literature of Native North America


Speak like singing : classics of Native American literature

Speak like singing : classics of Native American literature


Spirits of the Air : Birds & American Indians in the South

Spirits of the Air : Birds & American Indians in the South


Stealing Indian women : native slavery in the Illinois Country

Stealing Indian women : native slavery in the Illinois Country


"Strong Medicine speaks" : a Native American elder has her say : an oral history

Strong Medicine speaks : a Native American elder has her say : an oral history


Subjects unto the same king : Indians, English, and the contest for authority in colonial New England

Subjects unto the same king : Indians, English, and the contest for authority in colonial New England


Survivance : narratives of Native presence

Survivance : narratives of Native presence


Featured Books, A-B

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check online catalog for latest information on location and status.

1491 : New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus / Charles C. MannNew York : Knopf, 2005.  465pp. Main Library E61 .M266 2005 : Mann shows how a new generation of researchers equipped with novel scientific techniques have come to previously unheard-of conclusions about the Americas before the arrival of the Europeans: In 1491 there were probably more people living in the Americas than in Europe. Certain cities--such as Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital--were greater in population than any European city. Tenochtitlán, unlike any capital in Europe at that time, had running water, beautiful botanical gardens, and immaculately clean streets. The earliest cities in the Western Hemisphere were thriving before the Egyptians built the great pyramids. Native Americans transformed their land so completely that Europeans arrived in a hemisphere already massively "landscaped" by human beings. Pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico developed corn by a breeding process that the journal Science recently described as "man's first, and perhaps the greatest, feat of genetic engineering."  Mann is well aware that much of the history he relates is necessarily speculative, the product of pot-shard interpretation and precise scientific measurements that often end up being radically revised in later decades. But the most compelling of his eye-opening revisionist stories are among the best-founded: the stories of early American-European contact. To many of those who were there, the earliest encounters felt more like a meeting of equals than one of natural domination. And those who came later and found an emptied landscape that seemed ripe for the taking, Mann argues convincingly, encountered not the natural and unchanging state of the native American, but the evidence of a sudden calamity: the ravages of what was likely the greatest epidemic in human history, the smallpox and other diseases introduced inadvertently by Europeans to a population without immunity, which swept through the Americas faster than the explorers who brought it, and left behind for their discovery a land that held only a shadow of the thriving cultures that it had sustained for centuries before.

American Indian autobiography / H. David Brumble, III ; with a new introduction by the author.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.  278pp.  Main Library E89.5 .B78 2008 : American Indian Autobiography is a kind of cultural kaleidoscope whose narratives come to us from a wide range of American Indians: warriors, farmers, Christian converts, rebels and assimilationists, peyotists, shamans, hunters, Sun Dancers, artists and Hollywood Indians, spiritualists, visionaries, mothers, fathers, and English professors. Many of these narratives are as-told-to autobiographies, and those who labored to set them down in writing are nearly as diverse as their subjects. Black Elk had a poet for his amanuensis; Maxidiwiac, a Hidatsa farmer who worked her fields with a bone-blade hoe, had an anthropologist. Two Leggings, the man who led the last Crow war party, speaks to us through a merchant from Bismarck, North Dakota. White Horse Eagle, an aged Osage, told his story to a Nazi historian....By discussing these remarkable narratives from a historical perspective, H. David Brumble III reveals how the various editors’ assumptions and methods influenced the autobiographies as well as the autobiographers. Brumble also—and perhaps most importantly—describes the various oral autobiographical traditions of the Indians themselves, including those of N. Scott Momaday and Leslie Marmon Silko. American Indian Autobiography includes an extensive bibliography; this Bison Books edition features a new introduction by the author.

American Indian education : counternarratives in racism, struggle, and the law / Matthew L.M. Fletcher. New York : Routledge, 2008.  223pp. Main Library and Faculty Collection (1 West) E97 .F55 2008 : America Indian culture and traditions have survived an unusual amount of oppressive federal and state educational policies intended to assimilate Indian people and destroy their cultures and languages. Yet, Indian culture, traditions, and people often continue to be treated as objects in the classroom and in the curriculum. Using a critical race theory framework and a unique "counternarrative" methodology, American Indian Education explores a host of modern educational issues facing American Indian peoples—from the impact of Indian sports mascots on students and communities, to the uses and abuses of law that often never reach a courtroom, and the intergenerational impacts of American Indian education policy on Indian children today. By interweaving empirical research with accessible composite narratives, Matthew Fletcher breaches the gap between solid educational policy and the on-the-ground reality of Indian students, highlighting the challenges faced by American Indian students and paving the way for an honest discussion about solutions.

American Indian History : a Documentary Reader / edited by Camilla Townsend.  Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.  247pp.  Main Library E77 .A4963 2009 : This Reader from the Uncovering the Past  series provides a comprehensive introduction to American Indian history.

  • Over 60 primary documents allow the voices of natives to illuminate the American past
  • Includes samples of native languages just above the full translations of particular texts
  • Provides comprehensive introductions and headnotes, as well as images, an extensive bibliography, and suggestions for further research
  • Includes such texts as a decoded Maya inscription, letters written during the French and Indian War on the distribution of small pox blankets, and a diatribe by General George Armstrong Custer shortly before he was killed at the Battle of the Little Big Horn

American Indian Stories / by Zitkala-Ša ; foreword by Dexter Fisher.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 1985, c1921.  195pp.  Main Library E99.Y25 Z57 1985 : American Indian Stories is remarkable for being perhaps the first literary work by a Native-American woman created without the mediation of a non-Native interpreter, or collaborator. Zitkala-Ša vividly articulates her disillusionment with the harshness of American-Indian boarding schools and the corruption of government institutions ostensibly established to help Native peoples. At the same time, Zitkala-Ša's collection of autobiographical essays and short stories charts the progression of the author's estrangement from her Dakota people that her colonial education inevitably fostered. Much more than an indictment against U.S. attempts at Native deculturation, American Indian Stories portrays one Dakota woman's spirited and successful efforts to resist the restrictions she felt in both reservation life and Euroamerican assimilation....A woman of the Dakota Sioux, Zitkala-Ša was born on the Yankton Reservation of South Dakota in 1876, the same year as the momentous Battle of the Little Bighorn. Born Gertrude Simmons, she later named herself Zitkala-Ša, which means "Red Bird" in the Lakota language, and continued to use both names in various contexts throughout her life. Gertrude attended a Quaker boarding school for Indian children in Indiana when she was eight years old. She continued to move between her reservation home and Euroamerican schools, attending Earlham College from 1895 to 1897, after which she became a teacher at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania. She later attended the Boston Conservatory of Music in Massachusetts. She was active in the Native-American movement for the rest of her life.

American Indians/American Presidents : a History / edited by Clifford E. Trafzer.  [New York] : Harper, c2009.  272pp.  Main Library E93 .A458 2009 : When the American colonies defeated Britain during the War for Independence, Native American leaders began to establish diplomatic relations with the new nation.  Here, for the first time, is the little-known history of American Indians and American presidents, what they said and felt about one another, and what their words tell us about the history of the United States. Focused on major turning points in Native American history, these pages show how American Indians interpreted the power and prestige of the presidency, and advanced their own agenda for tribal sovereignty, from the age of George Washington to the present day.  In addition to exploring a pantheon of Indian leaders, from Little Turtle to Robert Yellowtail, this book also provides new—and often unexpected—perspectives on the presidents. Thomas Jefferson, traditionally portrayed as the Indians' friend, emerges as a master of the art of Indian dispossession. Richard Nixon, long-tarnished by the Watergate scandal, was in reality a champion of tribal self-determination—a position that sprang, in part, from his Quaker origins. Using inaugural addresses, proclamations, Indian Agency records, private correspondence, memoirs, petitions, photographs, and objects from the collections of the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian, American Indians/American Presidents illuminates the relationship between these diverse leaders, the Native Americans' commitment to tribal self-determination, and the social, geographic, and political evolution of the United States over more than two centuries.

American Indians in British art, 1700-1840 / Stephanie Pratt. Norman : University Of Oklahoma Press, c2005.  198pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection  N8217.I5 P73 2005 : Ask anyone the world over to identify a figure in buckskins with a feather bonnet, and the answer will be "Indian." This stereotypical image is, of course, based on a narrow perception of Indian identity. Many works of art produced by non-Native artists, both European and American, have reflected such a limited viewpoint. In American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840, Stephanie Pratt explores for the first time an artistic tradition that avoided simplification and that instead portrayed Native peoples in a surprisingly complex light....Placing artistic works in historical context, Pratt shows how Indian diplomatic embassies to London were commemorated, how Indian roles in colonial warfare were depicted, and how events involving contact between Europeans and Indians were interpreted....American Indians in British Art, 1700-1840, is richly illustrated with both color and black-and-white illustrations, some of them published here for the first time.

Ancient peoples of the American Southwest / Stephen Plog ; drawings by Amy Elizabeth Grey.  London ; [New York] : Thames & Hudson, 2008.  2nd edition, 224pp.  Main Library E78.S7 P556 2008 : Documents some of the most relevant moments of America's prehistoric past as reflected by its ancient Southwest cultures, offering insight into the lesser-known sophistication of such people as the Anasazi, the Hohokam, and the Mogollon.

The Ancient Southwest : Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde / David E. Stuart.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2009.  142pp.  Main Library E78.N65 S846 2009 : Stuart's accessible stories of the ancient peoples and sites of the American Southwest have been updated with recent discoveries on Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde.

The archaeology of native-lived colonialism : challenging history in the Great Lakes / Neal Ferris.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2009.  226pp.  Main Library E99.C6 F48 2009 : It was during his two decades as the southwest Ontario regional archaeologist for the provincial government, says Ferris, that he had the opportunity to weave various strands of evidence into a long-term narrative of how Native communities in the area negotiated the rise of colonialism during the 18th and 19th centuries. He finds that it was a process of changed continuities, that they maintained identity and historically understood notions of self and community, while incorporating substantial material changes and revisions to those identities. His approach of using archaeology to inform history has potential for use in other situations where both are available, he suggests.

Archaic Societies : Diversity and Complexity Across the Midcontinent / edited by Thomas E. Emerson, Dale L. McElrath, and Andrew C. Fortier.  Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, c2009.  867pp.  Main Library E77.9 .A7 2009  : Essential overview of American Indian Societies during the Archaic Period across central North America.

Art from Fort Marion : the Silberman collection / Joyce M. Szabo.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  197pp.  Main Library E99.K5 S92 2007 : During the 1870s, Cheyenne and Kiowa prisoners of war at Fort Marion, Florida, graphically recorded their responses to incarceration in drawings that conveyed not only the present reality of imprisonment but also nostalgic memories of home. Now, a leading authority on American Indian drawings and paintings examines an important collection of these drawings to reveal how art blossomed at Fort Marion....The Silberman Collection is an unusually complete group of images that illustrate the artists' fascination with the world outside the southern plains, their living conditions and survival strategies as prisoners, and their reminiscences of pre-reservation life. Joyce M. Szabo explains the significance of this preeminent collection, which focuses on seven of the prisoner-artists - most notably Zotom and Making Medicine. In 120 striking color images depicting traditional lifeways, the journey to Fort Marion, and the prison and its environs, Szabo shows how each artist creatively recorded his experiences. Also included are historic black-and-white photographs from the fort....Szabo compares the artists' various styles, examines repeated themes to show how each artist approached the same subjects, and considers the distinctiveness of these drawings as representing the emergent culture of Fort Marion. She also surveys the collection of Fort Marion art since the late 1870s and describes Arthur and Shifra Silberman's particular approaches to collecting....Although other books have considered the Fort Marion artists, this is the first to examine their works in such analytical and comparative detail, Art from Fort Marion: The Silberman Collection captures a unique visual form of Native expression.

Art of the Cherokee : prehistory to the present / Susan C. Power. Athens, Ga. : University of Georgia Press, c2007.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection E99.C5 P72 2007  : This illustrated historical overview features some of the finest examples of Cherokee art in private, corporate, and museum collections throughout the world. As Susan C. Power ranges across the rich legacy of Cherokee artistic achievement from the sixteenth century to the present, she discusses baskets, masks, beaded and embroidered garments, jewelry, and paintings. Power draws on archival and scholarly sources and, when possible, the artists' own words as she interprets these objects in terms of their design, craftsmanship, style, and most important, their function and meaning in Cherokee history and culture....In addition to tracing the development of Cherokee art, Power reveals the wide range of geographical locales from which Cherokee art has originated. These places include the Cherokee's tribal homeland in the Southeast, the tribe's areas of resettlement in the West, and abodes in the United States and beyond to which individuals subsequently moved. Intimately connected to the time and place of its creation, Cherokee art changed along with Cherokee social, political, and economic circumstances. The entry of European explorers into the Southeast, the Trail of Tears, the American Civil War, and the signing of treaties with the U.S. government are among the transforming events in Cherokee art history that Power discusses....In the twentieth century, as Cherokee artists joined the mainstream art world, they helped shape the Native American Fine Art Movement. Today, Cherokee artists continue to create in an artistic voice that is uniquely Cherokee--a voice both traditional and contemporary.

The art of tradition : sacred music, dance, and myth of Michigan's Anishinaabe, 1946-1955 / Gertrude Kurath, Jane Ettawageshik, Fred Ettawageshik ; edited by Michael D. McNally ; foreword by Frank Ettawageshik. East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2009.  469pp.  Main Library E99.C6 K87 2009 : In the 1950s, when musicologist Gertrude Kurath, Jane Ettawageshik, and Fred Ettawageshik created the manuscript "Religious Customs of Modern Michigan Algonquians" for the American Philosophical Society (APS), it was customary in academia to emphasize acculturation and the disintegration of traditional American Indian religions. Today, it is customary to emphasize the perseverance of Indian religions, even if it entails redefining "tradition" and "religion." The difference in emphasis is evident in McNally's edition of the APS manuscript, in which he advises readers "not to accept the authors' conclusions that religion was only a memory by 1950 and that only traditions of healing remained intact" (p. 390). Where the authors--two non-Indian scholars and the Odawa husband of one, whom she refers to as her "informant"--see "Christianized ... survivals" of aboriginal Odawa religion increasingly disconnected from "modern Life," the editor sees Odawa "cultural dexterity" that "worked to ensure the survival of Michigan's Native communities and their cultures." "Our culture is alive," writes Frank Ettawageshik, scion of two of the authors, in the foreword. Valuable for the original manuscript and for the editor's critique.

Battles of the Red River War : archeological perspectives on the Indian campaign of 1874 / J. Brett Cruse ; with contributions by Martha Doty Freeman and Douglas D. Scott ; foreword by Robert M. Utley.  College Station : Texas A&M University Press, c2008.  249pp.  Main Library E83.875 .C78 2008 : Battles of the Red River War unearths a long-buried record of the collision of two cultures....In 1874, U.S. forces led by Col. Ranald S. Mackenzie carried out a surprise attack on several Cheyenne, Comanche, and Kiowa bands that had taken refuge in the Palo Duro Canyon of the Texas panhandle and destroyed their winter stores and horses. After this devastating loss, many of these Indians returned to their reservations and effectively brought to a close what has come to be known as the Red River War, a campaign carried out by the U.S. Army during 1874 as a result of Indian attacks on white settlers in the region. After this operation, the Southern Plains Indians would never again pose a coherent threat to whites' expansion and settlement across their ancestral homelands....Until now, the few historians who have undertaken to tell the story of the Red River War have had to rely on the official records of the battles and a handful of extant accounts, letters, and journals of the U.S. Army participants. Starting in 1998, J. Brett Cruse, under the auspices of the Texas Historical Commission, conducted archeological investigations at six battle sites. In the artifacts they unearthed, Cruse and his teams found clues that would both correct and complete the written records and aid understanding of the Indian perspectives on this clash of cultures....Including a chapter on historiography and archival research by Martha Doty Freeman and an analysis of cartridges and bullets by Douglas D. Scott, this rigorously researched and lavishly illustrated work will commend itself to archeologists, military historians and scientists, and students and scholars of the Westward Expansion.

Beloved women : the political lives of LaDonna Harris and Wilma Mankiller / Sarah Eppler Janda.  DeKalb : Northern Illinois University Press, c2007.  232pp.  Main Library E98.W8 J36 2007 : Janda examines the public roles of LaDonna Harris (Comanche) and Wilma Mankiller (Cherokee), "the two most important Native American women of the twentieth century." Harris became the spokesperson for Indian causes and founded Americans for Indian Opportunity. Mankiller became the first female chief of the Western Cherokee Nation and a symbol for the merging of tradition (even if it was constructed) and the demands of self-determination. Each stressed her tribal cultural roots in creating a platform for political effectiveness. Comparative information indicates that each also drew on feminism and the context of multiculturalism that pervaded the US during the Great Society and saw sovereignty and economic development as keys to Indian progress. Janda analyzes the interaction between feminism and Indian cultures and assesses the accomplishments of Harris and Mankiller, a valuable addition to knowledge about modern Indian leadership and issues. Her research included interviews and access to both Mankiller and Harris collections at the Univ. of Oklahoma, plus studies of Indian women as leaders.

The Betrayal of Faith : the Tragic Journey of a Colonial Native Convert / Emma Anderson.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, c2007.  303pp.  Main Library D6 .H32 v.160  v.160 : Emma Anderson uses one man's compelling story to explore the collision of Christianity with traditional Native religion in colonial North America....Pierre-Anthoine Pastedechouan was born into a nomadic indigenous community of Innu living along the St. Lawrence River in present-day Quebec. At age eleven, he was sent to France by Catholic missionaries to be educated for five years, and then brought back to help Christianize his people....Pastedechouan's youthful encounter with French Catholicism engendered in him a fatal religious ambivalence. Robbed of both his traditional religious identity and critical survival skills, he had difficulty winning the acceptance of his community upon his return. At the same time, his attempts to prove himself to his people led the Jesuits to regard him with increasing suspicion. Suspended between two worlds, Pastedechouan ultimately became estranged--with tragic results--from both his native community and his missionary mentors....An engaging narrative of cultural negotiation and religious coercion, Betrayal of Faith documents the multiple betrayals of identity and culture caused by one young man's experiences with an inflexible French Catholicism. Pastedechouan's story illuminates key struggles to retain and impose religious identity on both sides of the seventeenth-century Atlantic, even as it has a startling relevance to the contemporary encounter between native and non-native peoples.

Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism since 1900 / edited by Daniel M. Cobb and Loretta Fowler.  Santa Fe, N.M. : School for Advanced Research, 2007.  347pp. Main Library  E98.T77 B49 2007 : The concentrated militancy of the American Indian Movement (and the viciousness of the federal response) over the course of the 1970s has captured scholarly attention but perhaps occluded a broader understanding of the Native American "politics of survival," according to Cobb (history, Miami U.) and Fowler (emerita, U. of Oklahoma), who here present 16 papers intended to provide a broader view of American Indian politics from 1900 onward. The papers include a critical overview of American academic work on American Indian politics and a review of federal Indian law and its application in the 20th century. They also provide analysis of various American Indian political battles over the course of the 20th century and contemporary perspectives on current questions of tribal sovereignty

Big Chief Elizabeth : The Adventures and Fate of the First English Colonists in America / Giles Milton.  New York : Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000. 358pp.  Main Library E98.F39 M55 2000 : The swashbuckling story of the extraordinary attempts by English adventurers to claim, divide, and colonize what would be the biggest jewel in Queen Elizabeth's crown: North America. From Richard Hore's 1536 journey to the ill-fated Sir Humfrey Gilbert's attempt, to Sir Walter Ralegh's extravagant expeditions to Roanoke Island and Jamestownwhich led to the first permanent English settlements in America, Milton tells a tale of startling greed, ruthless ambition, terrible hardship, and horrific wars between settlers and indigenous peoples. This was the era of great naval exploration fueled by speculative fervor, of maritime daring and nautical disasters. In April 1586 Queen Elizabeth I acquired a new and exotic title. A tribe of Native Americans had made her their weroanza -- a word that meant "big chief." The news was received with great joy, both by the queen and by her flirtatious favorite, Sir Walter Ralegh. His first American expedition had brought back a captive, Manteo, whose tattooed face and otter-skin cloak had caused a sensation in Elizabethan London. In 1587, Manteo was returned to his homeland as Lord of Roanoke along with more than one hundred English men, women, and children. In 1590, an English supply ship arrived at the coastal colony, but the settlers had disappeared. For almost twenty years the fate of Ralegh's colonists was to remain a mystery. When a new wave of settlers sailed to America to found Jamestown, their efforts to locate the lost colony were frustrated by the mighty chieftain Powhatan -- father of Pocahontas -- who vowed to drive the English out of America, though Pocahontas herself made valiant attempts to thwart the massacre of settlers. While Ralegh's "savage" Manteo had played a pivotal role in establishing the first English settlement in America, he had also unwittingly contributed to one of the earliest chapters in the decimation of the Native American population. A riveting historical mystery of colonial America and Elizabethan England, of the clash between old worlds and new, of civilization and savagery, Big Chief Elizabeth confirms Giles Milton's reputation as one of our most colorful and engaging popular historians.

Black Hawk : the battle for the heart of America / Kerry A. Trask.  New York : Henry Holt, 2006.  368pp.  Main Library E83.83 .T73 2006 : Until 1822, when John Jacob Aster swallowed up the fur trade and the trading posts of the upper Mississippi were closed, the 6,000-strong Sauk Nation occupied one of North America’s largest and most prosperous Indian settlements. Its spacious longhouse lodges and council-house squares, supported by hundreds of acres of planted fields, were the envy of white Americans who had already begun to encroach upon the rich Indian land that served as the center of the Sauk’s spiritual world. When the inevitable conflicts between natives and white squatters turned violent, Black Hawk’s Sauks were forced into exile, banished forever from the east side of the Mississippi River....Longing for what their culture had been, Black Hawk and his followers, including 700 warriors, rose up in a rage in the spring of 1832, and defiantly crossed the Mississippi from Iowa to Illinois in order to reclaim their ancestral home. Though the war lasted only three months, no other violent encounter between white America and native peoples embodies so clearly the essence of the Republic’s inner conflict between its belief in freedom and human rights and its insatiable appetite for new territory....Kerry A. Trask gives new and vivid life to the heroic efforts of Black Hawk and his men, illuminating the tragic history of frontier America through the eyes of those who were cast aside in the pursuit of the new nation’s manifest destiny.

The Black Hawk War of 1832 / Patrick J. Jung.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  275pp.  Main Library E83.83 .J86 2007 : The earliest accounts of the war, including one by Black Hawk himself, were highly concerning with blaming either the Indians or the Whites, says Jung (history, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Wisconsin), and later historians have generally rehashed these arguments. He reconsiders the causes and consequences of the summer 1832 conflict in Illinois, putting it, for example, in the context of Indian resistance to displacement during the period.

Blackfoot war art : pictographs of the reservation period, 1880-2000 / L. James Dempsey.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  461pp.  Main Library E99.S54 D46 2007 : In this survey, L. James Dempsey, a member of the Blood tribe, plumbs the breadth and depth of warrior representational art. He has mined archival resources and museum collections and interviewed many tribal members to provide a uniquely Native perspective on the importance of warrior art in Blackfoot history and culture. Filled with 160 images of startling beauty and power, Blackfoot War Art tells how pictographs served as a record of both tribal and personal accomplishment....This singular historical record of all available information on Blackfoot warrior pictography depicts painted robes; war tepee covers, liners, and doors; and painted panels. Dempsey provides descriptions and a great deal of other information about the pieces included here. His survey focuses especially on recent paintings that scholars have overlooked.

Blood and thunder : an epic of the American West / Hampton Sides.  New York : Doubleday, c2006.  460pp.  Main Library F591 .S54 2006 : “Kit Carson’s role in the conquest of the Navajo during and after the Civil War remains one of the most dramatic and significant episodes in the history of the American West. Hampton Sides portrays Carson in the larger context of the conquest of the entire West, including his frequent and often lethal encounters with hostile Native Americans. Unusually, Sides gives full voice to Indian leaders themselves about their trials and tribulations in their dealings with the whites. Here is a national hero on the level of Daniel Boone, presented with all of his flaws and virtues, in the context of American people’s belief that it was their Manifest Destiny to occupy the entire West.”

Blood struggle : the rise of modern Indian nations / Charles Wilkinson.  New York : Norton, c2005.  543p.  Main Library E98.T77 W546 2005 : Reservations, long mired in poverty and oppression, have become rallying points for Native American society, according to this stirring history of the tribal sovereignty movement. Energized by the Civil Rights movement's gains and pressing their claims under long-dormant treaties, Indian tribes have taken control of reservation government from an autocratic Bureau of Indian Affairs, regained lost lands, asserted hunting and fishing rights, jump-started reservation economic development and revived Indian languages and culture. Wilkinson (American Indians, Time, and the Law; etc.), formerly an attorney for the Native American Rights Fund and now a law professor at the University of Colorado, ranges widely over the sovereignty movement, emphasizing the court cases—like the Pacific Northwest salmon controversies and the wrangles over reservation gambling—that have expanded tribal rights. His sympathetic treatment extols the movement's success in redressing historic injustices, but sometimes skates too easily over difficulties in squaring ethnically based sovereignty with principles of democracy and equal citizenship. (He cites one reservation on which 50 Indians controlled a tribal government claiming jurisdiction over 3,000 non-Indian residents.) And he sometimes defends Native American prerogatives by invoking a cultural uniqueness—Indians' spiritual connection to the land, for example, may entitle them to "flexibility" in complying with environmental laws—that smacks of essentialism. But the story of the Native American renaissance is an inspiring one, and this book marks a deserving chapter.

Bloody Mohawk : the French and Indian War & American revolution on New York's frontier / Richard Berleth.  Hensonville, N.Y. : Black Dome Press Corp., c2009.  370pp.  Main Library F127.M55 B475 2009 : In this narrative history of the Mohawk River Valley and surrounding region from 1713 to1794, Professor Richard Berleth charts the passage of the valley from a fast-growing agrarian region streaming with colonial traffic to a war-ravaged wasteland. The valley's diverse cultural mix of Iroquois Indians, Palatine Germans, Scots-Irish, Dutch, English, and Highland Scots played as much of a role as its unique geography in the cataclysmic events of the 1700s—the French and Indian Wars and the battles of the American Revolution. Patriots eventually wrenched the valley from British interests and the Iroquois nations, but at fearsome cost. When the fighting was over, the valley lay in ruins and as much as two-thirds of its population lay dead or had been displaced. But by not holding this vital inland waterway—the gateway to the West, “the river between the mountains”—America might have lost the Revolution, as well as much or all of the then poorly defined province of New York.

The Blue Tattoo : the Life of Olive Oatman / Margot Mifflin.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  261pp.  Main Library E99.A6 O2755 2009 : In 1851 Olive Oatman was a thirteen-year old pioneer traveling west toward Zion, with her Mormon family. Within a decade, she was a white Indian with a chin tattoo, caught between cultures. The Blue Tattoo tells the harrowing story of this forgotten heroine of frontier America. Orphaned when her family was brutally killed by Yavapai Indians, Oatman lived as a slave to her captors for a year before being traded to the Mohave, who tattooed her face and raised her as their own. She was fully assimilated and perfectly happy when, at nineteen, she was ransomed back to white society. She became an instant celebrity, but the price of fame was high and the pain of her ruptured childhood lasted a lifetime....Based on historical records, including letters and diaries of Oatman’s friends and relatives, The Blue Tattoo is the first book to examine her life from her childhood in Illinois—including the massacre, her captivity, and her return to white society—to her later years as a wealthy banker’s wife in Texas....Oatman’s story has since become legend, inspiring artworks, fiction, film, radio plays, and even an episode of Death Valley Days starring Ronald Reagan. Its themes, from the perils of religious utopianism to the permeable border between civilization and savagery, are deeply rooted in the American psyche. Oatman’s blue tattoo was a cultural symbol that evoked both the imprint of her Mohave past and the lingering scars of westward expansion. It also served as a reminder of her deepest secret, fully explored here for the first time: she never wanted to go home.

The boundaries between us : natives and newcomers along the frontiers of the Old Northwest Territory, 1750-1850 / edited by Daniel P. Barr.  Kent, Ohio : Kent State University Press, c2006.  261pp.  Main Library E78.O4 B58 2006 : This well-crafted collection provides a valuable new look at the experiences of Shawnees, Delawares, and other Natives in the region between the Mississippi River, Great Lakes, and Ohio Valley and their relations with the growing flood of Anglo-American traders, settlers, military men, and politicians. The 11 distinct pieces begin with Ian Steele's examination of how a seemingly insignificant incident in South Carolina may have triggered the French and Indian War, and end with Thomas Lappas's penetrating look at the efforts of the Sac-Fox leader Keokuk to fulfill the duties of a chief while dealing with the threat of removal. Each piece examines a narrow range of people, space, and time, and each historian (from senior scholar to graduate student) has a particular interest: politics, diplomacy, economics, land use, identity, or crime. The resulting book features deep analyses and revelations while providing a broad view of developments and issues in this region during a century of explosive change. Such balance is rarely achieved by edited collections, making this volume useful for undergraduate courses as well as for more focused scholars.

Broken Landscape : Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution / Frank Pommersheim.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 414pp.  Gast Business Library and MSU College of Law Library KF8205 .P63 2009 : Broken Landscape is a sweeping chronicle of Indian tribal sovereignty under the United States Constitution and the way that legal analysis and practice have interpreted and misinterpreted tribal sovereignty since the nation's founding. The Constitution formalized the relationship between Indian tribes and the United States government--a relationship forged through a long history of war and land usurpation--within a federal structure not mirrored in the traditions of tribal governance. Although the Constitution recognized the sovereignty of Indian nations, it did not safeguard tribes against the tides of national expansion and exploitation....As Broken Landscape demonstrates, the federal government has repeatedly failed to respect the Constitution's recognition of tribal sovereignty. Instead, it has favored excessive, unaccountable authority in its dealings with tribes. The Supreme Court has strayed from its Constitutional roots as well, consistently issuing decisions over two centuries that have bolstered federal power over the tribes....Frank Pommersheim, one of America's leading scholars in Indian tribal law, offers a novel and deeply researched synthesis of this legal history from colonial times to the present, confronting the failures of constitutional analysis in contemporary Indian law jurisprudence. Closing with a proposal for a Constitutional amendment that would reaffirm tribal sovereignty, Pommersheim challenges us to finally accord Indian tribes and Indian people the respect and dignity that are their due.

Broken Treaties : United States and Canadian Relations with the Lakotas and the Plains Cree, 1868-1885 / Jill St. Germain.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  450pp.  Main Library E99.T34 S697 2009 : Broken Treaties is a comparative assessment of Indian treaty negotiation and implementation focusing on the first decade following the United States–Lakota Treaty of 1868 and Treaty Six between Canada and the Plains Cree (1876). Jill St. Germain argues that the “broken treaties” label imposed by nineteenth-century observers and perpetuated in the historical literature has obscured the implementation experience of both Native and non-Native participants and distorted our understanding of the relationships between them. As a result, historians have ignored the role of the Treaty of 1868 as the instrument through which the United States and the Lakotas mediated the cultural divide separating them in the period between 1868 and 1875. In discounting the treaty historians have also failed to appreciate the broader context of U.S. politics, which undermined a treaty solution to the Black Hills crisis in 1876. In Canada, on the other hand, the “broken treaties” tradition has obscured the distinctly different understanding of Treaty Six held by Canada and the Plains Cree. The inability of either party to appreciate the other’s position fostered the damaging misunderstanding that culminated in the Northwest Rebellion of 1885. In the first critical assessment of the implementation of these treaties, Broken Treaties restores Indian treaties to a central position in the investigation of Native–non-Native relations in the United States and Canada.

Bury my heart at Wounded Knee : an Indian history of the American West / by Dee Brown.  New York : H. Holt, 2001.  487pp.  Main Library E81 .B75 2001 : Dee Brown's eloquent, fully documented account of the systematic destruction of the American Indian during the second half of the nineteenth century. A national bestseller in hardcover for more than a year after its initial publication, it has sold almost four million copies and has been translated into seventeen languages. For this elegant thirtieth-anniversary edition -- published in both hardcover and paperback -- Brown has contributed an incisive new preface....Using council records, autobiographies, and firsthand descriptions, Brown allows the great chiefs and warriors of the Dakota, Ute, Sioux, Cheyenne, and other tribes to tell us in their own words of the battles, massacres, and broken treaties that finally left them demoralized and defeated. A unique and disturbing narrative told with force and clarity, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee changed forever our vision of how the West was really won.

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Featured Books, C-D

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check online catalog for latest information on location and status.

Canyon gardens : the Ancient Pueblo landscapes of the American Southwest / edited by V.B. Price and Baker H. Morrow.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2006.  217pp.  Main Library  E99.P9 C26 2006 : Canyon Gardens is the long-awaited sequel to Anasazi Architecture and American Design, edited by Price and Morrow (Univ. of New Mexico). Here, they look at both ancient and current day Pueblo land use and care with an eye toward the future of human land stewardship and use. We have been taught to wrestle a living from Earth and subdue its wilderness; as we all now know, this is not working. Land is not a renewable commodity without nurturing. Essays include a Pueblo history, or lack, with a chapter about history-less buildings. Here the story of planned migration and seasonal land renewal begins: with ancient settlers in the desert southwest who gleaned a sustainable life from this region through good times and bad for such a long period of time. Other essays discuss investigations into Native traditions as they develop and unfold throughout the historic period and conflict with European views. Conflicts over land use (and abuse) continue into the present with squabbles over dams and water rights. Current populations must learn from those who called Chaco Canyon home. A refreshing addition to garden or landscape collections; a must for academic collections offering landscape architecture. Scholarly, well-researched and documented; excellent black-and-white photographs and line drawings.

Captive Arizona, 1851-1900 / Victoria Smith.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  194pp.  Main Library E99.M6815 P375 2009 : Captivity was endemic in Arizona from the end of the Mexican-American War through its statehood in 1912. The practice crossed cultures: Native Americans, Mexican Americans, Mexicans, and whites kidnapped and held one another captive. Victoria Smith's narrative history of the practice of taking captives in early Arizona shows how this phenomenon held Arizonans of all races in uneasy bondage that chafed social relations during the era. It also maps the social complex that accompanied captivity, a complex that included orphans, childlessness, acculturation, racial constructions, redemption, reintegration, intermarriage, and issues of heredity and environment....This in-depth work offers an absorbing account of decades of seizure and kidnapping and of the different “captivity systems” operating within Arizona. By focusing on the stories of those taken captive—young women, children, the elderly, and the disabled, all of whom are often missing from southwestern history—Captive Arizona, 1851–1900 complicates and enriches the early social history of Arizona and of the American West.

Carlisle vs. Army : Jim Thorpe, Dwight Eisenhower, Pop Warner, and the forgotten story of football's greatest battle / Lars Anderson.  New York : Random House, c2007. 349pp.  Main Library GV958.U33 A53 2007 : A stunning work of narrative nonfiction, Carlisle vs. Army recounts the fateful 1912 gridiron clash that pitted one of America’s finest athletes, Jim Thorpe, against the man who would become one of the nation’s greatest heroes, Dwight D. Eisenhower. But beyond telling the tale of this momentous event, Lars Anderson also reveals the broader social and historical context of the match, lending it his unique perspectives on sports and culture at the dawn of the twentieth century....This story begins with the infamous massacre of the Sioux at Wounded Knee, in 1890, then moves to rural Pennsylvania and the Carlisle Indian School, an institution designed to “elevate” Indians by uprooting their youths and immersing them in the white man’s ways. Foremost among those ways was the burgeoning sport of football. In 1903 came the man who would mold the Carlisle Indians into a juggernaut: Glenn “Pop” Warner, the son of a former Union Army captain. Guided by Warner, a tireless innovator and skilled manager, the Carlisle eleven barnstormed the country, using superior team speed, disciplined play, and tactical mastery to humiliate such traditional powerhouses as Harvard, Yale, Michigan, and Wisconsin–and to, along the way, lay waste American prejudices against Indians. When a troubled young Sac and Fox Indian from Oklahoma named Jim Thorpe arrived at Carlisle, Warner sensed that he was in the presence of greatness. While still in his teens, Thorpe dazzled his opponents and gained fans across the nation. In 1912 the coach and the Carlisle team could feel the national championship within their grasp....Among the obstacles in Carlisle’s path to dominance were the Cadets of Army, led by a hardnosed Kansan back named Dwight Eisenhower. In Thorpe, Eisenhower saw a legitimate target; knocking the Carlisle great out of the game would bring glory both to the Cadets and to Eisenhower. The symbolism of this matchup was lost on neither Carlisle’s footballers nor on Indians across the country who followed their exploits. Less than a quarter century after Wounded Knee, the Indians would confront, on the playing field, an emblem of the very institution that had slaughtered their ancestors on the field of battle and, in defeating them, possibly regain a measure of lost honor....Filled with colorful period detail and fascinating insights into American history and popular culture, Carlisle vs. Army gives a thrilling, authoritative account of the events of an epic afternoon whose reverberations would be felt for generations.

Catlin's Lament : Indians, Manifest Destiny, and the Ethics of Nature / John Hausdoerffer.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2009.  184pp.  Fine Arts Library - Art Collection ND237.C35 H38 2009 : There are many books on Catlin that focus on his paintings of Native American tribes, including that by William Truettner, The Natural Man Observed: A Study of Catlin's Indian Gallery (CH, May'80). Hausdoerffer (environmental studies and philosophy, Western State College of Colorado) has written the first book to focus on Catlin's influence on US environmental studies/ethics. The book reveals the ambivalence between Catlin's sympathies for the Indian and Catlin's exploitation of the same as an entrepreneur. In the end, Catlin was a product of his time and culture. Hausdoerffer notes that just as Catlin was trapped by Manifest Destiny, contemporary mythology divides the human world from nature, resulting in the continuing destruction of Earth's ecosystems and primal cultures. Essential for programs in history, Native American studies, ethics, American studies, and environmental studies.

Celluloid Indians : Native Americans and film / Jacquelyn Kilpatrick.  Lincoln, NE : University of Nebraska Press, c1999.  261pp.  Main Library PN1995.9.I48 K56 1999 : Native American characters have been the most malleable of metaphors for filmmakers. The likeable Doc of Stagecoach (1939) had audiences on the edge of their seats with dire warnings about “that old butcher, Geronimo.” Old Lodgeskins of Little Big Man (1970) had viewers crying out against the demise of the noble, wise chief and his kind and simple people. In 1995 Disney created a beautiful, peace-loving ecologist and called her Pocahontas. Only occasionally have Native Americans been portrayed as complex, modern characters in films like Smoke Signals....Celluloid Indians is an accessible, insightful overview of Native American representation in film over the past century. Beginning with the birth of the movie industry, Jacquelyn Kilpatrick carefully traces changes in the cinematic depictions of Native peoples and identifies cultural and historical reasons for those changes. In the late twentieth century, Native Americans have been increasingly involved with writing and directing movies about themselves, and Kilpatrick places appropriate emphasis on the impact that Native American screenwriters and filmmakers have had on the industry. Celluloid Indians concludes with a valuable, in-depth look at influential and innovative Native Americans in today’s film industry. [ film ]

The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears / Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green.  New York : Viking, 2007. 189pp.  Main Library E99.C5 P3933 2007 : Today, a fraction of the Cherokee people remains in their traditional homeland in the southern Appalachians. Most Cherokees were forcibly relocated to eastern Oklahoma in the early nineteenth century. In 1830 the U.S. government shifted its policy from one of trying to assimilate American Indians to one of relocating them and proceeded to drive seventeen thousand Cherokee people west of the Mississippi....The Cherokee Nation and the Trail of Tears recounts this moment in American history and considers its impact on the Cherokee, on U.S.-Indian relations, and on contemporary society. Guggenheim Fellowship-winning historian Theda Perdue and coauthor Michael D. Green explain the various and sometimes competing interests that resulted in the CherokeeÂ's expulsion, follow the exiles along the Trail of Tears, and chronicle their difficult years in the West after removal.

The Cherokee nation in the Civil War / Clarissa W. Confer.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  199pp.  Main Library E99.C5 C713 2007 : This book offers a broad overview of the war as it affected the Cherokees--a social history of a people plunged into crisis. The Cherokee Nation in the Civil War shows how the Cherokee people, who had only just begun to recover from the ordeal of removal, faced an equally devastating upheaval in the Civil War. Clarissa W. Confer illustrates how the Cherokee Nation, with its sovereign status and distinct culture, had a wartime experience unlike that of any other group of people--and suffered perhaps the greatest losses of land, population, and sovereignty....No one questions the horrific impact of the Civil War on America, but few realize its effect on American Indians. Residents of Indian Territory found the war especially devastating. Their homeland was beset not only by regular army operations but also by guerillas and bushwhackers. Complicating the situation even further, Cherokee men fought for the Union as well as the Confederacy and created their own "brothers' war."

Chickasaw lives / Richard Green. Ada, Okla. : Chickasaw Press, c2007.  E99.C55 G74 2007 v. 1-2 : v. 1. Explorations in tribal history -- v. 2. Profiles & oral histories. Volume 1 includes articles about the mound builders, the epic battles with DeSoto, the European colonial manipulations and wars, removal to Indian territory, the land allotment period, and the Chickasaw Nation's revitalization in the second half of the twentieth century.

Chickasaw : unconquered and unconquerable / photography by David G. Fitzgerald ; essays by Jeannie Barbour, Amanda Cobb, and Linda Hogan ; introduction by Bill Anoatubby.  Ada, Okla. : Chickasaw Press, c2006. 127pp.  Oversize Collection (Basement, Center) E99.C55 F58 2006 : The story of the Chickasaw Nation is one of survival, persistence, triumph, achievement, and beauty. It is the story of a people determined to not only survive -- but to prosper and live well. Built with this fundamental ideal, Chickasaw government stands on a foundation that serves its people with the ebb and flow of history's events. It is a chronicle of unsurpassed natural splendor and spiritual connectivity to the land that can never be permanently separated from the hearts of Chickasaws. It is a collective mind-set and determination rooted in community and loyalty to family. Like the Hummingbird Warrior, it is ever vigilant, industrious, energetic and adaptable." -- Bill Anoatubby, Governor of the Chickasaw Nation.... From their homelands (what is now Alabama, Mississippi, Kentucky, and Tennessee), to the removal of the Chickasaws to Indian Territory, and to their thriving nation of today, the Chickasaw people represent one of the most resilient cultures in American history. CHICKASAW: UNCONQUERED AND UNCONQUERABLE tells their own incredible story through vivid photography and rich essays. Grounded in their deep devotion to family and community, the Chickasaw's cultural identity is at the root of each individual. Featuring the award-winning photography of David Fitzgerald and essays by Chickasaw writers Jeannie Barbour, American Book Award-winner Amanda Cobb, and Linda Hogan, the Chickasaw's unique history and identity emerge in this authoritative book. Investing in their future while thriving as a nation today continues to make them truly unconquered and unconquerable.

Chief Bender's burden : the silent struggle of a baseball star / Tom Swift.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.  339pp.  Main Library GV865.B45 S95 2008 : The greatest American Indian baseball player of all time, Charles Albert Bender, was, according to a contemporary, "the coolest pitcher in the game." Using a trademark delivery, an impressive assortment of pitches that may have included the game's first slider, and an apparently unflappable demeanor, he earned a reputation as baseball's great clutch pitcher during tight Deadball Era pennant races and in front of boisterous World Series crowds. More remarkably yet, "Chief" Bender's Hall of Fame career unfolded in the face of immeasurable prejudice. This skillfully told and complete account of Bender's life is also a portrait of greatness of character maintained despite incredible pressure - of how a celebrated man thrived while carrying an untold weight on his shoulders....With a journalist's eye for detail and a novelist's feel for storytelling, Tom Swift takes readers on Bender's improbable journey - from his early years on the White Earth Reservation, to his development at the Carlisle Indian School, to his big break and eventual rise to the pinnacle of baseball. The story of a paradoxical American sports hero, one who achieved a once-unfathomable celebrity while suffering the harsh injustices of a racially intolerant world, Chief Bender's Burden is an eye-opening and inspiring narrative of a unique American life.

Comanche Empire / Pekka Hämäläinen.   New Haven : Yale University Press, c2008.  500pp.  Main Library E99.C85 H27 2008 : In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, at the high tide of imperial struggles in North America, an indigenous empire rose to dominate the fiercely contested lands of the American Southwest, the southern Great Plains, and northern Mexico. This powerful empire, built by the Comanche Indians, eclipsed its various European rivals in military prowess, political prestige, economic power, commercial reach, and cultural influence. Yet, until now, the Comanche empire has gone unrecognized in historical accounts....This compelling and original book uncovers the lost story of the Comanches. It is a story that challenges the idea of indigenous peoples as victims of European expansion and offers a new model for the history of colonial expansion, colonial frontiers, and Native-European relations in North America and elsewhere. Pekka Hämäläinen shows in vivid detail how the Comanches built their unique empire and resisted European colonization, and why they fell to defeat in 1875. With extensive knowledge and deep insight, the author brings into clear relief the Comanches’ remarkable impact on the trajectory of history.

Competing Voices from Native America / Dewi Ioan Ball and Joy Porter.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood Press, 2009.  445pp. Main Library E77 .C743 2009 : Not restricted to writings about specifically military conflict, the anthology takes in 'fighting words' - of both Natives and non-Natives in the United States - on a range of conflicts and bitterly-contested issues involving Native American experiences and rights, from the period of 'discovery', through the colonial era and the Indian wars, via the federal developments in policy in the 19th and 20th centuries, to the present day, with its ongoing disputes, such as the bitter argument over political prisoner Leonard Peltier or the struggle between Natives and non-Natives over law, jurisdiction and gaming in Indian Country.

Constructing lives at Mission San Francisco : native Californians and Hispanic colonists, 1776-1821 / Quincy D. Newell.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2009.  267pp.  Main Library E78.C15 N44 2009 : Located at the tip of the San Francisco peninsula in the heart of what is now the city's Mission District, the Mission of San Francisco de Asís, established in 1776, was the sixth to be founded in the Alta California mission system. Northern California was home to many small tribal communities when the Franciscans began developing missions in the area in 1769. While no firsthand written accounts exist of Bay Area Indians' experiences at Mission San Francisco, there is evidence that, just as Hispanic colonists introduced Hispanic cultural customs to California, Bay Area Indians retained their own cultural traditions as they entered the missions....In this finely crafted study Quincy Newell examines the complexity of cultural contact between Franciscans and the native populations at Mission San Francisco. Records of traditional rituals and lifeways taking place alongside introduced doctrines and practices reveal the various ways California Indians adopted, adapted, and rejected aspects of mission life. Using baptismal, marriage, and death records to tell the history of these colonized peoples, Newell demonstrates that the priests' conversion and Hispanicization of the Bay Area Indians remained partial at best.

Contesting Knowledge : Museums and Indigenous Perspectives / edited by Susan Sleeper-Smith.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  362pp.  Main Library and Faculty Book Collection GN35 .C64 2009 : This interdisciplinary and international collection of essays illuminates the importance and effects of Indigenous perspectives for museums. The contributors challenge and complicate the traditionally close colonialist connections between museums and nation-states and urge more activist and energized roles for museums in the decades ahead.... The essays in section 1 consider ethnography’s influence on how Europeans represent colonized peoples. Section 2 essays analyze curatorial practices, emphasizing how exhibitions must serve diverse masters rather than solely the curator’s own creativity and judgment, a dramatic departure from past museum culture and practice. Section 3 essays consider tribal museums that focus on contesting and critiquing colonial views of American and Canadian history while serving the varied needs of the indigenous communities....The institutions examined in these pages range broadly from the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington DC; the Oneida Nation Museum in Oneida, Wisconsin; tribal museums in the Klamath River region in California; the tribal museum in Zuni, New Mexico; the Museum of the American Indian in New York City; and the District Six Museum in Cape Town, South Africa.

Crazy Horse : a Lakota life / Kingsley M. Bray.  Norman : University of Oklahoma, c2006. 510pp.  Main Library E99.O3 C72163 2006 : Although Crazy Horse has been a favorite subject for decades, many key aspects of his short life have remained enigmatic. In this extensively documented account, Bray utilizes a diverse array of primary sources, including contemporary Indian agent reports, personal military diaries, annual reports of the U.S. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, and surprisingly detailed oral histories recorded in interviews with Crazy Horse's contemporaries nearly 50 years after his death. Bray documents not only the chief's well-known battles but also some of the more personal elements of his life, including his mother's suicide, his marriages, his visions, and his initiation into the Strong Hearts, a Lakota isolationist group that eschewed all contact with Americans. Crazy Horse's belief in the importance of the Black Hills to Lakota survival eventually leads him on the path to the Little Bighorn in June 1876, and to his death a year later. Bray's account not only traces the major steps taken by this remarkable chief, but also places them within the context of Lakota culture, past and present.

Criminal Justice in Native America / edited by Marianne O. Nielsen and Robert A. Silverman.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2009.  242pp.  Main Library E98.C87 C75 2009 : Native Americans are disproportionately represented as offenders in the U.S. criminal justice system, particularly in the southwestern and north-central regions. However, until recently there was little investigation into the reasons for their over-representation. Furthermore, there has been little acknowledgment of the positive contributions of Native Americans to the criminal justice system—in rehabilitating offenders, aiding victims, and supporting service providers. This book offers a valuable and contemporary overview of how the American criminal justice system impacts Native Americans on both sides of the law....Each of the fourteen chapters of Criminal Justice in Native America was commissioned specifically for this volume. Contributors—many of whom are Native Americans—rank among the top scholars in their fields. Some of the chapters treat broad subjects, including crime, police, courts, victimization, corrections, and jurisdiction. Others delve into more specific topics, including hate crimes against Native Americans, state-corporate crimes against Native Americans, tribal peacemaking, and cultural stresses of police officers. Separate chapters are devoted to women and juveniles....The well-known scholar Marianne Nielsen provides a context-setting introduction, in which she addresses the history of the legal treatment of Native Americans in the United States as well as a provocative conclusion that details important issues for current and future research in Native American criminal justice studies. Intended to introduce students to the substantive concerns of a range of disciplines that contribute to Native American Studies—among them, criminal justice andcriminology, law, sociology, and anthropology—Criminal Justice in Native America will interest all readers who are concerned about relationships between Native peoples and prevailing criminal justice systems.

Daughters of mother earth : the wisdom of Native American women / edited by Barbara Alice Mann ; foreword by Winona LaDuke.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2006.  133pp.  Main Library E98.W8 D38 2006  : Believing that it is important to privilege the voices of Native American women over those of Eurocentric male writers of Native American history, Mann  presents four essays that explore issues of Native American history and culture. The major topics include the role of dress and dance in the lifeways of Indians, the need to reconstitute traditional social structures, how the imposition of European culture disempowered Native American women, and the need to repair cultural communication between Native Americans of the east and the west of the Mississippi.

Documents of Native American Political Development : 1500s to 1933 / [edited by] David E. WilkinsOxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  534pp. Main Library E98.T77 D63 2009 :  The arrival of European and Euro-American colonizers in the Americas brought not only physical attacks against Native American tribes, but also further attacks against the sovereignty of these Indian nations. Though the violent tales of the Trail of Tears, Black Hawk's War, and the Battle of Little Big Horn are taught far and wide, the political structure and development of Native American tribes, and the effect of American domination on Native American sovereignty, have been greatly neglected. This book contains a variety of primary source and other documents--traditional accounts, tribal constitutions, legal codes, business councils, rules and regulations, BIA agents reports, congressional discourse, intertribal compacts--written both by Natives from many different nations and some non-Natives, that reflect how indigenous peoples continued to exercise a significant measure of self-determination long after it was presumed to have been lost, surrendered, or vanquished. The documents are arranged chronologically, and Wilkins provides brief, introductory essays to each document, placing them within the proper context. Each introduction is followed by a brief list of suggestions for further reading.  Covering a fascinating and relatively unknown period in Native American history, from the earliest examples of indigenous political writings to the formal constitutions crafted just before the American intervention of the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934, this anthology will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students of the political development of indigenous peoples the world over.

Dog Soldier Justice : the Ordeal of Susanna Alderdice in the Kansas Indian War / Jeff Broome ; foreword to the Bison Books edition by John H. Monnett ; with a new preface by the author.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  313pp.  Main Library E83.866 .B86 2009 : In his study of the civilian population that fell victim to the brutality of the 1860s Kansas Indian wars, Jeff Broome recounts the captivity of Susanna Alderdice, who was killed along with three of her children by her Cheyenne captors (known as Dog Soldiers) at the Battle of Summit Springs in July 1869, and of her four-year-old son, who was wounded then left for dead. 

Dream songs and ceremony : reflections on traditional California Indian dance / Frank LaPena.  Berkeley, Calif. : Great Valley Books/Heyday Books, c2004.  45pp.  Main Library E99.W78 L37 2004 : Concentrating on the dance traditions of the Upper Sacramento Valley and Sierra foothills, LaPena discusses how being an Indian dancer has influenced him physically, spiritually, and socially. His paintings portray ceremonial and sacred elements from all three realms, with fascinating stories infused in every image. This bold and colorful book will be a welcome addition to the library of anyone interested in sacred traditional activities, dance, or Native American art and culture.

Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country / Marsha Weisiger.  Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2009.  391pp.  Main Library E99.N3 W437 2009 : Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country offers a fresh interpretation of the history of Navajo (Diné) pastoralism. A dramatic reduction of livestock on the Navajo Reservation in the 1930s - mainly sheep, goats, and horses - was an ambitious attempt by the federal government to eliminate overgrazing on an arid landscape and to better the lives of the people who lived there. Instead, the policy was a disaster, resulting in the loss of livelihood for Navajos - especially women, the primary owners and tenders of flocks - without significant improvement of the grazing lands....Livestock on the reservation increased exponentially after the late 1860s as more and more people and animals, hemmed in on all sides by Anglo and Hispanic ranchers, tried to feed themselves on an increasingly barren landscape. At the beginning of the twentieth century, grazing lands were already showing signs of distress. As soil conditions worsened, weeds unpalatable for livestock pushed out nutritious native grasses, until by the 1930s federal officials believed conditions had reached a critical point. Well-intentioned New Dealers made serious errors in anticipating the human and environmental consequences of removing or killing tens of thousands of animals....Environmental historian Marsha Weisiger examines the factors that led to the poor condition of the range and explains how the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the Navajos, and climate change all contributed to it. Using archival sources and oral accounts, she describes the importance of land and stock animals in Navajo culture. By positioning women at the center of the story, she demonstrates the place they hold as significant actors in Native American and environmental history....Dreaming of Sheep in Navajo Country is a compelling and important story that looks at the people and conditions that contributed to a botched policy whose legacy is still felt by the Navajos and their lands today.

Note : Always check status to make sure book is available for use.  If status indicates In Process, ask for book at Circulation Desk.

Featured Books, E-H

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status.  If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

The earth shall weep : a history of Native America / James Wilson.  New York : Atlantic Monthly Press ; [Berkeley, Calif. : Distributed by Publishers Group West, 1999]  466pp.  Main Library E77 .W54 1999  : A comprehensive, authoritative history of Native America draws on ethnography, archaeology, Indian oral tradition, and other sources to document the evolution of native cultures and examines the collision between indigenous cultures and European settlers over the course of the past four centuries.

Edmund Pickens (Okchantubby) : first elected Chickasaw Chief, his life and times / by Juanita J. Keel Tate.  [Ada, Okla.] : Chickasaw Press, c2008.  89pp.  Main Library E99.C55 T38 2008 : Edmund Pickens lived through a crucial period in Chickasaw history. During Removal in 1836, he traveled with his wife and children on the sad journey from the Chickasaw homelands to Indian Territory. Like other Chickasaws, he faced many hardships after settling in the new territory. But as Juanita J. Keel Tate shows in this first book-length account of Pickens's life and times, he persevered and triumphed as a statesman and tribal leader....Tate devoted forty-seven years to researching and writing about Pickens, visiting many courthouses in the Chickasaw homelands to locate early Chickasaw homesteads and Pickens family records. In Edmund Pickens (Okchantubby): First Elected Chickasaw Chief, His Life and Times, Tate describes Pickens's service as a representative on several Chickasaw commissions that negotiated important treaties in Washington, D.C., and his work as a member of the delegation that signed the Treaty of Doaksville with Choctaw leaders in 1854. Pickens helped develop the 1856 Chickasaw Constitution and served in the Chickasaw Senate from 1857 to 1861. He signed the treaty of alliance with the Confederate States of America in 1861 and lived through the tumultuous period of the Civil War. Afterward, he served as a commissioner, negotiating the Reconstruction Treaty of 1866. Respected by the Chickasaw people for his devotion and trustworthiness, Pickens was the first elected chief of the Chickasaw Nation. With this insightful biography, Tate provides the testimony to Pickens's character that this great leader has long deserved.

Empowerment of North American Indian girls : ritual expressions at puberty / Carol A. Markstrom.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.  425pp.  Main Library E98.S7 M24 2008 : An examination of coming-of-age-ceremonies for American Indian girls past and present, featuring an in-depth look at Native ideas about human development and puberty. Many North American Indian cultures regard the transition from childhood to adulthood as a pivotal and potentially vulnerable phase of life and have accordingly devised coming-of-age rituals to affirm traditional values and community support for its members. Such rituals are a positive and enabling social force in many modern Native communities whose younger generations are wrestling with substance abuse, mental health problems, suicide, and school dropout....Developmental psychologist Carol A. Markstrom reviews indigenous, historical, and anthropological literatures and conveys the results of her fieldwork to provide descriptive accounts of North American Indian coming-of-age rituals. She gives special attention to the female puberty rituals in four communities: Apache, Navajo, Lakota, and Ojibwa. Of particular interest is the distinctive Apache Sunrise Dance, which is described and analyzed in detail. Also included are American Indian feminist interpretations of menstruation and menstrual taboos, the feminine in cosmology, and the significance of puberty customs and rites for the development of young women.

Everything You Know About Indians is Wrong / Paul Chaat Smith.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2009.  193pp.  Main Library E98.C89 S64 2009 : In this acerbic collection of essays, Comanche cultural critic and art curator Smith (Like a Hurricane) riffs on the romantic stereotypes of Indian as "spiritual masters and first environmentalists," as tragic victims of technology and civilization, as primal beings brimming with nomad authenticity, their every artifact a gem of folk art. Such tropes, he complains, hide the riotous complexity of the modern Indian experience, which he visits in pieces that explore his grandfather's Christian church, Sitting Bull's savvy manipulation of his media image (he had an agent) and the author's own Comanche forebears, who were both "world-class barbarians" and avid adopters of the white man's gadgetry. These loose-limbed essays range all over the landscape, from Hollywood westerns to the 1973 siege of Wounded Knee to (somewhat obscurely) the contemporary Indian art scene. Smith doesn't entirely square his view of Indians as "just plain folks" with his advancing of a unique Indian cultural perspective, but his keen, skeptical eye makes such ironies both amusing and enlightening.

Exiles and pioneers : eastern Indians in the Trans-Mississippi West / John P. Bowes.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.  272pp.  Main Library E98.R4 B68 2007 : Exiles and Pioneers analyzes the removal and post-removal histories of Shawnee, Delaware, Wyandot, and Potawatomi Indians. The book argues that the experience of these eastern Indians from the late 1700s to the 1860s was at its core a struggle over geographic and political place within the expanding United States. Even as American expansion limited the geographic scope of Indian lands, the extension of American territories and authority raised important questions about the political status of these Indians as individuals as well as nations within the growing republic. More specifically, the national narrative and even the prominent images of Indian removal cast the eastern Indians as exiles who were constantly pushed beyond the edges of American settlement. This study proposes that ineffective federal policies and ongoing debates within Indian communities also cast some of these eastern Indians as pioneers, unwilling trailblazers in the development of the United States.

Faces From the Land : Twenty Years of Powwow Tradition / Ben and Linda Marra ; photographs by Ben Marra ; foreword by George P. Horse Capture ; afterword by Joanna Cohan Scherer. New York : Abrams, 2009. 175pp.  Main Library E98.P86 M36 2009 : Faces from the Land reveals the dancers, who, united by the ageless rhythms of the powwow drums, come from many tribes, different trades, and every corner of North America and celebrate customs both ancient and modern, bringing them together as a proud community to preserve tribal traditions....Since 1988, photographer Ben Marra and his wife, Linda, have crisscrossed the nation to document the majestic dance regalia worn at Native American powwows. Traveling to over 30 cities a year, Ben Marra invites participants into his makeshift studio to be photographed in full traditional dress, while Linda records the stories behind their outfits and dance. The resulting images are stunning, and capture not only the brilliant colors and incredible craftsmanship of the regalia, but the personal journeys that inspired them.

Facing East from Indian country : a Native history of early America / Daniel K. Richter.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2001.  317pp.  Main Library E98.F39 R53 2001 (Also available online) : In the beginning, North America was Indian country. But only in the beginning. After the opening act of the great national drama, Native Americans yielded to the westward rush of European settlers....Or so the story usually goes. Yet, for three centuries after Columbus, Native people controlled most of eastern North America and profoundly shaped its destiny. In Facing East from Indian Country, Daniel K. Richter keeps Native people center-stage throughout the story of the origins of the United States....Viewed from Indian country, the sixteenth century was an era in which Native people discovered Europeans and struggled to make sense of a new world. Well into the seventeenth century, the most profound challenges to Indian life came less from the arrival of a relative handful of European colonists than from the biological, economic, and environmental forces the newcomers unleashed. Drawing upon their own traditions, Indian communities reinvented themselves and carved out a place in a world dominated by transatlantic European empires. In 1776, however, when some of Britain's colonists rebelled against that imperial world, they overturned the system that had made Euro-American and Native coexistence possible. Eastern North America only ceased to be an Indian country because the revolutionaries denied the continent's first peoples a place in the nation they were creating....In rediscovering early America as Indian country, Richter employs the historian's craft to challenge cherished assumptions about times and places we thought we knew well, revealing Native American experiences at the core of the nation's birth and identity.

Facing the future : the Indian Child Welfare Act at 30 / edited by Matthew L. M. Fletcher, Wenona T. Singel, and Kathryn E. Fort.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2009.  299pp.  MSU Business Library KF8210.C45 F33 2009 : The U.S. Congress is charged with responsibility for the protection and preservation of American Indian tribes, including Indian children. In 1978, Congress enacted the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA), with the intent to "protect the best interests of Indian children and to promote the stability and security of Indian tribes and families." ICWA sets federal requirements that apply to state child custody proceedings involving an Indian child who is a member of or eligible for membership in a federally recognized tribe. ICWA also sets out federal requirements regarding removal of Indian children and their placement in foster or adoptive homes, and it allows the child's tribe to intervene in the case....The history of the Act is a tangle of legal, social, and emotional complications. Some state courts have found unusual legal arguments to avoid applying the law, while some states have gone beyond the terms of the Act to provide greater protections for Indian people. This collection brings together for the first time a multidisciplinary assessment of the law — with scholars, practitioners, lawyers, and social workers all offering perspectives on the value and importance of the Indian Child Welfare Act.

Fellow travelers : Indians and Europeans contesting the early American trail / Philip Levy.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.  199pp.  Main Library E98.T7 L48 2007 : This engaging monograph examines interactions between Native Americans and European explorers and colonists from the late 16th into the 19th century as they traveled together on the networks of Native trails. Levy (Univ. of South Florida) argues that these trails were central and distinctive sites of contest and negotiation between Natives and newcomers, because shared travel constantly required travelers to make decisions about which path to take, how to deal with potential difficulties, or how to choose between differing habits of travel. Organized thematically and relying predominantly on European travelers' accounts, this work examines the economic logic of shared travel, the cultural differences exposed in travel habits (including a separate chapter detailing how different travelers responded to the threat of rattlesnakes on the trail), and how competing ideals of manhood emerged as Europeans and Natives challenged each others' masculinity. Traveling had the potential to blur distinctions between guides and explorers or traders, because they shared most of the same deprivations and dangers. At the same time, trails were important places where Native Americans and Europeans noticed cultural differences and worked to maintain and elaborate on those distinctions.

Fire light : the life of Angel De Cora, Winnebago artist / Linda M. Waggoner.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.  355pp.  Main Library E99.W7 W34 2008 : Angel De Cora was an early twentieth century artist, a painters, furniture, jewelry and fabric designer and illustrator. She was also a Winnebago Indian, born in Nebraska and educated in the infamous Indian Schools in which the pupils were forced to assimilate into White language and culture. She taught art at the Carlisle School, illustrated several books and magazines and was highly respected among artists like Howard Pyle. She both absorbed Western techniques and retained Native themes and point of view. In this biography, independent scholar Waggoner recounts the life and work of De Cora. In doing so she also explores the struggle felt by many Native Americans to retain their identity in the face of a determined effort to eradicate it. De Cora is also part of the ongoing trend for female artists, respected in their lifetime, to be quickly forgotten after their deaths. This is a well-written and researched book on a topic that is of interest to art historians, feminists and historians of the American Indian.

First Peoples in a New World : Colonizing Ice Age America / David J. Meltzer.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2009.  446pp.  Main Library E77.9 .M45 2009 : More than 12,000 years ago, in one of the greatest triumphs of prehistory, humans colonized North America, a continent that was then truly a new world. Just when and how they did so has been one of the most perplexing and controversial questions in archaeology. This dazzling, cutting-edge synthesis, written for a wide audience by an archaeologist who has long been at the center of these debates, tells the scientific story of the first Americans: where they came from, when they arrived, and how they met the challenges of moving across the vast, unknown landscapes of Ice Age North America. David J. Meltzer pulls together the latest ideas from archaeology, geology, linguistics, skeletal biology, genetics, and other fields to trace the breakthroughs that have revolutionized our understanding in recent years. Among many other topics, he explores disputes over the hemisphere's oldest and most controversial sites and considers how the first Americans coped with changing global climates. He also confronts some radical claims: that the Americas were colonized from Europe or that a crashing comet obliterated the Pleistocene megafauna. Full of entertaining descriptions of on-site encounters, personalities, and controversies, this is a compelling behind-the-scenes account of how science is illuminating our past.

Foraging in the Tennessee River Valley, 12,500 to 8,000 Years Ago / Kandace D. Hollenbach.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2009.  298pp.  Main Library E78.T33 H65 2009 : Plants are inarguably a significant component of the diets of foraging peoples in non-arctic environments. As such, the decisions and activities associated with the gathering and exploitation of plants are important to foragers’ subsistence pursuits. Plant remains are particularly important for understanding gathering activities. Inasmuch as plant foods comprised a considerable portion of early foragers’ diets, and the gathering and processing of these plant resources occupied a significant proportion of the population, namely women, children, and the elderly, an understanding of gathering activities and how they relate to use of the landscape is critical. Organic remains are poorly preserved in the acidic soils of the Southeast and are often limited or absent from open-air sites, but archaeological deposits protected within rockshelters provide an exception. Organic remains are consistently well preserved in their rain-protected deposits, and rockshelters are locations that groups repeatedly visited. Because of this repeated use and remarkable preservation, significant quantities of well-preserved faunal and botanical remains can be recovered from rockshelter deposits....In Foraging, Hollenbach analyzes and compares botanical remains from archaeological excavations in four rockshelters in the Middle Tennessee River Valley. The artifact assemblages of rockshelter and open-air sites are similar, so it is reasonable to assume that faunal and botanical assemblages would be similar, if open-air sites had comparable preservation of organic remains. The rich organic data recovered from rockshelters therefore may be considered representative of general subsistence and settlement strategies, and can significantly inform our views of lifeways of Late Paleoindian and Early Archaic peoples. The data produced from this analysis provides a valuable baseline of plant food use by early foragers in the region, and establishes a model of Late Paleoindian and Early Archaic lifeways in the Southeast.

Frontier forts of Iowa : Indians, traders, and soldiers, 1682-1862 / edited by William E. WhittakerIowa City : University of Iowa Press, c2009.  266pp.  Main Library F623 .F76 2009 : least fifty-six frontier forts once stood in, or within view of, what is now the state of Iowa. The earliest date to the 1680s, while the latest date to the Dakota uprising of 1862. Some were vast compounds housing hundreds of soldiers; others consisted of a few sheds built by a trader along a riverbank. Regardless of their size and function - William Whittaker and his contributors include any compound that was historically called a fort, whether stockaded or not, as well as all military installations - all sought to control and manipulate Indians to the advantage of European and American traders, governments, and settlers. Frontier Forts of Iowa draws extensively upon the archaeological and historical records to document this era of transformation from the seventeenth-century fur trade until almost all Indians had been removed from the region. The earliest European-constructed forts along the Mississippi, Des Moines, and Missouri rivers fostered a complex relationship between Indians and early traders. After the Louisiana Purchase of 1804, American military forts emerged in the Upper Midwest, defending the newly claimed territories from foreign armies, foreign traders, and foreign-supported Indians. After the War of 1812, new forts were built to control Indians until they could be moved out of the way of American settlers; forts of this period, which made extensive use of roads and trails, teamed a military presence with an Indian agent who negotiated treaties and regulated trade. The final phase of fort construction in Iowa occurred in response to the Spirit Lake massacre and the Dakota uprising; the complete removal of the Dakota in 1863 marked the end of frontier forts in a state now almost completely settled by Euro-Americans. By focusing on the archaeological evidence produced by many years of excavations and by supporting their words with a wealth of maps and illustrations, the authors uncover the past and connect it with the real history of real places. In so doing they illuminate the complicated and dramatic history of the Upper Midwest in a time of enormous change. Past is linked to present in the form of a section on visiting original and reconstructed forts today.

Furs and frontiers in the far north  : the contest among native and foreign nations for the Bering Strait fur trade / John R. Bockstoce ; foreword by Felipe Fernandez-Armesto.  New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009. 1 online resource (xx, 472 p.) : ill., maps (some col.) F951 .B63 2009 Online : "This comprehensive history of the native and maritime fur trade in Alaska during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is without precedent. The Bering Strait formed the nexus of the circumpolar fur trade in which Russians, British, Americans, and members of fifty native nations competed and cooperated. The desire to dominate the fur trade fed the European expansion into the most remote regions of Asia and America and was an agent of massive change in these regions....Award-winning author John R. Bockstoce fills a major gap in the historiography of the area in covering the scientific, commercial, and foreign-relations implications of the northern fur trade. In addition, the book provides rare insight into the relationship between the Western powers and the Native Americans who provided them with fur, ivory, and whalebone in exchange for manufactured goods, tobacco, tea, alcohol, and hundreds of other things. But this is also the story of the enterprising individuals who energized the Alaskan fur trade and, in doing so, forever altered the region's history.

Gall : Lakota war chief / Robert W. Larson.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  301pp.   Main Library E99.H795 G355 2007 : This work by Larson is the first scholarly biography of the Lakota chief, Gall, a military comrade of Sitting Bull. Gall's actions at the Battle of Little Bighorn and in other campaigns against the US government encroachments of Indian lands are of course discussed, as is his eventual parting of the ways with Sitting Bull, when Gall rejected his mentor's traditionalism and supported the assimilation agenda of Indian agent James McLauglin. Larson's biography paints a portrait of a pragmatic leader that is significantly kinder than previous imprecations of the Lakota chief as a political opportunist.

Gathering native scholars : UCLA's forty years of American Indian culture and research / edited by Kenneth Lincoln.  Los Angeles, Calif. : UCLA American Indian Studies Center, c2009.  630pp.  Main Library E77.2 .G38 2009 : This collection features the best of the past forty years of scholarship published in the multidisciplinary American Indian Culture and Research Journal. Selected by editor Kenneth Lincoln for their significance in shaping the field of American Indian Studies, the articles will be of value to students and scholars in history, law, education, cultural studies, English, Native American Studies, and many other academic, professional, and lay fields.

God is red : a native view of religion / Vine Deloria, Jr.  Golden, Colo. : Fulcrum Pub., c1994. 313pp.  Main Library BL2776 .D44 1994 : First published in 1972, God Is Red remains the seminal work on Native religious views, asking new questions about our species and our ultimate fate. This best-selling classic reminds us to learn “that we are a part of nature, not a transcendent species with no responsibilities to the natural world.” [ religion ]

Great Lakes Indian Accommodation and Resistance During the Early Reservation Years, 1850-1900 / Edmund Jefferson Danziger, Jr.  Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2009.  322pp.  Main Library E78.G7 D367 2009 : During the four decades following the War of 1812, Great Lakes Indians were forced to surrender most of their ancestral homelands and begin refashioning their lives on reservations. The challenges Indians faced during this period could not have been greater. By century's end, settlers, frontier developers, and federal bureaucrats possessed not only economic and political power but also the bulk of the region's resources. It is little wonder that policymakers in Washington and Ottawa alike anticipated the disappearance of distinctive Indian communities within a single generation. However, these predictions have proved false as Great Lakes Indian communities, though assaulted on both sides of the international border to this day, have survived. Danziger's lively and insightful book documents the story of these Great Lakes Indians—a study not of victimization but of how Aboriginal communities and their leaders have determined their own destinies and preserved core values, lands, and identities against all odds and despite ongoing marginalization....Utilizing eyewitness accounts from the 1800s and an innovative, cross-national approach, Danziger explores not only how Native Americans adapted to their new circumstances—including attempts at horse and plow agriculture, the impact of reservation allotment, and the response to Christian evangelists—but also the ways in which the astute and resourceful Great Lakes chiefs, councils, and clan mothers fought to protect their homeland and preserve the identity of their people. Through their efforts, dreams of economic self-sufficiency and self-determination as well as the historic right to unimpeded border crossings—from one end of the Great Lakes basin to the other—were kept alive.

The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand : Roanoke's Forgotten Indians / Michael Leroy Oberg. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008.  205pp.  Main Library E99.A35 O24 2008 : Roanoke is part of the lore of early America, the colony that disappeared. Many Americans know of Sir Walter Ralegh's ill-fated expedition, but few know about the Algonquian peoples who were the island's inhabitants. The Head in Edward Nugent's Hand examines Ralegh's plan to create an English empire in the New World but also the attempts of native peoples to make sense of the newcomers who threatened to transform their world in frightening ways....Beginning his narrative well before Ralegh's arrival, Michael Leroy Oberg looks closely at the Indians who first encountered the colonists. The English intruded into a well-established Native American world at Roanoke, led by Wingina, the weroance, or leader, of the Algonquian peoples on the island. Oberg also pays close attention to how the weroance and his people understood the arrival of the English: we watch as Wingina's brother first boards Ralegh's ship, and we listen in as Wingina receives the report of its arrival. Driving the narrative is the leader's ultimate fate: Wingina is decapitated by one of Ralegh's men in the summer of 1586....When the story of Roanoke is recast in an effort to understand how and why an Algonquian weroance was murdered, and with what consequences, we arrive at a more nuanced and sophisticated understanding of what happened during this, the dawn of English settlement in America.

The historical atlas of Native Americans / Ian Barnes.  Edison, N.J. : Chartwell Books, c2009. 1 atlas (400 p.) : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 34 cm.  Map Library (3 West) Short Atlas Case G1106.E1 B3 2009 : Explores the social, political, and geographical history of North America's native peoples.

A History of the Ancient Southwest / Stephen H. Lekson. Santa Fe, N.M. : School for Advanced Research Press, 2009.  439pp.  Main Library E78.S7 L45 2009  : Lekson, a preeminent archaeologist at the Univ. of Colorado Museum of Natural History, has written a book conceived to appeal to both professional and general audiences. His writing style is lively, perhaps engaging. There are more than 40 illustrations of reconstructed Southwestern towns. Yet this is a disquieting volume, self-indulgent and referential--something general readers may not notice, but that archaeologists will find hard to ignore. The book's purpose is to provide a comprehensive, integrative prehistory of the area, along with a review of the development of archaeology since the mid-19th century. The interpretations are sweeping, and Lekson's voice is authentic, if not authoritarian. Cultural units operate at regional scales, with successive geographic florescence followed by diminishment and political leaderships that never seem to get it quite right. This is also a history largely devoid of environmental considerations, hence, a socially focused narrative. Archaeologists too are larger than life, with rivalries, coalitions, and battles for interpretive dominion. Despite 100 pages of endnotes, there is no way to know how much of this history Lekson has gotten right. Regardless, the story of the ancient Southwest and those who study its history makes for a fascinating tale.

History of the Ojibway People / William W. Warren ; edited and annotated, with a new introduction by Theresa Schenck. St. Paul : Minnesota Historical Society Press, c2009.  2nd edition, 316pp.  Main Library E99.C6 W32 2009 : William W. Warren's History of the Ojibway People has long been recognized as a classic source on Ojibwe History and culture. Warren, the son of an Ojibwe woman, wrote his history in the hope of saving traditional stories for posterity even as he presented to the American public a sympathetic view of a people he believed were fast disappearing under the onslaught of a corrupt frontier populaton. He collected firsthand descriptions and stories from relatives, tribal leaders, and acquaintances and transcribed this oral history in terms that nineteenth-century whites could understand, focusing on warfare, tribal organizations, and political leaders....First published in 1885 by the Minnesota Historical Society, the book has also been cirticized by Native and non-Native scholars, many of whom do not take into account Warren's perspective, goals, and limitations. Now, for the first time since its initial publication, it is made available with new annotations researched and written by professor Theresa Schenck. A new introduction by Schenck also gives a clear and concise history of the text and of the author, firmly establishing a place for William Warren in the tradition of American Indian intellectual thought.

Hollywood's Indian : the portrayal of the Native American in film / edited by Peter C. Rollins and John E. O'Connor.  Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c1998, c2003.  250pp.  Main Library PN1995.9.I48 H66 2003 : In light of recent inattention to the Western genre, the appearance of this volume is welcome. Recognizing the affirmative power of motion pictures "to define [and valorize] the Indian past in dramatic cinematic terms," the collection addresses the ways that mainstream cultural ideologies have nonetheless driven screen portrayals of indigenous peoples. Amply illustrated, the anthology contains 12 essays ranging from basic surveys of images of Native Americans in the movies to more focused readings of such key films as Broken Arrow, The Vanishing American, Tell Them Willie Boy Is Here, and Powwow Highway. As a whole, the essays are useful, enabling readers to construct a cinematic chronology of the Hollywood Indian and to comprehend the larger cultural forces at work interpreting the Indian-white past on screen. Some contributions--e.g., Hannu Saimi's piece on Westerns made in Finland and Pauline Turner Strong's on Pocahantas and The Indian in the Cupboard--extend and enrich the reader's sense of the genre. A number of the essays provide insightful postcolonial perspectives on mythologies of the frontier.  [ film ]

Honoring Elders : Aging, Authority, and Ojibwe Religion / Michael D. McNally.  New York : Columbia University Press, c2009.  382pp. Main Library E99.C6 M346 2009 : Like many Native Americans, Ojibwe people esteem the wisdom, authority, and religious significance of old age, but this respect does not come easily or naturally. It is the fruit of hard work, rooted in narrative traditions, moral vision, and ritualized practices of decorum that are comparable in sophistication to those of Confucianism. Even as the dispossession and policies of assimilation have threatened Ojibwe peoplehood and have targeted the traditions and the elders who embody it, Ojibwe and other Anishinaabe communities have been resolute and resourceful in their disciplined respect for elders. Indeed, the challenges of colonization have served to accentuate eldership in new ways....Using archival and ethnographic research, Michael D. McNally follows the making of Ojibwe eldership, showing that deference to older women and men is part of a fuller moral, aesthetic, and cosmological vision connected to the ongoing circle of life& mdash;a tradition of authority that has been crucial to surviving colonization. McNally argues that the tradition of authority and the authority of tradition frame a decidedly indigenous dialectic, eluding analytic frameworks of invented tradition and naïve continuity. Demonstrating the rich possibilities of treating age as a category of analysis, McNally provocatively asserts that the elder belongs alongside the priest, prophet, sage, and other key figures in the study of religion.

How the Indians lost their land : law and power on the frontier / Stuart Banner.  Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005.  344pp.  E98.L3 B36 2005 : Between the early seventeenth century and the early twentieth, nearly all the land in the United States was transferred from American Indians to whites. This dramatic transformation has been understood in two very different ways--as a series of consensual transactions, but also as a process of violent conquest. Both views cannot be correct. How did Indians actually lose their land?...Stuart Banner provides the first comprehensive answer. He argues that neither simple coercion nor simple consent reflects the complicated legal history of land transfers. Instead, time, place, and the balance of power between Indians and settlers decided the outcome of land struggles. As whites' power grew, they were able to establish the legal institutions and the rules by which land transactions would be made and enforced....This story of America's colonization remains a story of power, but a more complex kind of power than historians have acknowledged. It is a story in which military force was less important than the power to shape the legal framework within which land would be owned. As a result, white Americans--from eastern cities to the western frontiers--could believe they were buying land from the Indians the same way they bought land from one another. How the Indians Lost Their Land dramatically reveals how subtle changes in the law can determine the fate of a nation, and our understanding of the past.

Note : Always check status to make sure book is available for use.  If status indicates In Process, ask for book at Circulation Desk.

Featured Books, I

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status.  If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

"I Am a Man" : Chief Standing Bear's Journey for Justice / Joe Starita.  New York : St. Martin's Press, 2009.  257pp.  Main Library E99.P7 S837 2009 : In 1877, Chief Standing Bear’s Ponca Indian tribe was forcibly removed from their Nebraska homeland and marched to what was then known as Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), in what became the tribe’s own Trail of Tears. “I Am a Man” chronicles what happened when Standing Bear set off on a six-hundred-mile walk to return the body of his only son to their traditional burial ground. Along the way, it examines the complex relationship between the United States government and the small, peaceful tribe and the legal consequences of land swaps and broken treaties, while never losing sight of the heartbreaking journey the Ponca endured. It is a story of survival---of a people left for dead who arose from the ashes of injustice, disease, neglect, starvation, humiliation, and termination. On another level, it is a story of life and death, despair and fortitude, freedom and patriotism. A story of Christian kindness and bureaucratic evil. And it is a story of hope---of a people still among us today, painstakingly preserving a cultural identity that had sustained them for centuries before their encounter with Lewis and Clark in the fall of 1804....Before it ends, Standing Bear’s long journey home also explores fundamental issues of citizenship, constitutional protection, cultural identity, and the nature of democracy---issues that continue to resonate loudly in twenty-first-century America. It is a story that questions whether native sovereignty, tribal-based societies, and cultural survival are compatible with American democracy. Standing Bear successfully used habeas corpus, the only liberty included in the original text of the Constitution, to gain access to a federal court and ultimately his freedom. This account aptly illuminates how the nation’s delicate system of checks and balances worked almost exactly as the Founding Fathers envisioned, a system arguably out of whack and under siege today....Joe Starita’s well-researched and insightful account reads like historical fiction as his careful characterizations and vivid descriptions bring this piece of American history brilliantly to life.

"I do not apologize for the length of this letter" : the Mari Sandoz letters on Native American rights, 1940-1965 / introduced and edited by Kimberli A. Lee ; foreword by John R. Wunder.  Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University Press, c2009.  197pp.  Main Library and Faculty Collection (1 West) E78.G73 S25 2009 : A voice as resonant as her love of the Plains, a commitment even deeper....Author Mari Sandoz was as passionate about Plains peoples as she was about language and literary acclaim. That the mastery of Crazy Horse's biographer spilled into her zealous advocacy for Native Americans is scarcely surprising. An avid letter writer, Sandoz kept carbons of everything. Fortunately these came into the Sandoz Collection at the University of Nebraska Archives, organized by Kimberli Lee, foremost expert on Sandoz's writings....Through the activist correspondence, Lee traces an intimate, long-standing interaction with tribal communities, for whom Sandoz vigorously sought social justice. Sandoz was not above using her celebrity as leverage, yet the letters prove her a respectful and responsible ally, sensitive to the communities' best interests and solicitous of Native leaders....Though Sandoz richly deserves attention, recent scholarship is scant. In arranging and analyzing this correspondence, Lee reinstates Sandoz as one of the most significant non-Native chroniclers and advocates for Plains Indian cultures. There is much here for historians and other scholars of American Indian, Great Plains, rhetorical, and women's studies. Yet Sandoz's wider fan base should not be surprised to hearken to a voice and ardor they will find well familiar.

In bitterness and in tears : Andrew Jackson's destruction of the Creeks and Seminoles / Sean Michael O'Brien.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2003.  254pp.  Main Library E381 .O27 2003 : O'Brien (an independent historian) recounts the events of the Creek War of 1813-14 and the Seminole War of 1818, and weighs their significance for the course of American history. He specifically considers the influence of these wars on westward expansion, southern slavery, and the forced removal of Native Americans.

Indian Alliances and the Spanish in the Southwest, 750-1750 / William B. Carter.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 2009.  308pp.  Main Library E78.S7 C315 2009 : "When considering the history of the Southwest, scholars have typically viewed Apaches, Navajos, and other Athapaskans as marauders who preyed on Pueblo towns and Spanish settlements. William B. Carter now offers a multilayered reassessment of historical events and environmental and social change to show how mutually supportive networks among Native peoples created alliances in the centuries before and after Spanish settlement." "Combining recent scholarship on southwestern prehistory and the history of northern New Spain, Carter describes how environmental changes shaped American Indian settlement in the Southwest and how Athapaskan and Puebloan peoples formed alliances that endured until the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 and even afterward. Established initially for trade, Pueblo-Athapaskan ties deepened with intermarriage and developments in the political realities of the region. Carter also shows how Athapaskans influenced Pueblo economies far more than previously supposed, and helped to erode Spanish influence." "In clearly explaining Native prehistory, Carter integrates clan origins with archaeological data and historical accounts. He then shows how the Spanish conquest of New Mexico affected Native populations and the relations between them. His analysis of the Pueblo Revolt reveals that Athapaskan and Puebloan peoples were in close contact, underscoring the instrumental role that Athapaskan allies played in Native anticolonial resistance in New Mexico throughout the seventeenth century." Written to appeal to both students and general readers, this fresh interpretation of borderlands ethnohistory provides a broad view as well as important insights for assessing subsequent socialchange in the region.

Indian Blues : American Indians and the Politics of Music, 1879-1934 / John W. Troutman.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  323pp.  Main Library E98.D2 T76 2009 : While it is incredibly rare for an author's first published work to be of great significance, Troutman (Univ. of Louisiana, Lafayette) has done exactly that with this most imaginative and intellectually original book, which explores the historic roles of Native American music and dance in Indian culture from the Progressive Era to the dawn of the New Deal. Covering topics that include 19th-century reservation ceremonies, Indian brass bands at boarding schools, and professional Indian traveling performance shows, the author enlightens and engages readers with great storytelling buttressed by a masterful command of subject. There are many impressive features about this stimulating book that readers will appreciate. Troutman delivers a riveting analysis of the interplay between the complex politics of powwows and the powerful forms of performance art that are the centerpieces of the gatherings. Additionally, throughout the book he presents the relationship between the expressive arts and Native American resistance in a most persuasive manner.

The Indian Craze : Primitivism, Modernism, and Transculturation in American Art, 1890-1915 / Elizabeth Hutchinson.  Durham [NC] : Duke University Press, 2009.  277pp.  Main Library E98.A7 H88 2009 : Hutchinson (Barnard) offers an extensively researched, well-written work on the widespread collecting of Native American art from 1890 to 1915--the "Indian craze" that developed among concerned American (and some European) citizens who feared this culture was disappearing from the face of the earth. Private collections of Indian art graced many summer homes of the rich and famous, and Indian trade goods were sold in US department stores. Stereotypes of Indian life and culture abounded; e.g., everyone was a bead-, basket- and blanket-making Plains Indian. Although this blossoming immersion into mainstream culture was limited by ethnic identity, Hutchinson argues that the Indian craze was a significant artistic phenomenon that had lasting effects on both US art history and US Indian policies. Mainstream artists discovered Indian arts and traditions; the tenet of this "antimodernism" was integration of art with life and away from industrial, non-natural forms. A reevaluation of primitive art grew from this transcultural phenomenon that brought Indians and non-Indians together to create a hybrid modernist aesthetic movement with implications for today's artists. Although it would have benefited from more color illustrations, this well-crafted, innovative, and readable work is a must for any serious collection of American art history.

Indian gaming & tribal sovereignty : the casino compromise / Steven Andrew Light & Kathryn R.L. Rand.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2005.  240pp.  Main Library E98.G18 L54 2005 : Light and Rand describe today's Indian gaming industry and examine some of the complex political issues involved. They also offer specific recommendations for tribal, federal, state, and local policymakers that can help them achieve shared goals and interests while recognizing tribal sovereignty.

Indian Slavery in Colonial America / edited and with an introduction by Alan Gallay.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009. 440pp.  E98.S6 I53 2009 : European enslavement of American Indians began with Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World. The slave trade expanded with European colonies, and though African slave labor filled many needs, huge numbers of America's indigenous peoples continued to be captured and forced to work as slaves. Although central to the process of colony-building in what became the United States, this phenomena has received scant attention from historians....Indian Slavery in Colonial America examines the complicated dynamics of Indian enslavement. How and why Indians became both slaves of the Europeans and suppliers of slavery's victims is the subject of this book. The essays in this collection use Indian slavery as a lens through which to explore both Indian and European societies and their interactions, as well as relations between and among Native groups.

Indian Tribes of Oklahoma : a Guide / Blue Clark.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  413pp.  Main Library E78.O45 C575 2009 : Oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and it includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as "Indian Country." For more than half a century readers have turned to Muriel H. Wright's A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma as the authoritative source for information on the state's Native peoples. Now Blue Clark, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian Country in recent years....As a synthesis of current knowledge, this book places the state's Indians in their contemporary context as no other book has done. Solidly grounded in scholarship and Native oral tradition, it provides general readers the unique story of each tribe, from the Alabama-Quassartes to the Yuchis. Each entry contains a complete statistical and narrative summary of the tribe, encompassing everything from origin tales and archaeological research to contemporary ceremonies and tribal businesses. The entries also include tribal websites and suggested readings, along with photographs depicting prominent tribal personages, visitor sites, and accomplishments.

Indian wars : the campaign for the American West / Bill Yenne.  Yardley, Penn. : Westholme Publishing c2006.  325pp.  Main Library E81 .Y46 2006 : The Indian wars remain the most misunderstood campaign ever waged by the U. S. Army. From the first sustained skirmishes west of the Mississippi River in the 1850s to the sweeping clashes of hundreds of soldiers and warriors along the upper plains decades later, these wars consumed most of the active duty resources of the army for the greater part of the nineteenth century and resulted in the disruption of nearly all of the native cultures in the West. Yet the popular understanding of the Indian wars is marred by stereotypes and misinformation as well as a tendency to view these individual wars—the battles against the Sioux, the Cheyenne, the Nez Perce, the Apache, and other groups—as distinct incidents rather than parts of a single overarching campaign. Dispelling notions that American Indians were simply attempting to stop encroachment on their homelands or that they shared common views on how to approach the Europeans, Bill Yenne explains in Indian Wars: The Campaign for the American West, that these wars, fought for more than five decades across a landscape the size of continental Europe, were part of a general long-term strategy by the U. S. Army to control the West as well as extensions of conflicts among native peoples that predated European contact. Complete with a general history of Indian and European relations from the earliest encounters to the opening of the west, and featuring legendary figures from both sides, including Crazy Horse, Chief Joseph, Sitting Bull, Geronimo, George Custer, Kit Carson, and George Crook, Indian Wars allows the reader to better understand the sequence of events that transformed the West and helped define the American temperament.

Indian Work : Language and Livelihood in Native American History / Daniel H. Usner, Jr.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  202pp.  Main Library E98.E2 U85 2009 : Representations of Indian economic life have played an integral role in discourses about poverty, social policy, and cultural difference but have received surprisingly little attention. Daniel Usner dismantles ideological characterizations of Indian livelihood to reveal the intricacy of economic adaptations in American Indian history....Officials, reformers, anthropologists, and artists produced images that exacerbated Indians’ economic uncertainty and vulnerability. From Jeffersonian agrarianism to Jazz Age primitivism, European American ideologies not only obscured Indian struggles for survival but also operated as obstacles to their success. Diversification and itinerancy became economic strategies for many Indians, but were generally maligned in the early United States. Indians repeatedly found themselves working in spaces that reinforced misrepresentation and exploitation. Taking advantage of narrow economic opportunities often meant risking cultural integrity and personal dignity: while sales of baskets made by Louisiana Indian women contributed to their identity and community, it encouraged white perceptions of passivity and dependence. When non-Indian consumption of Indian culture emerged in the early twentieth century, even this friendlier market posed challenges to Indian labor and enterprise. The consequences of this dilemma persist today....Usner reveals that Indian engagement with commerce has consistently defied the narrow choices that observers insisted upon seeing.

Indians and emigrants : encounters on the overland trails / Michael L. Tate.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2006.  328pp.  E78.W5 T38 2006 : The image of wagon trains under relentless attack by Native Americans differs markedly, notes Tate (history and Native American studies, U. of Nebraska at Omaha) from the historical reality where there were far more incidents of cooperation than conflict. In this history of Native American relations with the overland emigrants to the West, he describes this reality, discussing economic and cultural relations. He does discuss incidents of conflict and mistrust, describing how they grew after the 1850s due to stresses on resources from massive migration and sovereignty challenges from new treaty obligations, but nevertheless noting how amity and cooperation largely remained the rule.

The Indians of Iowa / by Lance M. Foster.  Iowa City : University of Iowa Press, c2009. 145pp.  E78.I6 F67 2009 : Many different Indian tribes have lived in Iowa, each existing as an independent nation with its own history, culture, language, and traditions. Some were residents before recorded time; some lived in Iowa for relatively short periods but played memorable roles in the state’s history; others visited Iowa mostly during hunting trips or times of war. Stimulating and informative, Lance Foster’s The Indians of Iowa is the only book for the general reader that covers the archaeology, history, and culture of all the different native nations that have called Iowa home from prehistory to the present....Foster begins with a history of Lewis and Clark’s travels along the Missouri River adjacent to western Iowa. Next, he focuses on the tribes most connected to Iowa from prehistoric times to the present day: the Ioway, Meskwaki, Sauk, Omaha and Ponca, Otoe and Missouria, Pawnee and Arikara, Potawatomi, Illinois Confederacy, Santee and Yankton Sioux, and Winnebago. In between each tribal account, “closer look” essays provide details on Indian women in Iowa, traditional ways of life, Indian history and spirituality, languages and place-names, archaeology, arts and crafts, and houses and landscapes. Finally, Foster brings readers into the present with chapters called “Going to a Powwow,” “Do You Have Indian Blood?” and “Indians in Iowa Today.” The book ends with information about visiting Native American museums, historic sites, and communities in Iowa as well as tribal contacts and a selection of published and online resources....The story of the Indians of Iowa is long and complicated. Illustrated with maps and stunning original art, Lance Foster’s absorbing, accessible overview of Iowa’s Indian tribes celebrates the rich native legacy of the Hawkeye State. It is essential reading for students, teachers, and everyone who calls Iowa home.

Indigenous Methodologies : Characteristics, Conversations, and Contexts / Margaret KovachToronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2009.  201pp.  Main Library E76.7 .K68 2009 : What are Indigenous research methodologies, and how do they unfold? These are the focal considerations of Margaret Kovach's study,which offers guidance to those conducting research in the academy using Indigenous methodologies.

Inheriting the Past : the Making of Arthur C. Parker and Indigenous Archaeology / Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh ; with a foreword by Tracey L. Pierre.  268pp.  Main Library E76.45.P36 C656 2009 : In recent years, archaeologists and Native American communities have struggled to find common ground even though more than a century ago a man of Seneca descent raised on New York's Cattaraugus Reservation, Arthur C. Parker, joined the ranks of professional archaeology. Until now, Parker's life and legacy as the first Native American archaeologist have been neither closely studied nor widely recognized. At a time when heated debates about the control of Native American heritage have come to dominate archaeology, Parker's experiences form a singular lens to view the field's tangled history and current predicaments with Indigenous peoples....In Inheriting the Past, Chip Colwell-Chanthaphonh examines Parker's winding career path and asks why it has taken generations for Native peoples to follow in his footsteps. Closely tracing Parker's life through extensive archival research, Colwell-Chanthaphonh explores how Parker crafted a professional identity and negotiated dilemmas arising from questions of privilege, ownership, authorship, and public participation. How Parker, as well as the discipline more broadly, chose to address the conflict between Native American rights and the pursuit of scientific discovery ultimately helped form archaeology's moral community....Parker's rise in archaeology just as the field was taking shape demonstrates that Native Americans could have found a place in the scholarly pursuit of the past years ago and altered its trajectory. Instead, it has taken more than a century to articulate the promise of an Indigenous archaeology—an archaeological practice carried out by, for, and with Native peoples. As the current generation of researchers exploresnew possibilities of inclusiveness, Parker's struggles and successes serve as a singular reference point to reflect on archaeology's history and its future.

Inkpaduta : Dakota leader / Paul N. Beck.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.  188pp.  Main Library E99.D1 I357 2008 : As a child in Minnesota, Beck learned that Inkpaduta, who died about 1879, was a madman whose only passion was murdering white settlers. As a scholar, he learned that Dakotas of Inkpaduta's time and his own consider him a leader who refused to sell his tribal lands and fought to protect them, a loving father, and a man who could act recklessly at times but mostly remained at peace with whites, and who just wanted to live in traditional ways. He tells as much of the leader's life as he can find evidence for.

Note : Always check status to make sure book is available for use.  If status indicates In Process, ask for book at Circulation Desk.

Featured Books, J-L

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status.  If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

Julius Seyler and the Blackfeet : an impressionist at Glacier National Park / William E. Farr.  Norman, Okla. : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  259pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection folio ND588.S454 F37 2009  : Farr presents an intertwined history of German impressionist artist Seyler, of Glacier National Park--where the artist spent two summers in 1913 and 1914, and of Blackfeet culture, with which Seyler became so intimately involved that he was adopted into the tribe. Although Seyler enjoyed recognition in Europe in his day, wartime destruction of his works relegated him to obscurity, a state that may begin to be rectified with this oversize volume (9.5x12.5"). Generous presentation of reproductions (some 100 images) combined with extensive narrative text showcase his work and the context. His style of painting--abstracted, expressive, and technically sophisticated--is notably distinct from the realism that dominated depictions of the West in his day.

Keeping the Campfires Going : Native Women's Activism in Urban Communities / edited by Susan Applegate Krouse and Heather A. Howard.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  203pp.  Main Library and MSU Faculty Collection E98.W8 K446 2009 : The essays in this groundbreaking anthology highlight the accomplishments of and challenges confronting Native women activists in American and Canadian cities. Since World War II, indigenous women from many communities have stepped forward through organizations, in their families, or by themselves to take action on behalf of the growing number of Native people living in urban areas. This collection recounts and assesses the struggles, successes, and legacies of several of these women in cities across North America, from San Francisco to Toronto, Vancouver to Chicago, and Seattle to Milwaukee. These wide-ranging and insightful essays illuminate Native communities in cities as well as the women activists working to build them.

Killing the Indian maiden : images of Native American women in film / M. Elise Marubbio.  Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2006.  298pp.  Main Library PN1995.9.I48 M37 2006 : Marubbio  surveys images of Native American women in films of the 20th century and, in her conclusion, into the 21st. She identifies three archetypal constructions and so names the book's three sections: "The Celluloid Princess," "The Sexualized Maiden," and "The Hybrid Celluloid Maiden." Basing her analysis on the groundbreaking work of frontier scholars such as Annette Kolodny and Richard Slotkin, the author extends paradigms of the feminine and the Other into a colonial framework in which cinema engages in a racial project that does the ideological work of oppression and colonial appropriation. She begins with silent films (images that often negotiate between savagism and civilization) and moves into the 1930s. Her strongest chapters analyze the Western as it emerged in the 1940s and continued into the 1950s-60s. Here Marubbio explores the tensions between the celluloid princess and the sexualized maiden as she critiques the films as "social narratives and politically inspired works of art that inform us about our society's fears, desires, politics, conflicts, and structures of power." Marubbio's study, with its careful scholarship, is a welcome, valuable addition to the discussion of images of Native Americans. Collections of popular culture or film history are incomplete without it. [ film ]

The land has memory : indigenous knowledge, native landscapes, and the National Museum of the American Indian / edited by Duane Blue Spruce and Tanya Thrasher.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press , c2008.  166pp.  Main Library E98.B7 L36 2008 : In the heart of Washington, D.C., a centuries-old landscape has come alive in the twenty-first century through a re-creation of the natural environment as the region's original peoples might have known it. Unlike most plantings that surround other museums on the National Mall, the landscape around the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) is itself a living exhibit, carefully created to reflect indigenous ways of thinking about the land and its uses....Abundantly illustrated, The Land Has Memory offers beautiful images of the museum's natural environment in every season as well as the uniquely designed building itself. Essays by museum staff and others involved in the museum's creation provide an examination of indigenous peoples' long and varied relationship to the land in the Americas, an account of the museum designers' efforts to reflect traditional knowledge in the design of individual landscape elements, detailed descriptions of the 150 native plant species used, and an exploration of how the landscape changes seasonally. The Land Has Memory serves not only as an attractive and informative keepsake for museum visitors, but also as a thoughtful representation of how traditional indigenous ways of knowing can be put into practice.

Landscapes of Origin in the Americas : Creation Narratives Linking Ancient Places and Present Communities / edited by Jessica Joyce Christie.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2009.  203pp.  Main Library  E61 .L226 2009 : Landscape is a powerful factor in the operation of memory because of the associations narrators make between the local landscape and the events of the stories they tell. Ancestors and mythological events often become fixed in a specific landscape and act as timeless reference points....In conventional anthropological literature, "landscape" is the term applied to the meaning local people bestow on their cultural and physical surroundings. In this work, the authors explore the cultural and physical landscapes an individual or cultural group has constructed to define the origins or beginnings of that cultural group as revealed through shared or traditional memory. The cultural landscapes of origins in diverse sites throughout the Americas are investigated through multidisciplinary research, not only to reveal the belief system and mythologies but also to place these origin beliefs in context and relationship to each other. In a continual interaction between the past, present, and future, time is subordinate to place, and history, as defined in Western academic terms, does not exist.

Language of the robe : American Indian trade blankets / Robert W. Kapoun with Charles J. Lohrmann.  Layton, Utah : Gibbs Smith, [1997]  179pp.  Main Library E98.C8 K36 1997 : For all Native American cultures, from the Plains and Southwest people to the tribes of the Northwest Coast, the blanket makes a visual statement of "Indianness." Language of the Robe explains a living tradition among the Native American people. Today, trade blankets are collectibles, especially those that were made prior to World War II. Language of the Robe identifies, classifies, and presents the history of the trade blanket....Within the tribe or pueblo, the blanket is a statement of an individual's bond to the older, traditional ways, to roots that run deep. As a gift, the blanket is an important acknowledgement of friendship, gratitude and respect....Bright colors and intricately woven patterns are the hallmarks of the American Indian trade blankets. Even though the blankets were commercially produced by companies such as the famous Pendleton Woolen Mills, they were embraced by Native American peoples across the country and became an integral part of their culture and ceremonies.

The Last Indian War : the Nez Perce Story / Elliott West.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  397pp.  Main Library E83.877 .W47 2009 : This newest volume in Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments series offers an unforgettable portrait of the Nez Perce War of 1877, the last great Indian conflict in American history. It was, as Elliott West shows, a tale of courage and ingenuity, of desperate struggle and shattered hope, of short-sighted government action and a doomed flight to freedom....To tell the story, West begins with the early history of the Nez Perce and their years of friendly relations with white settlers. In an initial treaty, the Nez Perce were promised a large part of their ancestral homeland, but the discovery of gold led to a stampede of settlement within the Nez Perce land. Numerous injustices at the hands of the US government combined with the settlers' invasion to provoke this most accomodating of tribes to war. West offers a riveting account of what came next: the harrowing flight of 800 Nez Perce, including many women, children and elderly, across 1500 miles of mountainous and difficult terrain. He gives a full reckoning of the campaigns and battles--and the unexpected turns, brilliant stratagems, and grand heroism that occurred along the way. And he brings to life the complex characters from both sides of the conflict, including cavalrymen, officers, politicians, and--at the center of it all--the Nez Perce themselves (the Nimiipuu, "true people"). The book sheds light on the war's legacy, including the near sainthood that was bestowed upon Chief Joseph, whose speech of surrender, "I will fight no more forever," became as celebrated as the Gettysburg Address....Based on a rich cache of historical documents, from government and military records to contemporary interviews and newspaper reports, The Last Indian War offers a searing portrait of a moment when the American identity--who was and who was not a citizen--was being forged.

Learning to write "Indian" : the boarding-school experience and American Indian literature / Amelia V. Katanski.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2005.  274pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 K38 2005 : The late-19th-century Native American boarding school was considered central to the assimilation of the American Indian. Viewing the boarding school as a pan-Indian experience, this fine book focuses on the literary production of that period and of the early 20th century. Katanski (Kalamazoo College) pays special attention to the Carlisle Indian School, which was the best-publicized model of Native boarding-school experience. She also includes detailed discussions of the autobiographical writings of Native American writers Charles Eastman and Gertrude Bonnin. She explores the creation of an "Indian" voice and creates a theoretical framework which sees the students as negotiating and mediating the demands of bicultural experience so as to create a repertoire of identity positions that allowed them to change but retain their sense of cultural identity. Katanski also surveys the impact of boarding-school literature on contemporary Native American literature and documents its influence as well as the continuation of bicultural strategies. This book makes a substantial and lasting contribution to the study of Native American literature and education.

Lewis and Clark through Indian eyes / edited by Alvin M. Josephy, Jr. ; with Marc Jaffe.  New York : Knopf, 2006. 196pp.  Main Library F592.4 2006 : For the first time in the two hundred years since Lewis and Clark led their expedition from St. Louis to the Pacific, we hear the other side of the story—as we listen to nine descendants of the Indians whose homelands were traversed. ...Among those who speak: Newspaper editor Mark Trahant writes of his childhood belief that he was descended from Clark and what his own research uncovers. Award-winning essayist and fiction writer Debra Magpie Earling describes the tribal ways that helped her nineteenth-century Salish ancestors survive, and that still work their magic today. Montana political figure Bill Yellowtail tells of the efficiency of Indian trade networks, explaining how axes that the expedition traded for food in the Mandan and Hidatsa villages of Kansas had already arrived in Nez Perce country by the time Lewis and Clark got there a few months and 1,000 miles later. Umatilla tribal leader Roberta Conner compares Lewis and Clark’s journal entries about her people with what was actually going on, wittily questioning Clark’s notion that the natives believed the white men “came from the clouds”—in other words, they were gods. Writer and artist N. Scott Momaday ends the book with a moving tribute to the “most difficult of journeys,” calling it, in the truest sense, for both the men who entered the unknown and those who watched, “a vision quest,” with the “visions gained being of profound consequence.”...Some of the essays are based on family stories, some on tribal or American history, still others on the particular circumstances of a tribe today—but each reflects the expedition’s impact through the prism of the author’s own, or the tribe’s, point of view....Thoughtful, moving, provocative, Lewis and Clark Through Indian Eyes is an exploration of history—and a study of survival—that expands our knowledge of our country’s first inhabitants. It also provides a fascinating and invaluable new perspective on the Lewis and Clark expedition itself and its place in the long history of our continent.

The Life and Times of Reverend Stephen Foreman / by Cooleela Faulkner ; foreword by Jack D. Baker.  Tahlequah, Okla. : Cherokee Hertiage Press, c2006.  258pp.  Main Library E99.C5 F67 2006  : Stephen Foreman, born in 1807, was the son of a white father and a Cherokee mother. Like many mixed-blood children who became future leaders in the Cherokee Nation, he attended mission schools and then furthered his education in the northeast. Upon his return to the CherokeeNation, he began his long service to the Cherokee People.

The Lipan Apaches : people of wind and lightning / Thomas A. Britten. Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2009. 336pp.  Main Library E99.L5 B75 2009 : This well-written volume traces the history of the Lipan Apaches from the era of pre-European contact to the present, with special emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries. It was during those two centuries that the Lipan people became a formidable presence in the Southwest, especially in Texas. The volume also surveys this tribe's gradual decline in the early 20th century, closing with a short discussion of current attempts to have the remnant secure federal recognition. Britten, who has written two previous books dealing with Native Americans in the region, provides a readable narrative that offers a well-crafted overview. His sources include an array of primary documents, including archives in Mexico and Texas, along with a number of published materials and government documents. In addition, the secondary source base comprehends all of the important articles and books dealing with Lipan Apaches. This book, written from the Lipan historical viewpoint, will provide readers with a solid, timely, and accurate synthesis of this significant group of southwestern Native Americans, who were so important to the region's history.

Lt. Charles Gatewood & his Apache wars memoir / Charles B. Gatewood ; edited and with additional text by Louis Kraft.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2005.  283pp.  Main Library E99.A6 G27 2005 : Lt. Charles B. Gatewood (1853–1896), an educated Virginian, served in the Sixth U.S. Cavalry as the commander of Indian scouts. Gatewood was largely accepted by the Native peoples with whom he worked because of his efforts to understand their cultures. It was this connection that Gatewood formed with the Indians, and with Geronimo and Naiche in particular, that led to his involvement in the last Apache war and his work for Indian rights....Realizing that he had more experience dealing with Native peoples than other lieutenants serving on the frontier, Gatewood decided to record his experiences. Although he died before he completed his project, the work he left behind remains an important firsthand account of his life as a commander of Apache scouts and as a military commandant of the White Mountain Indian Reservation. Louis Kraft presents Gatewood’s previously unpublished account, punctuating it with an introduction, additional text that fills in the gaps in Gatewood’s narrative, detailed notes, and an epilogue. Kraft’s work offers new background information on Gatewood and discusses the manuscript as a fresh account of how Gatewood viewed the events in which he took part.

Note : Always check status to make sure book is available for use.  If status indicates In Process, ask for book at Circulation Desk.

Featured New Books, M-O

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status.  If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

Making the white man's Indian : native Americans and Hollywood movies / Angela Aleiss.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, c2005.  211pp.  PN1995.9.I48 A44 2005 : The image in Hollywood movies of savage Indians attacking white settlers represents only one side of a very complicated picture. In fact sympathetic portrayals of Native Americans stood alongside those of hostile Indians in the silent films of D. W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, and flourished during the early 1930s with Hollywood's cycle of pro-Indian adventures. Decades later, the stereotype became even more complicated, as films depicted the savagery of whites (The Searchers) in contrast to the more "peaceful" Indian (Broken Arrow). By 1990 the release of Dances with Wolves appeared to have recycled the romantic and savage portrayals embedded in early cinema. In this new study, author Angela Aleiss traces the history of Native Americans on the silver screen, and breaks new ground by drawing on primary sources such as studio correspondence, script treatments, trade newspapers, industry censorship files, and filmmakers' interviews to reveal how and why Hollywood created its Indian characters. Behind-the-scenes anecdotes of filmmakers and Native Americans, as well as rare archival photographs, supplement the discussion, which often shows a stark contrast between depiction and reality. [ film ]

The many faces of Edward Sherriff Curtis : portraits and stories from Native North America / Steadman Upham and Nat Zappia ; photography by Edward Sherriff Curtis ; printmaking by Stephen Schenk and Rani Tagland.  Tulsa, Okla. : Gilcrease Museum and the Thomas Gilcrease Association ; Seattle : University of Washington Press, c2006.  159pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection E89 .C875 2006 : Edward Sheriff Curtis spent more than forty years photographing and documenting the Native peoples of North America, taking more than 40,000 photographs and amassing a staggering archive of documentary material about North American tribes and social groups. While many books have explored the artistic value of the images he created, The Many Faces of Edward Sherriff Curtis: Portraits and Stories from Native North America is the first to document his contributions to the field of anthropology....Edward S. Curtis began documenting the Native peoples of North America in 1889, at a time when the U.S. government had, for the most part, pushed Native Americans onto reservations and was determined to destroy their cultures and social organizations by forcibly removing their children to government boarding schools, by depriving them of the right to speak their languages and practice their religions, and by carving up tribal lands into ever smaller portions and giving away sizable pieces to non-Natives. Curtis believed that his generation might be the last to see and hear these native people in the flesh....Scholars Steadman Upham and Nat Zappia examine eighty of Curtis's portraits of Native Americans within three contexts: the Native American in U.S. history, the history of Native people worldwide during the same period, and the individual subjects, whose portraits are arranged from youngest to oldest. By situating Curtis's work within the larger arena of U.S. and world history, the gravity, determination, humor, and dignity of his portraits become vitally clear. The people he photographed were, in many cases, suffering degradation and hardship, but their faces speak of purpose and hope. More than seventy years after Curtis created his last photograph, these portraits speak not of the "vanishing Indian" he believed he was documenting for posterity, but of the resilience of entire nations, which continue to this day to persist and even to thrive in difficult circumstances.

Mapping the Americas : the Transnational Politics of Contemporary Native Culture / Shari M. Huhndorf.  Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2009.  202pp.  Main Library E98.E85 H84 2009 : Contents - Introduction : Native American studies and the limits of nationalism -- Colonizing Alaska : race, nation, and the remaking of Native America -- "From the inside and through Inuit eyes" : Igloolik Isuma productions and the cultural politics of Inuit media -- Indigenous feminism, performance, and the gendered politics of memory -- Picture revolution : "tribal internationalism" and the future of the Americas in Leslie Marmon Silko's Almanac of the dead -- Coda : border crossings.

Mapping the Mississippian shatter zone : the colonial Indian slave trade and regional instability in the American South / edited by Robbie Ethridge and Sheri M. Shuck-Hall. Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009. 526pp.  Main Library E99.M6815 M36 2009 : During the two centuries following European contact, the world of late prehistoric Mississippian chiefdoms collapsed and Native communities there fragmented, migrated, coalesced, and reorganized into new and often quite different societies. The editors of this volume, Robbie Ethridge and Sheri M. Shuck-Hall, argue that such a period and region of instability and regrouping constituted a “shatter zone.”...In this anthology, archaeologists, ethnohistorians, and anthropologists analyze the shatter zone created in the colonial South by examining the interactions of American Indians and European colonists. The forces that destabilized the region included especially the frenzied commercial traffic in Indian slaves conducted by both Europeans and Indians, which decimated several southern Native communities; the inherently fluid political and social organization of precontact Mississippian chiefdoms; and the widespread epidemics that spread across the South. Using examples from a range of Indian communities—Muskogee, Catawba, Iroquois, Alabama, Coushatta, Shawnee, Choctaw, Westo, and Natchez—the contributors assess the shatter zone region as a whole, and the varied ways in which Native peoples wrestled with an increasingly unstable world and worked to reestablish order.

Medicine bags and dog tags : American Indian veterans from colonial times to the second Iraq War / Al Carroll.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.  287pp.  Main Library E98.M5 C37 2008 : As far back as colonial times, Native individuals and communities have fought alongside European and American soldiers against common enemies. Medicine Bags and Dog Tags is the story of these Native men and women whose military service has defended ancient homelands, perpetuated longstanding warrior traditions, and promoted tribal survival and sovereignty....Drawing on a rich array of archival records and oral traditions, Al Carroll offers the most complete account of Native veterans to date and is the first to take an international approach, drawing comparisons with Native veteran traditions in Canada and Mexico. He debunks the “natural warrior” stereotype as well as the popular assumption that Natives join the military as a refuge against extreme poverty and as a form of assimilation. The reasons for enlistment, he argues, though varied and complex, are invariably connected to the relative strengths of tribal warrior traditions within communities. Carroll provides a fascinating look at how the culture and training of the American military influenced the makeup and tactics of the American Indian Movement in the 1960s and 1970s and how, in turn, Natives have influenced U.S. military tactics, symbolism, and basic training.

Medicine bundle : Indian sacred performance and American literature, 1824-1932 / Joshua David Bellin.  Philadelphia, Pa. : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008.  264pp.  Main Library PS173.I6 B453 2008 : From the 1820s to the 1930s, Christian missionaries and federal agents launched a continent-wide assault against Indian sacred dance, song, ceremony, and healing ritual in an attempt to transform Indian peoples into American citizens. In spite of this century-long religious persecution, Native peoples continued to perform their sacred traditions and resist the foreign religions imposed on them, as well as to develop new practices that partook of both. At the same time, some whites began to explore Indian performance with interest, and even to promote Indian sacred traditions as a source of power for their own society. The varieties of Indian performance played a formative role in American culture and identity during a critical phase in the nation's development....In Medicine Bundle, Joshua David Bellin examines the complex issues surrounding Indian sacred performance in its manifold and intimate relationships with texts and images by both Indians and whites. From the paintings of George Catlin, the traveling showman who exploited Indian ceremonies for the entertainment of white audiences, to the autobiography of Black Elk, the Lakota holy man whose long life included stints as a dancer in Buffalo Bill's Wild West show, a supplicant in the Ghost Dance movement, and a catechist in the Catholic Church, Bellin reframes American literature, culture, and identity as products of encounter with diverse performance traditions. Like the traditional medicine bundle of sacred objects bound together for ritual purposes, Indian performance and the performance of Indianness by whites and Indians alike are joined in a powerful intercultural knot.

Money pitcher : Chief Bender and the tragedy of Indian assimilation / William C. Kashatus. University Park, Pa. : Pennsylvania State University Press, c2006. 199pp.  Main LibraryGV865.B36 K37 2006: By the end of his major league career in 1925, Bender had accrued 212 wins and more than 1,700 strikeouts and in 1953 became the first American Indian elected to baseball's Hall of Fame. This success did not protect him from the trauma of racism, however, and as a result, Kashatus' biography of Bender is both a life history and a study of social justice in America in the early 20th century.

The Moundbuilders : Ancient Peoples of Eastern North America / George Milner. London : Thames & Hudson, 2004. 224pp. Main Library E78.E2 M55 2004 : Nineteenth-century explorers of the American continent were amazed to find great monuments built of earth in the Eastern Woodlands. Thousands of these mounds were discovered in the plains and forestssome up to a hundred feet high, some merely overgrown hillocks, some conical, others flattopped. Speculation was rife as to the identity of the moundbuilderscould they have been Israelites? Romans? Phoenicians? And what meaning might the mounds have held for their creators? As George Milner shows, research over the last century demonstrates conclusively that the mounds were in fact erected by the Native Americans themselves. In a period ranging from 3,000 BC to the sixteenth century AD, Native Americans quarried tons of earth to form these monuments, which vary widely in location, size, and purpose. Some contained thousands of burials, others served as platforms for chiefs' residences, and many were low-lying "effigy" mounds in the form of serpents, panthers, and other sacred beasts. Many beautiful objects have been found inside the mounds, including artifacts of shell, copper, and mica. The Moundbuilders covers the entire sweep of Eastern Woodlands prehistory, with an emphasis on how societies developed from hunter-gatherers to village farmers and town-dwellers. Great strides have been made in recent research, and many of the most impressive mounds, such as Poverty Point, Cahokia, and Moundville, are described and discussed in detail. This wide-ranging and copiously illustrated book, complete with a gazetteer of sites to visit, will be the perfect guide to the region for archaeologists and students as well as for the tourist and traveler. 153 illustrations, 20 in color.

Music of the first nations : tradition and innovation in native North American / edited by Tara Browner.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2009.  166pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML3557 .M87 2009 : This unique anthology presents a wide variety of approaches to an ethnomusicology of Inuit and Native North American musical expression. Contributors include Native and non-Native scholars who provide erudite and illuminating perspectives on aboriginal culture, incorporating both traditional practices and contemporary musical influences. Gathering scholarship on a realm of intense interest but little previous publication, this collection promises to revitalize the study of Native music in North America, an area of ethnomusicology that stands to benefit greatly from these scholars' cooperative, community-oriented methods.

The Natchez Indians : a history to 1735 / James F. Barnett, Jr.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2007.  185pp.  Main Library E99.N2 B37 2007 : This solid, well-written volume is the first scholarly monograph in modern times that deals with the history of the Natchez Indians, a Native group of great importance during the French colonial era in Louisiana. The Natchez inhabited the area surrounding the Mississippi city of the same name, where they found themselves at the crossroads of European exploration along the great river from the time of the Sieur de La Salle to the fateful war they waged against the French during the 1730s. The Natchez suffered a devastating loss in this conflict, which decimated their tribal identity and scattered survivors to a variety of locations. Barnett bases his synthesis on an impressive array of secondary sources and anthropological studies that provide a very sound bibliographic base for his book. The narrative unfolds in four parts: the Natchez before European contact; the era of exploration that began with La Salle; the French colonial period; and finally the Natchez Rebellion of the 1730s that extinguished the tribe. This book represents the first and best starting point for any reader who wishes to undertake a study of the Natchez.

A nation of women : gender and colonial encounters among the Delaware Indians / Gunlög Fur.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.  251pp.  Main Library E99.D2 F87 2009 : A Nation of Women chronicles changing ideas of gender and identity among the Delaware Indians from the mid-seventeenth through the eighteenth century, as they encountered various waves of migrating peoples in their homelands along the eastern coast of North America....In Delaware society at the beginning of this period, to be a woman meant to engage in the activities performed by women, including diplomacy, rather than to be defined by biological sex. Among the Delaware, being a "woman" was therefore a self-identification, employed by both women and men, that reflected the complementary roles of both sexes within Delaware society. For these reasons, the Delaware were known among Europeans and other Native American groups as "a nation of women."...Decades of interaction with these other cultures gradually eroded the positive connotations of being a nation of women as well as the importance of actual women in Delaware society. In Anglo-Indian politics, being depicted as a woman suggested weakness and evil. Exposed to such thinking, Delaware men struggled successfully to assume the formal speaking roles and political authority that women once held. To salvage some sense of gender complementarity in Delaware society, men and women redrew the lines of their duties more rigidly. As the era came to a close, even as some Delaware engaged in a renewal of Delaware identity as a masculine nation, others rejected involvement in Christian networks that threatened to disturb the already precarious gender balance in their social relations....Drawing on all available European accounts, including those in Swedish, German, and English, Fur establishes the centrality of gender in Delaware life and, in doing so, argues for a new understanding of how different notions of gender influenced all interactions in colonial North America.

Native activism in Cold War America : the struggle for sovereignty / Daniel M. Cobb.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2008.  306pp.  Main Library E98.T77 C63 2008 : A common perception of the American Indian activist movement is that it began with the occupation of Alcatraz in 1969. This study by historian Cobb (Miami Univ.) makes the case that the period from the start of the Cold War to 1968 was critical for generating ideas and training a new generation of leaders who brought issues of Indian sovereignty and rights to public attention. Cobb begins by chronicling the Cold War context in which American Indians began to compare their situation with that of colonized peoples, as they struggled against the termination policy of the federal government. He discusses the American Indian Chicago Conference, the significant role that the War on Poverty's Community Action Program played in leadership education, and Indian participation in the Poor People's Campaign of 1968. Throughout, the author explores the intersection of developing Indian protest with the broader Civil Rights Movement. The study treats institutions such as the National Congress of American Indians and the new National Indian Youth Council as well as early activists. In fact, Cobb adds to the literature on this period by presenting vignettes of some two dozen activists whom he personally interviewed.

Native America from prehistory to first contact / Rodney P. Carlisle and J. Geoffrey Golson, editors.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : ABC-CLIO, c2007.  240pp.  Main Library E77.9 .N37 2007 : This work is a fascinating history of precontact North America, presenting the facts and engaging the reader by using alternative history--what if key facts were different?--to help develop critical thinking skills....What if Native Americans had used their overwhelming numbers to expel the first explorers and settlers? What if Mesoamerican Indians had developed better irrigation? This book answers these and other questions in a fascinating treatment of pre-Columbian America, both as it was and as it might have been.

Native American Clothing : an Illustrated History / Theodore Brasser.  Buffalo, New York : Firefly Books, c2009.  368pp.  Fine Arts - Art Collection E98.C8 B73 2009 : Brasser, a retired curator and an expert in the art and design of indigenous North Americans, has picked some 300 examples (from among thousands of artifacts residing in museums and private collections) for this lush, beautiful volume. Brasser breaks the collection into 12 regional groups which represent unique habitats, from the semi-tropical cultures of the Southeast to those of the High Arctic, moving in the direction of European contact, from south to north and from east to west). Each chapter includes a detailed map, the names and localities of various tribal groups, and relevant history, including what is known of pre-contact histories and the region's interaction with Europeans. Throughout, Brasser includes paintings made by European artists (from the early 16th through the mid-19th centuries) illustrating how native peoples were clothed and decorated at the time of initial contact. Historical essays describe a series of mostly tragic events, emphasizing the improbable survival of so many beautiful garments, bowls, rugs, bags, belts, and other artifacts. Featuring an amazing breadth of clothing design, motif, and technique, Brasser's volume makes an excellent cross-collection resource for anyone interested in indigenous art or Native American history. 300 color and b&w photos.

Native American Folktales / edited by Thomas A. Green.  Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009.  167pp.  Main Library E98.F6 N382 2009  : Folktales are at the heart of Native American culture. Prepared especially for students and general readers, this book conveniently collects 31 of the most important Native American folktales. These are drawn from the major Native American cultural and geographical areas and are organized in sections on origins; heroes, heroines, villains, and fools; society and conflict; and the supernatural. The tales reflect the environment, cultural adaptations, and prevailing concerns of the areas from which they are taken. Each tale begins with a brief introductory headnote, and the book closes with a selected bibliography. Students in social studies classes will welcome this book as a window on Native American culture, while students in literature courses will value its exploration of Native American oral traditions.

Native American language ideologies : beliefs, practices, and struggles in Indian country / edited by Paul V. Kroskrity and Margaret C. Field.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2009.  353pp.  Main Library PM108 .N28 2009 : This significant collection encompasses the semiotic notion of language ideology. The chapters focus on indigenous languages of North America but include a Mesoamerican tongue. The contributions treat what people think and feel about the heritage languages they speak or do not speak. Groups vary in how iconic, as opposed to utilitarian, they consider their language to be in relation to ethnicity. Groups within groups (by age, class, competence in the heritage language) also vary on language ideology. Native American heritage languages are in disjunctive trends of language shift, with some virtually moribund and others somewhat more integral as speech communities in spite of ongoing contact with and borrowings from national languages. None of the languages herein, however, seems truly vibrant or non-endangered. The book covers effects of code mixing (Navajo), indexicality and iconicity of language use (Arapaho, Hopi, Paiute), bilingualism (Kiowa-Tanoan and Apachean languages), models of language socialization and disruption (Yukon languages, Shoshoni), Native interest in language revitalization programs (Yukon languages, Western Mono, Shoshoni), and questions of orthography (Kiowa). It is clear that understanding language ideologies is key to any successful language revitalization program.

Native American studies / Clara Sue Kidwell and Alan Velie.  Lincoln [Neb.] : University of Nebraska Press, c2005.  160pp. Main Library E76.6 .K53 2005b : This guide to Native American history and culture outlines new ways of understanding American Indian cultures in contemporary contexts....Covers key issues such as the intimate relationship of culture to land; the nature of cultural exchange and conflict in the period after European contact; the unique relationship of Native communities with the United States government; the significance of language; the vitality of contemporary cultures; and the variety of Native artistic styles, from literature and poetry to painting and sculpture to performance arts....This thematic approach places history, culture, and intellectual production in the contexts of politics and power. Using specific examples throughout the book, the authors portray the culture of Native Americans from the viewpoints of Native people as well as from those of non-Native Americans.

Native American Testimony : a Chronicle of Indian-White Relations From Prophecy to the Present, 1492-2000 / edited by Peter Nabokov ; with a foreword by Vine Deloria, Jr.   New York, N.Y. : Penguin, 1999. Rev. ed.  Main Library E93 .N3 1999 : Revised to bring this important chronicle to the end of the millennium, anthropologist Peter Nabokov presents a history of Native American and white relations as seen though Indian eyes and told through Indian voices. Beginning with the Indians' first encounters with European explorers, traders, missionaries, settlers, and soldiers to the challenges confronting Native American culture today, Native American Testimony is a series of powerful and moving documents spanning five hundred years of interchange between the two peoples. Drawing from a wide range of sources--traditional narratives, Indian autobiographies, government transcripts, firsthand interviews, and more--Nabokov has assembled a remarkably rich and vivid collection, representing nothing less than an alternate history of North America.

Native American Voices : a History and Anthology / edited with an introduction by Stephen MintzSt. James, N.Y. : Brandywine Press, c2000.  2nd enlarged ed., 244pp.  Main Library E77.2 .N38 2000 : An introduction synthesizes the latest anthropological, archaeological, historical, and sociological scholarship and the 95 carefully edited selections provide students with an overview of Native American history from the earliest migrations to the present. The volume includes a chronology, glossary, and bibliography, making it a valuable teaching tool.

Native Americans and Anglo-American culture, 1750-1850 : the Indian Atlantic / edited by Tim Fulford and Kevin Hutchings.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  263pp.  Main Library PR448.I536 N37 2009 : Investigating a transatlantic culture that flourished in Great Britain and North America between 1750 and 1850, this collection explains how complex relationships between Britons, Native Americans and Anglo-Americans shaped the literature and history of the age. This shaping role has all too often been ignored or misconstrued by literary critics and historians. The book's chapters examine literary texts, travel accounts, traders' memoirs, historical documents, captivity narratives, autobiographies, newspaper articles, and visual arts. Its contributors chart the rise and fall of mixed communities living on the margins of white and Indian settlements, examining the role of 'cultural brokers' who used their expertise in both white and Indian cultures to mediate between them. Featuring contributions by some of the leading literary critics and historians currently working in the areas of Romantic Studies, American and Canadian Studies, and Native American Studies, this book sets a new agenda for thinking about transatlantic cultural relations.

Native Americans in Comic Books : A Critical Study / Michael A. Sheyahshe.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2008.  215pp.  Special Collections and Main Library E99.H77 S54 2008 : This work takes an in-depth look at the world of comic books through the eyes of a Native American reader and offers frank commentary on the medium's cultural representation of the Native American people. It addresses a range of portrayals, from the bloodthirsty barbarians and noble savages of dime novels, to formulaic secondary characters and sidekicks, and, occasionally, protagonists sans paternal white hero, examining how and why Native Americans have been consistently marginalized and misrepresented in comics. Chapters cover early representations of Native Americans in popular culture and newspaper comic strips, the Fenimore Cooper legacy, the "white" Indian, the shaman, revisionist portrayals, and Native American comics from small publishers, among other topics.

Native insurgencies and the genocidal impulse in the Americas / Nicholas A. Robins.   Bloomington : Indiana University Press, c2005.  289pp.  Main Library E99.P9 R55 2005 : This book investigates three Indian revolts in the Americas: the 1680 uprising of the Pueblo Indians against the Spanish; the Great Rebellion in Bolivia, 1780--82; and the Caste War of Yucatan that began in 1849 and was not finally crushed until 1903. Nicholas A. Robins examines their causes, course, nature, leadership, and goals. He finds common features: they were revitalization movements that were both millenarian and exterminatory in their means and objectives; they sought to restore native rule and traditions to their societies; and they were movements born of despair and oppression that were sustained by the belief that they would witness the dawning of a new age. His work underscores the link that may be found, but is not inherent, between genocide, millennialism, and revitalization movements in Latin America during the colonial and early national periods.

Native Liberty : Natural Reason and Cultural Survivance / Gerald VizenorLincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2009.  321pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 V6 2009 : Gerald Vizenor was a journalist for the Minneapolis Tribune when he discovered that his direct ancestors were the editor and publisher of The Progress, the first Native newspaper on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota.  Vizenor, inspired by the kinship of nineteenth century Native journalists, has pursued a similar sense of resistance in his reportage, editorial essays, and literary art.  Vizenor reveals in Native Liberty the political, poetic, visionary, and ironic insights of personal identity and narratives of cultural sovereignty. He examines singular acts of resistance, natural reason, literary practices, and other strategies of survivance that evade and subvert the terminal notions of tragedy and victimry.  Native Liberty nurtures survivance and creates a sense of cultural and historical presence. Vizenor, a renowned Anishinaabe literary scholar and artist, writes in a direct narrative style that integrates personal experiences with original presentations, comparative interpretations, and critiques of legal issues and historical situations.

Native North American religious traditions : dancing for life / Jordan Paper.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2007.  189pp.  Main Library E98.R3 P227 2007  : Representative Native American religions and rituals are introduced to readers in a way that respects the individual traditions as more than local curiosities or exotic rituals, capturing the flavor of the living, modern traditions, even as commonalities between and among traditions are explored and explained. This general introduction offers wide-ranging coverage of the major factors--geography, history, religious behavior, and religious ideology (theology)--analyzing select traditions that can be dealt with, to varying degrees, on a contemporary basis.

Native People of Southern New England, 1650-1775 / by Kathleen J. Bragdon.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  293pp.  Main Library E78.N5 B732 2009 : Despite the popular assumption that Native American cultures in New England declined after Europeans arrived, evidence suggests that Indian communities continued to thrive alongside English colonists. In this sequel to her Native People of Southern New England, 1500-1650, Kathleen J. Bragdon continues the Indian story through the end of the colonial era and documents the impact of colonization...As she traces changes in Native social, cultural, and economic life, Bragdon explores what it meant to be Indian in colonial southern New England. Contrary to common belief, Bragdon argues, Indianness meant continuing Native lives and lifestyles, however distinct from those of the newcomers. She recreates Indian cosmology, moral values, community organization, and material culture to demonstrate that networks based on kinship, marriage, traditional residence patterns, and work all fostered a culture resistant to assimilation....Bragdon draws on the writings and reported speech of Indians to counter what colonists claimed to be signs of assimilation. She shows that when Indians adopted English cultural forms--such as Christianity and writing--they did so on their own terms, using these alternative tools for expressing their own ideas about power and the spirit world....Despite warfare, disease epidemics, and colonists' attempts at cultural suppression, distinctive Indian cultures persisted. Bragdon's scholarship gives us new insight into both the history of the tribes of southern New England and the nature of cultural contact.  Civilization of the American Indian series ; v. 259.

The Native population of the Americas in 1492 / edited by William M. DenevanMadison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press ; 1976.  1st edition, 353pp. Main Library E59.P75 N37 ; Note : The second edition, 1992, is available online from the ACLS Humanities E-Book Collection and from our eBrary Academic Complete and EBSCO EBook Academic Collections. :   Research by some scholars provides population estimates of the pre-contact Americas as high as 112 million in 1492, while others estimate the population to have been as low as eight million. In any case, the native population declined to less than five million by 1650. In this collection of essays, historians, anthropologists and historical demographers discuss the discrepancies in the population estimates and the evidence for the post-European decline. Woodrow Borah, Angel Rosenblat and William T. Sanders, among others, examine such topics as the Indian slave trade, disease, military action and the disruption of the social systems of the native peoples. Offering varying points of view, the contributions critically analyse major hemispheric and regional data and estimates for pre- and post-European contact. 

Native speakers : Ella Deloria, Zora Neale Hurston, Jovita González, and the poetics of culture / María Eugenia Cotera.  Austin : University of Texas Press, 2008.  286pp.  Main Library HQ1419 .C683 2008 : In the early twentieth century, three women of color helped shape a new world of ethnographic discovery. Ella Cara Deloria, a Sioux woman from South Dakota, Zora Neale Hurston, an African American woman from Florida, and Jovita González, a Mexican American woman from the Texas borderlands, achieved renown in the fields of folklore studies, anthropology, and ethnolinguistics during the 1920s and 1930s. While all three collaborated with leading male intellectuals in these disciplines to produce innovative ethnographic accounts of their own communities, they also turned away from ethnographic meaning making at key points in their careers and explored the realm of storytelling through vivid mixed-genre novels centered on the lives of women....In this book, Cotera offers an intellectual history situated in the "borderlands" between conventional accounts of anthropology, women's history, and African American, Mexican American and Native American intellectual genealogies. At its core is also a meditation on what it means to draw three women--from disparate though nevertheless interconnected histories of marginalization--into conversation with one another. Can such a conversation reveal a shared history that has been erased due to institutional racism, sexism, and simple neglect? Is there a mode of comparative reading that can explore their points of connection even as it remains attentive to their differences? These are the questions at the core of this book, which offers not only a corrective history centered on the lives of women of color intellectuals, but also a methodology for comparative analysis shaped by their visions of the world.

Natives and academics : researching and writing about American Indians / edited by Devon A. Mihesuah.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1998.  212pp.  Main Library E76.8 .N37 1998  : Ten leading Native scholars examine the state of scholarly research and writing on Native Americans. Their distinctive perspectives and telling arguments lend clarity to the heated debate about the purpose and direction of Native American scholarship....All too frequently, Native Americans have little control over how they and their ancestors are researched and depicted in scholarly writings. The relationship between Native peoples and the academic community has become especially rocky in recent years. Both groups are grappling with troubling questions about research ethics, methodology, and theory in the field and in the classroom....In this timely and illuminating anthology, ten leading Native scholars examine the state of scholarly research and writing on Native Americans. They offer distinctive, frequently self-critical perspectives on several important issues: the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various methods of data collection, the veracity and role of oral histories, the suitability of certain genres of scholarly writing for the study of Native Americans, the marketing of Native culture and history, and debates about cultural essentialism. Some contributors propose alternative forms of scholarship. Special attention is also given to the experiences, responsibilities, and challenges facing Native academics themselves....With lively prose and telling arguments, Natives and Academics lends clarity to the heated debate about the purpose and direction of Native American scholarship.

The Nature Way / Corbin Harney, as told to and edited by Alex Purbrick ; foreword by Tom Goldtooth.  Reno : University of Nevada Press, c2009.  118pp.  Main Library E99.S4 H269 2009 : "Corbin Harney was born into a Shoshone family on the Nevada-Idaho border. His grandparents raised him in the traditional ways of their people, teaching him the ancient spiritual beliefs that sustained their culture. The Nature Way is a rich compendium of Corbin Harney's experience and wisdom. His account of his life incorporates the tragic history of Native Americans in the Great Basin after the arrival of Euro-Americans, his realization of his own identity as a Native American, and his long study of his people's traditions and spiritual practices." His summary of the Shoshone and Paiute use of indigenous plants for food and healing highlights their understanding that the Earth and her denizens and products must be respected and protected in order to preserve the connection that all creatures have with sacred Mother Earth. Finally, his account of his role as an antinuclear activist expands on his awareness of the human responsibility to protect the Earth, especially from the extreme danger posed by nuclear technology and nuclear weapons of mass destruction.

Negotiators of change : historical perspectives on Native American women / [edited by] Nancy Shoemaker. New York : Routledge, 1995.  236pp.  Main Library E98.W8 N44 1995 : Negotiators of Change covers the history of ten tribal groups including the Cherokee, Iroquois and Navajo -- as well as tribes with less known histories such as the Yakima, Ute, and Pima-Maricopa. The book contests the idea that European colonialization led to a loss of Native American women's power, and instead presents a more complex picture of the adaption to, and subversion of, the economic changes introduced by Europeans. The essays also discuss the changing meainings of motherhood, women's roles and differing gender ideologies within this context.

Never give up! : the life of Pearl Carter Scott / Paul F. Lambert.  [Ada, Okla.] : Chickasaw Press, c2007.  272pp.  Main Library E99.C55 L36 2007 : Born in 1915 and raised in Marlow, Oklahoma, Pearl Carter enjoyed a privileged childhood. Her white father was a gifted businessman who happened to be blind. Her mother was half Chickasaw and half Choctaw. When Pearl was twelve, she met Wiley Post, who was just beginning his aviation career, and he taught the adventurous young girl how to fly. At age thirteen, her father bought her an airplane and converted a pasture into an airstrip. She married at age sixteen, and by the age of eighteen, with one child and another on the way, she retired from flying--even though it had made her a celebrity....Pearl and her husband raised three children, but the Great Depression and other circumstances dissolved the family's fortune. Then a fire destroyed most of her and her husband's belongings, and a few years later, she found herself divorced and poor. Yet Pearl maintained her positive outlook even during these difficult times. She turned to a life of service to the Chickasaw people and became a revered tribal elder who was inducted into the Oklahoma Aviation and Space Hall of Fame and the Chickasaw Nation Hall of Fame.

A New Deal for Native art : Indian Arts and Federal Policy, 1933-1943 / Jennifer McLerran.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2009.  299pp.  Main Library E98.A73 M37 2009 : As the Great Depression touched every corner of America, the New Deal promoted indigenous arts and crafts as a means of bootstrapping Native American peoples. But New Deal administrators' romanticization of indigenous artists predisposed them to favor pre-industrial forms rather than art that responded to contemporary markets....In this book Jennifer McLerran reveals how positioning the native artist as a pre-modern Other served the goals of New Deal programs—and how this sometimes worked at cross-purposes with promoting native self-sufficiency. She describes federal policies of the 1930s and early 1940s that sought to generate an upscale market for Native American arts and crafts. And by unraveling the complex ways in which commodification was negotiated and the roles that producers, consumers, and New Deal administrators played in that process, she sheds new light on native art’s commodity status and the artist’s position as colonial subject....In this first book to address the ways in which New Deal Indian policy specifically advanced commodification and colonization, McLerran reviews its multi-pronged effort to improve the market for Indian art through the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, arts and crafts cooperatives, murals, museum exhibits, and Civilian Conservation Corps projects. Presenting nationwide case studies that demonstrate transcultural dynamics of production and reception, she argues for viewing Indian art as a commodity, as part of the national economy, and as part of national political trends and reform efforts....
McLerran marks the contributions of key individuals, from John Collier and Rene d’Harnoncourt to Navajo artist Gerald Nailor, whose mural in the Navajo Nation Council House conveyed distinctly different messages to outsiders and tribal members. Featuring dozens of illustrations, A New Deal for Native Art offers a new look at the complexities of folk art "revivals" as it opens a new window on the Indian New Deal.

New Indians, old wars / Elizabeth Cook-Lynn.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2007. 226pp. Main Library E76.8 .C66 2007 : Addressing Native American studies past, present, and future, the essays in New Indians, Old Wars tackle the discipline head-on, presenting a radical revision of the popular view of the American West in the process. Instead of luxuriating in the West's past glories or accepting the widespread historians' view of it as a shared place, Elizabeth Cook-Lynn argues that the American West should be fundamentally understood as stolen....Cook-Lynn says that the Indian Wars of Resistance to the nineteenth- and twentieth-century colonial effort to seize native lands and resources must be given standing in the face of the ever-growing imperial narrative of America--because the terror the world is now witnessing may be the direct consequence of events which began in America's earliest dealings with the natives of this continent. Cook-Lynn's story examines the ongoing and perennial relationship of conflict between colonizers and indigenous people, and it is a story that every American must read....Cook-Lynn understands that the story of the American West teaches the political language of land theft and tyranny. She argues that to remedy this situation, Native American studies must be considered and pursued as its own discipline, rather than as a subset of history or anthropology. She makes an impassioned claim that such a shift, not merely an institutional or theoretical change, could allow Native American studies to play an important role in defending the sovereignty of indigenous nations today.

A new world : England's first view of America / Kim Sloan ; with contributions by Joyce E. Chaplin, Christian F. Feest and Ute Kuhlemann.  Chapel Hill, N.C. : The University of North Carolina Press, 2007.256pp.  Find Arts Library , Art Collection  NC242.W53 S56 2007 : This book reproduces in full the celebrated but rarely seen British Museum collections of watercolours made by this relatively unknown gentleman-artist. It also tells the story of his five voyages to 'Virginia' and his role as Governor of the 'Lost Colony' of Roanoke, which preceded Captain John Smith's more successful settlement at Jamestown twenty years later....White's watercolours bring to life the complex and sophisticated culture of the coastal Carolina Algonquians. All his known work is reproduced here - maps and charts, watercolours of Florida Indians, West Indian flora and fauna, the Inuit encountered by Martin Frobisher, and an amazing and influential set of watercolours of Picts and ancient Britons. Each one is reproduced in colour opposite its historical explanation, supplemented by the famous de Bry engravings, which were responsible for spreading his images throughout Europe, as well as other comparable works by contemporary and later artists including Mark Catesby, the eighteenth-century natural historian.

The Nez Perces in the Indian territory : Nimiipuu survival / J. Diane Pearson ; foreword by Patricia Penn Hilden.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.  383pp.  Main Library E83.877 .P43 2008 : In 1877, the Nez Perce tribe was exiled from their homeland in the Pacific Northwest to Indian Territory for eight years. Pearson (U. of California, Berkeley) explores this previously undocumented era in Native American studies by using newly discovered sources and oral histories that offer firsthand accounts of this odyssey, which was finally resolved in a positive manner in 1885. The author shows how the aftermath of the Nez Perce War actually provided the beginning of a foundation in civil rights 80 years before this concept was officially recognized by the United States. This account should interest history buffs and students of Native American Studies.

Nicholas Black Elk : medicine man, missionary, mystic / by Michael F. Steltenkamp.  Norman, Okla. : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  270pp.  Main Library E99.O3 B539 2009 : Steltenkamp has written what is said to be the first complete interpretive biography of Nicholas Black Elk (1863-1950), an Oglala Sioux religious elder who, as the title suggests, was a medicine man, mystic, and missionary. While the book explores Black Elk's entire life, it follows his last 50 years closely--a period frequently overlooked by those who think of him and have portrayed him as a strictly 19th century icon. In reality, Black Elk's fascinating life was a set of contrasts. He participated in the Battle of the Little Bighorn, yet also saw the early years of the atomic age.

North American Indians in the Great War / Susan Applegate Krouse ; photographs and original documentation by Joseph K. Dixon.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.  248pp.  Main Library and Faculty Collection (1 West) D810.I5 K76 2007 : More than twelve thousand American Indians served in the United States military in World War I, even though many were not U.S. citizens and did not enjoy the benefits of enfranchisement. Using the words of the veterans themselves, as collected by Joseph K. Dixon (1856–1926), North American Indians in the Great War presents the experiences of American Indian veterans during World War I and after their return home....Dixon, a photographer, author, and Indian rights advocate, had hoped that documenting American Indian service in the military would aid the Indian struggle to obtain general U.S. citizenship. Dixon managed to document nearly a quarter of the Indians who had served but was unable to complete his work, and his records languished unexamined until now. Unlike other sources of information on Indian military service collected by government officials, Dixon’s records come primarily from the veterans themselves. Their comments reveal pride in upholding an Indian tradition of military service as well as frustration with the U.S. government. Particularly in its immediacy and individuality, Dixon’s documentation of American Indian veterans of World War I adds greatly to our understanding of the experiences of American Indians in the U.S. military.

Oh what a slaughter : massacres in the American West, 1846-1890 / Larry McMurtry.  New York : Simon & Schuster, c2005.  178pp.  E78.W5 M35 2005 : In Oh What a Slaughter, Larry McMurtry has written a unique, brilliant, and searing history of the bloody massacres that marked -- and marred -- the settling of the American West in the nineteenth century, and which still provoke immense controversy today....Here are the true stories of the West's most terrible massacres -- Sacramento River, Mountain Meadows, Sand Creek, Marias River, Camp Grant, and Wounded Knee, among others. These massacres involved Americans killing Indians, but also Indians killing Americans, and, in the case of the hugely controversial Mountain Meadows Massacre in 1857, Mormons slaughtering a party of American settlers, including women and children....McMurtry's evocative descriptions of these events recall their full horror, and the deep, constant apprehension and dread endured by both pioneers and Indians. By modern standards the death tolls were often small -- Custer's famous defeat at Little Big Horn in 1876 was the only encounter to involve more than two hundred dead -- yet in the thinly populated West of that time, the violent extinction of a hundred people had a colossal impact on all sides. Though the perpetrators often went unpunished, many guilty and traumatized men felt compelled to tell and retell the horrors they had committed. From letters and diaries, McMurtry has created a moving and swiftly paced narrative, as memorable in its way as such classics as Evan S. Connell's Son of the Morning Star and Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

One vast winter count : the Native American West before Lewis and Clark / Colin G. Calloway.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2003.  631pp.  Main Library E78.W5 C43 2003 : This magnificent, sweeping work traces the histories of the Native peoples of the American West from their arrival thousands of years ago to the early years of the nineteenth century. Emphasizing conflict and change, One Vast Winter Count offers a new look at the early history of the region by blending ethnohistory, colonial history, and frontier history. Drawing on a wide range of oral and archival sources from across the West, Colin G. Calloway offers an unparalleled glimpse at the lives of generations of Native peoples in a western land soon to be overrun.

Our Knowledge is Not Primitive : Decolonizing Botanical Anishinaabe Teachings / Wendy Makoons Geniusz ; illustrations by Annmarie Geniusz.  Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2009.  214pp.  Main Library E99.C6 G647 2009 : Traditional Anishinaabe (Ojibwe or Chippewa) knowledge, like the knowledge systems of indigenous peoples around the world, has long been collected and presented by researchers who were not a part of the culture they observed. The result is a "colonized" version of the knowledge, one that is distorted and trivialized by an ill-suited Eurocentric paradigm of scientific investigation and classification. In Our Knowledge Is Not Primitive, Wendy Makoons Geniusz contrasts the way in which Anishinaabe botanical knowledge is presented in the academic record with how it is preserved in Anishinaabe culture. In doing so she seeks to open a dialogue between the two communities to discuss methods for decolonizing existing texts and to develop innovative approaches for conducting more culturally meaningful research in the future.....As an Anishinaabe who grew up in a household practicing traditional medicine and who went on to earn a doctorate and become a professional scholar, Geniusz possesses the authority of someone with a foot firmly planted in each world. Her unique ability to navigate both indigenous and scientific perspectives makes this book an invaluable contribution to the field and enriches our understanding of all native communities.

Our savage neighbors : how Indian war transformed early America / Peter Silver.  New York : W.W. Norton, c2008.  406pp.  Main Library E77 .S573 2008 : The mid-Atlantic colonies of 18th-century America were home to a remarkable diversity of immigrants—Germans, Quakers, Moravians, Englishmen and French, among others. In this exhaustively researched and elegantly written study, Princeton historian Silver asks how all the Europeans lived side by side. The answer, Silver says, is that they were solidified into a single people during the Seven Years' War in the 1750s by the fear of Indian attack. The motley Europeans morphed into white people, defined in opposition to Indians. (An intriguing appendix reveals that colonial newspapers tended to use the adjective white to describe people principally during bouts of Indian war.) But not everyone with pale skin became part of this new people—the most fascinating sections of the book explore why some European settlers, such as Quakers (who were accused of betraying white people's interests), were excluded from the collective. Silver also shows how fears of Indian menace were taken up during the Revolution: patriots shored up a distinctive American identity and claimed that the British were engaging in Indian-like atrocities, such as scalping and cannibalism. Silver's study will change the way scholars think about whiteness and will reshape our understanding of how 13 distinct colonies were knit together into one nation.

Note : Always check status to make sure book is available for use.  If status indicates In Process, ask for book at Circulation Desk.

Featured Books, P-R

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status.  If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

Painting the native world : life, land, and animals / Valerie K. Verzuh, Antonio R. Chavarria.  Petaluma, CA : Pomegranate Communications, 2009. 79pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection ND249.5.A54 V47 2009 : A major force in the Native American Fine Art movement, The Studio at the Santa Fe Indian School was established in 1932, by Dorothy Dunn. She opposed the view that indigenous traditions should be suppressed in favor of assimilation, encouraging instead a synthesis of these traditions with art practices and media of the mainstream culture. Some 50 works from the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, Santa Fe, New Mexico are presented here in full-page color plates, with essays by curators Verzuh and Chavarria. 

Peace came in the form of a woman : Indians and Spaniards in the Texas borderlands / Juliana Barr.  Chapel Hill : Published in association with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University, by the University of North Carolina Press, c2007.  397pp.  Main Library E78.T4 B37 2007 : Barr  revises the way historians view Spanish-era Texas, looking at gender roles, kinship, and cultural expectations among the Indian groups that controlled Texas and among the Spanish missionaries, soldiers, and settlers. When Spanish missionaries came to Texas in the 1690s, they brought with them a banner of the Virgin Mary. This banner convinced the Caddoes that the newcomers were friendly because women were so important to Caddoan hospitality--not because they worshipped Mary, as the Spanish believed. This was just the beginning of Spanish misunderstanding of the Indian cultures they sought to control. Women played an important role in diplomatic relations throughout Spanish Texas. Barr explains the gender roles and shows why women were always part of the diplomatic process, whether as hostesses, ambassadors, or captives, and why Spanish attempts to change traditional male roles caused violence. Her examination of Spanish interaction with Caddoes, Apaches, Comanches, and other Native groups is based on meticulous research, and her conclusions are compelling, leading to questions about other European interactions with Indians. Everyone who studies the Spanish borderlands, Native Americans, or women needs to read this book.

Peace, Power, Righteousness : An Indigenous Manifesto / Taiaiake Alfred.  Don Mills, Ont. : Oxford University Press, c2009.  2nd edition, 202pp.  Main Library E98.T77 A43 2009 : This book challenges the contemporary wisdom on Aboriginal governance. It argues that indigenous peoples must return to their political traditions and use these traditions to educate a new generation of leaders committed to values and the preservation of indigenous nationhood.

Peaceable kingdom lost : the Paxton Boys and the destruction of William Penn's holy experiment / Kevin Kenny.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  Main Library F152 .K29 2009 : William Penn established Pennsylvania in 1682 as a "holy experiment" in which Europeans and Indians could live together in harmony. In this book, historian Kevin Kenny explains how this Peaceable Kingdom--benevolent, Quaker, pacifist--gradually disintegrated in the eighteenth century, with disastrous consequences for Native Americans....Kenny recounts how rapacious frontier settlers, most of them of Ulster extraction, began to encroach on Indian land as squatters, while William Penn's sons cast off their father's Quaker heritage and turned instead to fraud, intimidation, and eventually violence during the French and Indian War. In 1763, a group of frontier settlers known as the Paxton Boys exterminated the last twenty Conestogas, descendants of Indians who had lived peacefully since the 1690s on land donated by William Penn near Lancaster. Invoking the principle of "right of conquest," the Paxton Boys claimed after the massacres that the Conestogas' land was rightfully theirs. They set out for Philadelphia, threatening to sack the city unless their grievances were met. A delegation led by Benjamin Franklin met them and what followed was a war of words, with Quakers doing battle against Anglican and Presbyterian champions of the Paxton Boys. The killers were never prosecuted and the Pennsylvania frontier descended into anarchy in the late 1760s, with Indians the principal victims. The new order heralded by the Conestoga massacres was consummated during the American Revolution with the destruction of the Iroquois confederacy. At the end of the Revolutionary War, the United States confiscated the lands of Britain's Indian allies, basing its claim on the principle of "right of conquest."...Based on extensive research in eighteenth-century primary sources, this engaging history offers an eye-opening look at how colonists--at first, the backwoods Paxton Boys but later the U.S. government--expropriated Native American lands, ending forever the dream of colonists and Indians living together in peace.

Peoples of the river valleys : the odyssey of the Delaware Indians / Amy C. Schutt. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2007.  250pp.  Main Library E99.D2 S34 2007 : Seventeenth-century Indians from the Delaware and lower Hudson valleys organized their lives around small-scale groupings of kin and communities. Living through epidemics, warfare, economic change, and physical dispossession, survivors from these peoples came together in new locations, especially the eighteenth-century Susquehanna and Ohio River valleys. In the process, they did not abandon kin and community orientations, but they increasingly defined a role for themselves as Delaware Indians in early American society....Peoples of the River Valleys offers a fresh interpretation of the history of the Delaware, or Lenape, Indians in the context of events in the mid-Atlantic region and the Ohio Valley. It focuses on a broad and significant period: 1609-1783, including the years of Dutch, Swedish, and English colonization and the American Revolution. An epilogue takes the Delawares' story into the mid-nineteenth century....Amy C. Schutt examines important themes in Native American history--mediation and alliance formation--and shows their crucial role in the development of the Delawares as a people. She goes beyond familiar questions about Indian-European relations and examines how Indian-Indian associations were a major factor in the history of the Delawares. Drawing extensively upon primary sources, including treaty minutes, deeds, and Moravian mission records, Schutt reveals that Delawares approached alliances as a tool for survival at a time when Euro-Americans were encroaching on Native lands. As relations with colonists were frequently troubled, Delawares often turned instead to form alliances with other Delawares and non-Delaware Indians with whom they shared territories and resources. In vivid detail, Peoples of the River Valleys shows the link between the Delawares' approaches to land and the relationships they constructed on the land.

Pocahontas and the Powhatan dilemma : an American portrait / Camilla Townsend.  New York : Hill and Wang, c2004. 223pp.  Main Library E99.P85 P5797 2004 : Camilla Townsend's stunning new book differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth century Native Americans were--in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world---not only to the invading British but to ourselves....Neither naïve nor innocent, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, diplomacy, and violence. Indeed, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought against the military power of the colonizing English. Resistance, espionage, collaboration, deception: Pocahontas's life is here shown as a road map to Native American strategies of defiance exercised in the face of overwhelming odds and in the hope for a semblance of independence worth the name....Townsend's Pocahontas emerges--as a young child on the banks of the Chesapeake, an influential noblewoman visiting a struggling Jamestown, an English gentlewoman in London--for the first time in three-dimensions; allowing us to see and sympathize with her people as never before.

Policing Race and Place in Indian Country : Over- and Underenforcement / Barbara Perry.  Lanham, MD : Lexington Books, c2009.  117pp.  Main Library E98.C87 P44 2009 : This book seeks to address a significant void in the scholarship on policing Native American communities. It is the first book to explore Native Americans' perspectives on the ways in which Native American communities - especially those in and around reservations - are both over - and underpoliced in ways that perpetuate both the criminalization and the victimization of Native Americans as nations and as individuals. Drawing upon a series of interviews conducted with 278 Native Americans from seven states, Policing Race and Place in Indian Country uncovers patterns of hate crimes against Native Americans as well as a general dissatisfaction with the nature of law enforcement in their communities. Participants reported activities ranging from willful blindness to Native American victimization at one extreme to overt forms of police harassment and violence at the other. What emerges from these descriptions is the recognition that the patterns observed by the participants of the study are an extension of a lengthy history of systemic racism against Native Americans." Policing Race and Place in Indian Country is one of the first books to address the policing of Native American communities. While there are several studies that investigate the racialized nature and context of policing, most only refer to Native Americans in passing. By focusing solely on the Native American community, this book will appeal to scholars writing on race and policing or criminal justice.

Pre-removal Choctaw history : exploring new paths / edited by Greg O'Brien.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.  265pp.  Main Library E99.C8 .P77 2008 : O'Brien draws on Choctaw oral traditions, language, artifacts and rituals; British, Spanish, and US government records; missionary accounts; archaeological studies; and other sources to recount the history of the Native American nation before they were forced from their home in Mississippi to territory west of the Mississippi River during the 1830s.

Private women, public lives : gender and the missions of the Californias / Bárbara O. Reyes.  Austin : University of Texas Press, 2009.  231pp.  Main Library HQ1464.B35 R49 2009  : Through the lives and works of three women in colonial California, Bárbara O. Reyes examines frontier mission social spaces and their relationship to the creation of gendered colonial relations in the Californias. She explores the function of missions and missionaries in establishing hierarchies of power and in defining gendered spaces and roles, and looks at the ways that women challenged, and attempted to modify, the construction of those hierarchies, roles, and spaces....Reyes studies the criminal inquiry and depositions of Barbara Gandiaga, an Indian woman charged with conspiracy to murder two priests at her mission; the divorce petition of Eulalia Callis, the first lady of colonial California who petitioned for divorce from her adulterous governor-husband; and the testimonio of Eulalia Pérez, the head housekeeper at Mission San Gabriel who acquired a position of significant authority and responsibility but whose work has not been properly recognized. These three women's voices seem to reach across time and place, calling for additional, more complex analysis and questions: Could women have agency in the colonial Californias? Did the social structures or colonial processes in place in the frontier setting of New Spain confine or limit them in particular gendered ways? And, were gender dynamics in colonial California explicitly rigid as a result of the imperatives of the goals of colonization?

Puebloan ruins of the Southwest / Arthur H. Rohn and William M. Ferguson.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2006.  320pp.  Main Library E99.P9 R634 2006 : Puebloan Ruins of the Southwest offers a complete picture of Puebloan culture from its prehistoric beginnings through twenty-five hundred years of growth and change, ending with the modern-day Pueblo Indians of New Mexico and Arizona. Aerial and ground photographs, more than 325 in color, and sixty settlement plans provide an armchair trip to ruins that are open to the public and that may be visited or viewed from nearby. Included, too, are the living pueblos from Taos in north central New Mexico along the Rio Grande Valley to Isleta, and westward through Acoma and Zuni to the Hopi pueblos in Arizona....In addition to the architecture of the ruins, Puebloan Ruins of the Southwest gives a detailed overview of the Pueblo Indians' lifestyles including their spiritual practices, food, clothing, shelter, physical appearance, tools, government, water management, trade, ceramics, and migrations.

Pueblos, Spaniards, and the kingdom of New Mexico / John L. Kessell.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2008.  225pp.  Main Library F799 .K378 2008 : Seventeenth-century New Mexico was like no other place. Conflicts and confluence arose between two groups: the longsettled Pueblos and the newly arrived Spaniards intent on making the land their own. Whether they called it conquest or pacification, the Spanish program of domination did not go as planned. In 1599, the Pueblo population was estimated at 60,000; in 2000, it was nearly the same....To understand the world of colonial New Mexico, we must set aside cherished stereotypes of Spanish cruelty and Native American Edens, even our self-congratulatory condemnation of European colonial expansion and Christian evangelism. Circumstances largely beyond the control of either the Pueblos or the Spaniards, combined with notable resilience on both parts, dictated mutual survival. Pueblos and Spaniards still live and let live in the American Southwest today. Their intricate dance through time, especially passionate in the seventeenth century, bids us to look closer.

Race and the Cherokee Nation : sovereignty in the nineteenth century / Fay A. Yarbrough.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008.  184pp.  Main Library E99.C5 Y37 2008 : "We believe by blood only," said a Cherokee resident of Oklahoma, speaking to reporters in 2007 after voting in favor of the Cherokee Nation constitutional amendment limiting its membership. In an election that made headlines around the world, a majority of Cherokee voters chose to eject from their tribe the descendants of the African American freedmen Cherokee Indians had once enslaved. Because of the unique sovereign status of Indian nations in the United States, legal membership in an Indian nation can have real economic benefits. In addition to money, the issues brought forth in this election have racial and cultural roots going back before the Civil War....Race and the Cherokee Nation examines how leaders of the Cherokee Nation fostered a racial ideology through the regulation of interracial marriage. By defining and policing interracial sex, nineteenth-century Cherokee lawmakers preserved political sovereignty, delineated Cherokee identity, and established a social hierarchy. Moreover, Cherokee conceptions of race and what constituted interracial sex differed from those of blacks and whites. Moving beyond the usual black/white dichotomy, historian Fay A. Yarbrough places American Indian voices firmly at the center of the story, as well as contrasting African American conceptions and perspectives on interracial sex with those of Cherokee Indians....For American Indians, nineteenth-century relationships produced offspring that pushed racial and citizenship boundaries. Those boundaries continue to have an impact on the way individuals identify themselves and what legal rights they can claim today.

Racism in Indian Country / Dean Chavers.  New York : Peter Lang, c2009.  240pp.  Main Library E98.E85 C53 2009 : Chavers (director, Catching the Dream, a national scholarship and school improvement organization in Albuquerque, New Mexico) compiles what is essentially a catalog of incidents and aspects of racism against Native Americans in the United States. He covers a broad range of issues including the institutional racism of the Bureau of Indian Affairs; Indian mascots in sports; financial redlining of Indian communities; victims of racist murder; and racism in education, employment, medicine, law enforcement, housing, stores and restaurants, politics an voting, oil and gas royalties, the environment, and religion, among other areas.

The real all Americans : the team that changed a game, a people, a nation / Sally Jenkins.  New York : Doubleday, c2007.  343pp.  Main Library GV958.U33 J45 2007 : If you guessed that Yale or Harvard ruled the college gridiron in 1911 and 1912, you'd be wrong. The most popular team belonged to an institution called the Carlisle Indian Industrial School. Its story begins with Lt. Col. Richard Henry Pratt, a fierce abolitionist who believed that Native Americans deserved a place in American society. In 1879, Pratt made a dangerous journey to the Dakota Territory to recruit Carlisle's first students. Years later, three students approached Pratt with the notion of forming a football team. Pratt liked the idea, and in less than twenty years the Carlisle football team was defeating their Ivy League opponents and in the process changing the way the game was played.  Carlisle introduced fans and opponents to shoulder pads, the forward pass and the reverse option. Led by renowned coach Glenn "Pop" Warner and player Jim Thorpe, regarded as one of the greatest athletes America has ever produced, the Indians' struggles, especially with racial and political bigotry, prove surprisingly prescient.

Rebuilding Native nations : strategies for governance and development / edited by Miriam Jorgensen ; foreword by Oren Lyons ; afterword by Satsan (Herb George).  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2007.  363pp.  Main Library E98.T77 R43 2007 : This collection addresses the challenge faced by Native nations to strengthen their practical, hands-on capacities to rebuild their societies according to their own designs. The essays tell of how Native nations reclaim the right to determine their own futures and govern themselves, and then exercise that right in vibrant, creative, and effective ways. The book begins with a critique of the approach to development that was (or is) common among Native nations that have not seized opportunities for true self-determination and self-governance. A subsequent examination of terms like "development," "governance," and "culture" provides a lens through which to understand the rest of the book. Four chapters follow that concern important institutional structures on which Native nations are built or rebuilt, such as constitutions, tribal courts, and administration. The next section reconceives key functions--businesses owned by tribal governments or individual entrepreneurs, governmental services and programs, and intergovernmental relations--to comprise a self-determined strategy for nation rebuilding. Final chapters analyze various barriers and opportunities to making strategies work for Native nations. The text is replete with examples and ideas, and is invaluable for its relevance, innovation, and creativity for governance and development of Native nations.

Reconfigurations of Native North America : an Anthology of New Perspectives / edited by John R. Wunder and Kurt E. Kinbacher ; foreword by Markku Henriksson.  Lubbock, Tex. : Texas Tech University Press, c2009.  314pp.  Main Library E76.6 .R43 2009 : Seventeen essays highlight contemporary indigenous studies. Primarily for scholarly audiences, the essays reflect indigenous voices and consider Native worldviews while confronting issues such as indigenous identity, cultural perseverance, economic development, and urbanization. Discussions examine mainstream policies that influenced Native peoples in a number of eras and places.

Recovering the sacred : the power of naming and claiming / Winona LaDuke.  Cambridge, MA : South End Press, c2005.  294pp.  Main Library E98.R3 L33 2005 : A well-known Native activist scholar/two-time Green Party vice-presidential candidate examines how her people are reclaiming their spiritual heritage from cultural imperialism. Reviving the traditional diet and seeking out earth-friendly energy sources are key elements of the healing process. LaDuke lives on the White Earth Reservation in Minnesota. [ religion, philosophy, sacred space ]

Religion and healing in Native America : pathways for renewal / edited by Suzanne J. Crawford O'Brien ; foreword by Inés Talamantez.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2008.  222pp.  Main Library E98.M4 .R45 2008 : What it means to be healthy or to heal is not universal from culture to culture, from religion to religion. Indeed, in many cultures religion and healing are intimately tied to each other. In Native American communities healing is conceived as the place where ideas about the body and selfhood are brought to light and expressed within healing traditions. Healing is defined as self-making, and illness as whatever compromises one's ability to be oneself. This book explores religion and healing in Native America, emphasizing the lived experience of indigenous religious practices and their role in health and healing. Indigenous traditions of healing in North America emphasize that the healthy self is defined by its relationship with its human, spiritual, and ecological communities.

Restoring the balance : First Nations women, community, and culture / Gail Guthrie Valaskakis, Madeleine Dion Stout, and Eric Guimond, editors.  Winnipeg : University of Manitoba Press, c2009.  379pp.  Main Library E98.W8 R47 2009 : This edited work gathers together an excellent collection of essays on the efforts of Canadian First Nations women to celebrate, revive, and restore traditional cultural practices and ways of knowing. Divided into four themed sections covering historic trauma, intellectual and social movements, health and healing, and arts, culture, and language, the book contains 12 strong chapters on any variation of these larger themes. The editors note that "this body of work portrays First Nations women in a novel and positive way while suggesting options for sustained improvement of their individual, family, and community wellbeing." (p. 2) The collection's great strength is its incredible tightness--authors often explore the same issues, histories, individuals, and legislations from a variety of angles, weaving together many different strands into a clear, compelling whole. The collection achieves the remarkable for an academic text--focusing on analysis and action, exploring problems and presenting solutions. All of the chapters are well written and engaging, and a handful--on trauma and resilience, Aboriginal women's writings, cultural competence, and museum artifacts--are especially excellent.

Rethinking the Fur Trade : Cultures of Exchange in an Atlantic World / edited by Susan Sleeper-Smith.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2009.  638pp.  MSU Faculty Collection HD9944.N62 R48 2009 : Lucrative, far-reaching, and complex, the fur trade bound together Europeans and Native peoples of North America in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Rethinking the Fur Trade offers a nuanced look at the broad range of contracts that characterized the fur trade, a phenomenon that has often been oversimplified and misrepresented. These essays show how the role of Native Americans was far more instrumental in the conduct and outcome of the fur trade than previously suggested....Rethinking the Fur Trade exposes what has been called the “invisible hand of indigenous commerce,” revealing how it changed European interaction with Indians, influenced what was produced to serve the interests of Indian customers, and led to important cultural innovations. The initial essays explain the working mechanisms of the fur trade and explore how and why it evolved in a North Atlantic context. The second section examines indigenous perspectives through primary-source writings from the period and considers newly evolving indigenous perspectives about the fur trade. The final sections analyze the social history of the fur trade, the profound effect of the cloth trade on Indian dress and culture, and the significance of gender, kinship, and community in the workings of economic exchange.

Revolutionary negotiations : Indians, empires, and diplomats in the founding of America / Leonard J. Sadosky.  Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009.  275pp.  Main Library E249 .S23 2009 : Revolutionary Negotiation examines early American diplomatic negotiations with both the European powers and the various American Indian nations from the 1740s through the 1820s. Leonard J. Sadosky interweaves previously distinct settings for American diplomacy - courts and council fires - into a single transatlantic system of politics....Whether states were functioning as provinces in the British Empire or as independent states, American assertions of power were directed simultaneously to the west and to the east - to Native American communities and to European empires across the Atlantic. American leaders aspired to equality with Europeans, who often dismissed them, while they were forced to concede agency to Native Americans, whom they often wished they could ignore. As Americans used diplomatic negotiation to assert their new nations equality with the great powers of Europe and gradually defined American Indian nations as possessing a different (and lesser) kind of sovereignty, they were also forced to confront the relations between the states in their own federal union.
Acts of diplomacy thus defined the founding of America - not only by drawing borders and facilitating commerce, but also by defining and constraining sovereign power in a way that privileged some and weakened others. These negotiations truly were revolutionary.

The rise and fall of Indian country, 1825-1855 / William E. Unrau.  Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, c2007.  201pp.  Main Library E93 .U9985 2007 : Central to the federal government's aggressive Indian removal efforts in the early decades of the 19th century was defining a permanent Indian frontier, where displaced Native peoples could reside free of white interference and pressure. Section I of the Indian Intercourse Act of 1834 defined just such a place, but as Unrau points out, ambiguous boundaries, weak administration, chronic violations of the law, and continued land sales in the newly specified area led to deterioration of living conditions of tribes residing there. Federal officials hoped that besides physical space for displaced Indians, the Indian Country would also become a place to control their behavior and modify their cultures. Such hopes, Unrau argues, were illusory, and the establishment of Indian country in 1834 "was ineffectual and a failure from the beginning." Challenging traditional assessments that the Indian Intercourse Act demonstrated the government's benevolent--albeit misguided--attempt at "saving the Indian," Unrau maintains that, at best, the 1834 act was "a stopgap measure for delaying non-Indian occupation of the trans-Missouri West for a decade or two. At worst, it was divisive or completely deceptive legislation from the start."

The River Indians : Mohicans making history / Shirley W. Dunn.  Fleischmanns, N.Y. : Purple Mountain Press, c2009.  132pp.  Main Library E99.M12 D87 2009 : Shirley Dunn's new book presents a stirring look at historic events in which the Mohicans (called River Indians) participated: Leaders among the native nations on the Hudson, Mohicans welcomed Henry Hudson, who visited them for 13 days. They initiated the upriver fur trade and continued it for a century. Mohicans were close friends with the Dutch leader, Arent Van Curler, and helped save the farms of Rensselaerswyck. They fought beside English soldiers in wars against Canada from 1690 to 1765, protected Albany from attack from Canada, and enlisted in the Revolution on the American side. Dunn emphasizes the importance of the Mohicans to the history of New York colony and state. Today, many of us live on land from Dutchess County to Lake Champlain that once was theirs.

Featured Books, S

Savages and Scoundrels : the Untold Story of America's Road to Empire Through Indian Territory / Paul VanDevelder.  New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, c2009.  322pp.  Main Library E93 .V36 2009  : What really happened in the early days of our nation? How was it possible for white settlers to march across the entire continent, inexorably claiming Native American lands for themselves? Who made it happen, and why? This gripping book tells America’s story from a new perspective, chronicling the adventures of our forefathers and showing how a legacy of repeated betrayals became the bedrock on which the republic was built.....Paul VanDevelder takes as his focal point the epic federal treaty ratified in 1851 at Horse Creek, formally recognizing perpetual ownership by a dozen Native American tribes of 1.1 million square miles of the American West. The astonishing and shameful story of this broken treaty—one of 371 Indian treaties signed during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries—reveals a pattern of fraudulent government behavior that again and again displaced Native Americans from their lands. VanDevelder describes the path that led to the genocide of the American Indian; those who participated in it, from cowboys and common folk to aristocrats and presidents; and how the history of the immoral treatment of Indians through the twentieth century has profound social, economic, and political implications for America even today.

The scratch of a pen : 1763 and the transformation of North America / Colin G. Calloway.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2006.  219pp.  Main Library E46 .C35 2006 : In this superb volume in Oxford's acclaimed Pivotal Moments series, Colin Calloway reveals how the Treaty of Paris of 1763 had a profound effect on American history, setting in motion a cascade of unexpected consequences, as Indians and Europeans, settlers and frontiersmen, all struggled to adapt to new boundaries, new alignments, and new relationships....Britain now possessed a vast American empire stretching from Canada to the Florida Keys, yet the crushing costs of maintaining it would push its colonies toward rebellion. White settlers, free to pour into the West, clashed as never before with Indian tribes struggling to defend their way of life. In the Northwest, Pontiac's War brought racial conflict to its bitterest level so far. Whole ethnic groups migrated, sometimes across the continent: it was 1763 that saw many exiled settlers from Acadia in French Canada move again to Louisiana, where they would become Cajuns. Calloway unfurls this panoramic canvas with vibrant narrative skill, peopling his tale with memorable characters such as William Johnson, the Irish baronet who moved between Indian campfires and British barracks; Pontiac, the charismatic Ottawa chieftain; and James Murray, Britains first governor in Quebec, who fought to protect the religious rights of his French Catholic subjects....Most Americans know the significance of the Declaration of Independence or the Emancipation Proclamation, but not the Treaty of Paris. Yet 1763 was a year that shaped our history just as decisively as 1776 or 1862. This captivating book shows why.

Self-determination : the other path for Native Americans / edited by Terry L. Anderson, Bruce L. Benson, and Thomas E. Flanagan.  Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 2006. 332pp.  Main Library E98.E2 S45 2006 : This book compares and contrasts historical and contemporary Canadian and U.S. Native American policy. The contributors include economists, political scientists, and lawyers, who, despite analyzing a number of different groups in several eras, consistently take a political economy approach to the issues. Using this framework, the authors examine the evolution of property rights, from wildlife in pre-Columbian times and the potential for using property rights to resolve contemporary fish and wildlife issues, to the importance of customs and culture to resource use decisions; the competition from states for Native American casino revenues; and the impact of sovereignty on economic development. In each case, the chapters present new data and new ways of thinking about old evidence. In addition to providing a framework for analysis and new data, this book suggests how Native American and First Nation policy might be reformed toward the end of sustainable economic development, cultural integrity, and self-determination. For these reasons, the book should be of interest to scholars, policy analysts, and students of Native American law, economics, and resource use, as well as those interested in the history of Native Americans and Canada’s First Nations.

Selling your father's bones : America's 140-year war against the Nez Perce Tribe / Brian Schofield.  New York : Simon & Schuster, 2009.  356pp.  Main Library E99.N5 S347 2009 : Part historical narrative, part travelogue, and part environmental plea, this book recounts an astonishing journey. Joseph, chief of the peaceable Nez Perce band in Oregon's Wallowa Valley, had long sworn to uphold the dying words of his father: "This country holds your father's body. Never sell the bones of your mother and your father." Yet, in 1877, as the U.S. government confined the tribe to ever smaller reservations, the fateful decision of several young Nez Perce warriors to attack the settlers set an exodus in motion. For eleven weeks, seven hundred men, women, and children traveled 1,700 miles, pursued by the U.S. Army. Just forty miles from the Canadian border, the tribe survived a calamitous five-day siege until Joseph could no longer bear his people's suffering and surrendered. This book intercuts the Nez Perce's fight for survival with the author's own travels across the same yet altered terrain, the mountains, forests, badlands, and prairies of modern-day Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana.

The Seminole freedmen : a history / Kevin Mulroy.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  446pp.  Main Library E99.S28 M85 2007 : Popularly known as "Black Seminoles," descendants of the Seminole freedmen of Indian Territory are a unique American cultural group. Now Kevin Mulroy examines the long history of these people to show that this label denies them their rightful identity. To correct misconceptions of the historical relationship between Africans and Seminole Indians, he traces the emergence of the group's society from its eighteenth-century Florida origins to the present day.  Freedmen and Seminoles enjoy a partially shared past. This book shows that the freedmen's history and culture are unique and entirely their own. As the first full-length examination of the maroon community in Indian Territory and Oklahoma, this book makes a vital contribution to studies of racial identity, mixed-race societies, and African Americans in the West.

Serving Their Country : American Indian Politics and Patriotism in the Twentieth Century / Paul C. Rosier.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  360pp.  Main Library E98.T77 R67 2009  : Over the twentieth century, American Indians fought for their right to be both American and Indian. In an illuminating book, Paul C. Rosier traces how Indians defined democracy, citizenship, and patriotism in both domestic and international contexts....Battles over the place of Indians in the fabric of American life took place on reservations, in wartime service, in cold war rhetoric, and in the courtroom. The Society of American Indians, founded in 1911, asserted that America needed Indian cultural and spiritual values. In World War II, Indians fought for their ancestral homelands and for the United States. The domestic struggle of Indian nations to defend their cultures intersected with the international cold war stand against termination—the attempt by the federal government to end the reservation system. Native Americans seized on the ideals of freedom and self-determination to convince the government to preserve reservations as places of cultural strength. Red Power activists in the 1960s and 1970s drew on Third World independence movements to assert an ethnic nationalism that erupted in a series of protests—in Iroquois country, in the Pacific Northwest, during the occupation of Alcatraz Island, and at Wounded Knee....Believing in an empire of liberty for all, Native Americans pressed the United States to honor its obligations at home and abroad. Like African Americans, twentieth-century Native Americans served as a visible symbol of an America searching for rights and justice. American history is incomplete without their story.

Shadows at dawn : an Apache massacre and the violence of history / by Karl Jacoby ; foreword by Patricia Nelson Limerick.  New York : Penguin Books, 2009. 358pp.  Main Library E83.866 .J33 2009 : In April 1871, a group of Americans, Mexicans, and Tohono O'odham Indians surrounded an Apache village at dawn and murdered nearly 150 men, women, and children in their sleep. In the past century the attack, which came to be known as the Camp Grant Massacre, has largely faded from memory. Now, drawing on oral histories, contemporary newspaper reports, and the participants' own accounts, prize-winning author Karl Jacoby brings this perplexing incident and tumultuous era to life to paint a sweeping panorama of the American Southwest—a world far more complex, diverse, and morally ambiguous than the traditional portrayals of the Old West.

The Shawnees and the war for America / Colin G. Calloway.  New York : Viking, 2007.  216pp.  Main Library E83.775 C355 2007 : Long before the American Revolution, the Shawnees lived in Ohio, hunted in Kentucky, and traveled as far afield as Pennsylvania, Georgia, and Missouri. White settlers, however, sharply curtailed their freedom. With the courage and resilience embodied by their legendary leader Tecumseh, the Shawnee tribe waged a war of territorial and cultural resistance that lasted for more than sixty years. For a time the Shawnees and their allies met American forces on nearly equal terms—but their story is of an embattled nation fighting to maintain its cultural and political independence....Here is the account of the early American settlers' drive to occupy the West, the Shawnees' unwavering defense of their homeland, and the bitter battles that resulted. Here too are the alliances that the Shawnees forged with their Indian neighbors to present a united resistance, as well as instances of cooperation, collaboration, and intermarriage between the opposing forces.

The Shawnees and their neighbors, 1795-1870 / Stephen Warren.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2005.  217pp.  Main Library E99.S35 W37 2005 : While much has been written about Tecumseh's efforts during the early 1810s to expand his people's long-standing alliances with their Indian neighbors, Warren focuses on the internal dynamics and survival strategies of various Shawnee communities, and the efforts of lesser-known Shawnee leaders (such as Black Hoof) who responded to forced change through accommodation. Some Shawnee groups, convinced that warfare for the Ohio country was futile, decided as early as the 1780s to abandon their homelands and reestablish themselves west of the Mississippi River. Along with other migrant peoples, these Western (or Absentee) Shawnees labored to forge a sovereign confederacy of Indian tribes in the West. After Tecumseh's defeat at the Battle of Thames, however, the federal government and its missionary allies attempted to diminish multiethnic alliances between the Shawnees and their Indian neighbors while working to consolidate them under a unified tribal government led by economically successful and accommodationist-minded mixed-bloods. Cogently written and well researched, this book focuses on the variety of Indian responses and their consequences during the relocation era, making it an especially important contribution.

Shoshonean peoples and the overland trails : frontiers of the Utah Superintendency of Indian Affairs, 1849-1869 / Dale L. Morgan ; edited and introduced by Richard L. Saunders ; ethnohistorical essay by Gregory E. Smoak.  Logan : Utah State University Press, c2007.  424pp.  Main Library E99.S4 M65 2007 :  This compilation of  Dale Morgan’s  historical work on Indians in the Intermountain West focuses primarily on the Shoshone who lived near the Oregon and California trails. Three connected works by Morgan are included: First is his classic article on the history of the Utah Superintendency of Indian Affairs. This is followed by an important set of government reports and correspondence from the National Archives concerning the Eastern Shoshone and their leader Washakie. Morgan heavily annotated these for serial publication in the Annals of Wyoming.  He also wrote a previously unpublished history of early relations among the Western Shoshone, emigrants, and the government along the California Trail. Morgan biographer Richard L. Saunders introduced, edited, and further annotated this collection. His introduction includes an intellectual biography of Morgan that focuses on the place of the anthologized pieces in Morgan’s corpus. Gregory E. Smoak, a leading historian of the Shoshone, contributed an ethnohistorical essay as additional context for Morgan’s work.

Sitting Bull / Bill Yenne.  Yardley, Penn. : Westholme, 2008.  379pp.  Browsing Collection (1 East) E99.D1 Y46 2008 : As a celebrated warrior, shaman, and leader of the Lakota tribe, Sitting Bull was both a fascinating and frightening icon to the expanding United States, a 19th-century cross-cultural superstar who was at once a friend to Buffalo Bill and the emblem of Native American resistance in the face of the westward settlement. In Sitting Bull, Bill Yenne has produced a fascinating and exhaustively researched biography, drawing from contemporary sources as well as the iconic leader's own "Hieroglyphic Autobiography" (a series of pictographs depicting pivotal events in his life) to create an informal and relaxed account that still packs an amazing amount of detail. Recounting the exploits of the budding warrior known as Jumping Badger, his misunderstood role in the Battle of Little Big Horn, and his death on the eve of the massacre at Wounded Knee, Sitting Bull cuts through legend to place the Lakota leader square into his own cultural context, spurning the usual wasichu filters or biases.

A song for the horse nation : horses in Native American cultures / edited by George P. Horse Capture and Emil Her Many Horses ; with additional essays by Herman J. Viola and Linda R. Martin.  Washington, D.C. : National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution ; Golden, Colo. : Fulcrum Pub., c2006.  96pp. Main Library E98.H55 S66 2006 : To celebrate the central role of horses in Native American culture, this volume includes stories and songs collected a century ago along with poems by contemporary Native American writers and reproductions of artifacts housed in the National Museum of the American Indian. Photographs from the early 20th century to the present day complement the images of decorative saddle blankets, beaded ornaments and ceremonial masks.

A sorrow in our heart : the life of Tecumseh / by Allan W. Eckert.  New York : Bantam, c1992. 862pp.  Main Library E99.S35 T135 1992 : Though there are many biographies of the great Shawnee chief Tecumseh (1768-1813), this effort by historical novelist Eckert ( The Frontiersman ) may spark new interest--and controversy--with its "hidden dialogue" technique. After more than 25 years of research, the author felt free to recreate Tecumseh's conversations and thoughts in what proves to be an entertaining blend of fact and fiction. The orator and organizer's life was shaped by his tribe's tragic confrontation with westward-moving whites, who encroached on Native American lands along the Ohio River valley. His long struggle against this dispossession led Tecumseh to create a historic confederacy of tribes, but this crowning achievement was destroyed by his own brother at Tippecanoe in 1811. Eckert's dialogue is clunky, yet his colorful evocation of this seminal American figure will be more broadly accessible than are drier, more factual accounts.  (Publishers Weekly)

Sovereignty, separatism, and survivance : ideological encounters in the literature of Native North America / edited by Benjamin D. Carson.  Newcastle : Cambridge Scholars, 2009.  173pp.  Main Library PS173.I6 .S68 2009 : This collection, broad in its scope, explores rich and multi-faceted literary works by and about Native Americans from the 'long' early American period to the present. What links these essays is a concern for the ways in which Native Americans have navigated, negotiated, and resisted dominant white ideology since the founding of the Republic. Importantly, these essays are historically situated and consider not only the ways in which indigenous peoples are represented in American literature and history, but pay much needed attention to the actual lived experiences of Native Americans inside and outside of native communities. By addressing cross-cultural protest, resistance to dominant white ideology, the importance to Natives of land and land redress, sovereignty, separatism, and cultural healing, "Sovereignty, Separatism, and Survivance" contributes to our understanding of the discrepancy between ideological representations of native peoples and the real-life consequences those representations have for the ways in which indigenous peoples live out their daily lives.

Speak like singing : classics of Native American literature / Kenneth Lincoln.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2007.  367pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 L55 2007 : Speak Like Singing focuses on early books of poetry and prose by select Native writers showcasing the distinct voices and tribal diversities of living Indians. Rather than scanning the new-day horizon, as in Native American Renaissance three decades ago, this study focuses on carefully chosen paradigms in working daylight....This is not a book about bygone ethnoliteracies in other tongues and times. Speak Like Singing offers a cross-cultural study of Native voices today as they speak through American literature, specifically the fusions of poetry and prose in Western English.

Spirits of the Air : Birds & American Indians in the South / Shepard Krech III.  Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2009.  245pp.  Main Library E78.S65 K74 2009 : Before the massive environmental change wrought by the European colonization of the South, hundreds of species of birds filled the region's flyways in immeasurable numbers. Before disease, war, and displacement altered the South's earliest human landscape, Native Americans hunted and ate birds and made tools and weapons from their beaks, bones, and talons. More significant to Shepard Krech III, Indians adorned themselves with feathers, invoked avian powers in ceremonies and dances, and incorporated bird imagery on pottery, carvings, and jewelry....Krech, a renowned authority on Native American interactions with nature, reveals as never before the omnipresence of birds in Native American life. From the time of the earliest known renderings of winged creatures in stone and earthworks through the nineteenth century, when Native southerners took part in decimating bird species with highly valued, fashionable plumage, Spirits of the Air examines the complex and changeable influences of birds on the Native American worldview....We learn of birds for which places and people were named; birds common in iconography and oral traditions; birds important in ritual and healing; and birds feared for their links to witches and other malevolent forces. Still other birds had no meaning for Native Americans. Krech shows us these invisible animals too, enriching our understanding of both the Indian-bird dynamic and the incredible diversity of winged life once found in the South. A crowning work drawing on Krech's distinguished career in anthropology and natural history, Spirits of the Air recovers vanished worlds and shows us our own anew.

Stealing Indian women : native slavery in the Illinois Country / Carl J. Ekberg.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2007.  236pp.  Main Library E98.S6 E32 2007 : The first history of Indian slavery in the Mississippi Valley during the colonial era.  Based almost entirely on original source documents from the United States, France, and Spain, Carl J. Ekberg's Stealing Indian Women provides a novel overview of Indian slavery in the Mississippi Valley. His detailed study of a fascinating and convoluted criminal case involving various slave women and a métis (mixed-blood) woodsman named Céladon illuminates race and gender relations, Creole culture, and the lives of Indian slaves--particularly women--in ways never before possible.

"Strong Medicine speaks" : a Native American elder has her say : an oral history / Amy Hill Hearth.  New York : Atria Books, 2008. 267pp.  Main Library E99.D2 H437 2008 : In "Strong Medicine" Speaks, Hearth turns her talent for storytelling to a Native American matriarch presenting a powerful account of Indian life....Born and raised in a nearly secret part of New Jersey that remains Native ancestral land, Marion "Strong Medicine" Gould is an eighty-five-year-old Elder in her Lenni-Lenape tribe and community. Taking turns with the author as the two women alternate voices throughout this moving book, Strong Medicine tells of her ancestry, tracing it back to the first Native peoples to encounter the Europeans in 1524, through the strife and bloodshed of America's early years, up to the twentieth century and her own lifetime, decades colored by oppression and terror yet still lifted up by the strength of an enduring collective spirit....This genuine and delightful telling gives voice to a powerful female Elder whose dry wit and charming humor will provide wisdom and inspiration to readers from every background. Also see Amy Hill Hearth Discusses New Book Strong Medicine Speaks

Subjects unto the same king : Indians, English, and the contest for authority in colonial New England / Jenny Hale Pulsipher. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2005. 361pp.  Main Library E78.N5 P85 2005 : Land ownership was not the sole reason for conflict between Indians and English, Jenny Pulsipher writes in Subjects unto the Same King, a book that cogently redefines the relationship between Indians and colonists in seventeenth-century New England. Rather, the story is much more complicated--and much more interesting. It is a tale of two divided cultures, but also of a host of individuals, groups, colonies, and nations, all of whom used the struggle between and within Indian and English communities to promote their own authority....As power within New England shifted, Indians appealed outside the region--to other Indian nations, competing European colonies, and the English crown itself--for aid in resisting the overbearing authority of such rapidly expanding societies as the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Thus Indians were at the center--and not always on the losing end--of a contest for authority that spanned the Atlantic world. Beginning soon after the English settled in Plymouth, the power struggle would eventually spawn a devastating conflict--King Philip's War--and draw the intervention of the crown, resulting in a dramatic loss of authority for both Indians and colonists by century's end....Through exhaustive research, Jenny Hale Pulsipher has rewritten the accepted history of the Indian-English relationship in colonial New England, revealing it to be much more complex and nuanced than previously supposed.

Survivance : narratives of Native presence / edited by Gerald Vizenor.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008. 385pp.  Main Library E98.S67 S87 2008 : The concept and idea of survivance has revolutionized our understanding of the lives, creative impulses, literary practices, and histories of the Native peoples of North America. Engendered and articulated by the Anishinaabe critic and writer Gerald Vizenor, survivance throws into relief the dynamic, inventive, and enduring heart of Native cultures well beyond the colonialist trappings of absence, tragedy, and powerlessness. Vizenor argues that many people in the world are enamored with and obsessed by the concocted images of the Indian—the simulations of indigenous character and cultures as essential victims. Native survivance, on the other hand, is an active sense of presence over historical absence, deracination, and oblivion. The nature of survivance is unmistakable in Native stories, natural reason, active traditions, customs, and narrative resistance and is clearly observable in personal attributes such as humor, spirit, cast of mind, and moral courage in literature....In this anthology, eighteen scholars discuss the themes and practices of survivance in literature, examining the legacy of Vizenor’s original insights and exploring the manifestations of survivance in a variety of contexts. Contributors interpret and compare the original writings of William Apess, Eric Gansworth, Louis Owens, Carter Revard, Gerald Vizenor, and Velma Wallis, among others.

Featured Books, T-V

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries. Note : always check the online catalog for the latest information on location and status. If a book is "in process", you can ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

The Tainted Gift : the Disease Method of Frontier Expansion / Barbara Alice Mann.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2009.  180pp.  Main Library E98.D6 M36 2009 : For the first time, an accomplished scholar offers a painstakingly researched examination of the United States' involvement in deliberate disease spreading among native peoples in the military conquest of the West.

Talking back to civilization : Indian voices from the Progressive Era / edited with an introduction by Frederick E. Hoxie.  Boston : Bedford/St. Martins, c2001.  190pp.  Main Library E93 .T215 2001 : As progressive reformers took on America’s ills at the start of the twentieth century, a new generation of Native American reformers took on America, "talking back" to the civilization that had overrun but not crushed their own. This volume offers a collection of 21 primary sources, including journal articles, testimony, and political cartoons by Native Americans of the Progressive Era, who worked in a variety of fields to defend their communities and culture. Their voices are organized into 7 topical chapters on subjects such as native religion, education, and Indian service in World War I. Spanning the period from the 1893 Columbian Expedition to the 1920s' congressional land hearings, this rich array of voices fills an important gap in the chronology of Native American studies. An engaging introduction focusing on the intellectual leaders of the protest efforts includes background on the Progressive Era, while headnotes for each document, striking illustrations, a chronology of major events, and a bibliography support the firsthand accounts.

Teaching Native America Across the Curriculum : a Critical Inquiry / Curry Stephenson Malott, Lisa Waukau, Lauren Waukau-Villagomez.  New York : Peter Lang, c2009.  248pp.  Main Library E97 .M343 2009 : In teaming with two women educators who were raised on the Menominee Indian reservation, Malott (education, D'Youville College, Buffalo, New York) underscores that being white does not mean that one has to reproduce colonial legacies. Following autobiographical notes, they discuss why Indigenous insights are crucial to education for literacies across cultures and subjects in a pluralistic society from a critical constructivist perspective, and apply these insights in a case study of teaching at this Wisconsin reservation. A lesson plan by a Native American teacher that includes an analysis of Longfellow's The Song of Hiawatha for a 11th grade American literature class is appended.

Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History / Patrick Russell LeBeau.  Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009.  376pp.  Main Library and MSU Faculty Collection (1 West)  E76.6 .L334 2009 : Major help for American Indian History term papers has arrived to enrich and stimulate students in challenging and enjoyable ways. Students from high school age to undergraduate will be able to get a jump start on assignments with the hundreds of term paper projects and research information offered here in an easy-to-use format. Users can quickly choose from the 100 important events, spanning from the first Indian contact with European explorers in 1535 to the Native American Languages Act of 1990. Coverage includes Indian wars and treaties, acts and Supreme Court decisions, to founding of Indian newspapers and activist groups, and key cultural events. Each event entry begins with a brief summary to pique interest and then offers original and thought-provoking term paper ideas in both standard and alternative formats that often incorporate the latest in electronic media, such as iPod and iMovie. The best in primary and secondary sources for further research are then annotated, followed by vetted, stable Web site suggestions and multimedia resources, usually films, for further viewing and listening. Librarians and faculty will want to use this as well.  The table of contents itemizes the 100 different paper topics covered.

The texture of contact : European and Indian settler communities on the frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783 / David L. Preston.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  395pp.  Main Library E99.I7 P75 2009 : The Texture of Contact is a landmark study of Iroquois and European communities and coexistence in eastern North America before the American Revolution. David L. Preston details the ways in which European and Iroquois settlers on the frontiers creatively adapted to each other’s presence, weaving webs of mutually beneficial social, economic, and religious relationships that sustained the peace for most of the eighteenth century....Drawing on a wealth of previously unexamined archival research, Preston describes everyday encounters between Europeans and Indians along the frontiers of the Iroquois Confederacy in the St. Lawrence, Mohawk, Susquehanna, and Ohio valleys. Homesteads, taverns, gristmills, churches, and markets were frequent sites of intercultural exchange and negotiation. Complex diplomatic and trading relationships developed as a result of European and Iroquois settlers bartering material goods. Innovative land-sharing arrangements included the common practice of Euroamerican farmers living as tenants of the Mohawks, sometimes for decades. This study reveals that the everyday lives of Indians and Europeans were far more complex and harmonious than past histories have suggested. Preston’s nuanced comparisons between various settlements also reveal the reasons why peace endured in the Mohawk and St. Lawrence valleys while warfare erupted in the Susquehanna and Ohio valleys....One of the most comprehensive studies of eighteenth-century Iroquois history, The Texture of Contact broadens our understanding of eastern North America’s frontiers and the key role that the Iroquois played in shaping that world.

They know who they are / Mike & Martha Larsen.  Ada, Okla. : The Chickasaw Press, c2008. 129pp.  Oversize Collection (Basement Center) E99.C55 L37 2008 : In August 2004, Oklahoma Centennial project artist Mike Larsen approached Chickasaw Nation leaders with an idea to honor living Chickasaw elders―sages of his own tribe. He wanted to learn about their families and hear their stories, and he wanted to connect with their Chickasaw strength and spirit. Larsen's vision was to paint a series of portraits of these elders....Accompanied by his wife, Martha Larsen, the artist began a creative process that turned into a personal journey. During the interviews, the Larsens were often treated like members of the elder's family. They listened and learned what it means to be Chickasaw--what it means to "know who you are." In the Larsen studio, carefully rendered sketches progressed from paper to canvas to yield the 24 remarkable paintings reproduced in this volume. Martha Larsen has written a richly detailed narrative, based on each elder's interview, documenting his or her cultural beliefs, experiences and history.

The third space of sovereignty : the postcolonial politics of U.S.-indigenous relations / Kevin Bruyneel.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2007.  313pp.  Main Library E98.T77 B78 2007 : The imposition of modern American colonial rule has defined U.S.–indigenous relations since the time of the American Civil War. In resistance, Kevin Bruyneel asserts, indigenous political actors work across American spatial and temporal boundaries, demanding rights and resources from the government while also challenging the imposition of colonial rule over their lives. This resistance engenders what he calls a “third space of sovereignty,” which resides neither inside nor outside the U.S. political system but rather exists on its boundaries, exposing both the practices and limitations of American colonial rule....The Third Space of Sovereignty offers fresh insights on such topics as the crucial importance of the formal end of treaty-making in 1871, indigenous responses to the prospect of U.S. citizenship in the 1920s, native politics during the tumultuous civil rights era of the 1960s, the question of indigenousness in the special election of California’s governor in 2003, and the current issues surrounding gaming and casinos....In this engaging and provocative work, Bruyneel shows how native political actors have effectively contested the narrow limits that the United States has imposed on indigenous people’s ability to define their identity and to develop economically and politically on their own terms.

Those Who Remain : a Photographer's Memoir of South Carolina Indians / Gene J. Crediford.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2009.  211pp.  Main Library E78.S6 C74 2009 : When DeSoto (in 1540) and later Juan Pardo (in 1567) marched through what was known as the province of Cofitachequi (which covered the southern part of today’s North Carolina and most of South Carolina), the native population was estimated at well over 18,000. Most shared a common Catawba language, enabling this confederation of tribes to practice advanced political and social methods, cooperate and support each other, and meet their common enemy. The footprint of the Cofitachequi is the footprint of this book....The contemporary Catawba, Midland, Santee, Natchez-Kusso, Varnertown, Waccamaw, Pee Dee, and Lumbee Indians of North and South Carolina, have roots in pre-contact Cofitachequi. Names have changed through the years; tribes split and blended as the forces of nature, the influx of Europeans, and the imposition of federal government authority altered their lives. For a few of these tribes, the system has worked well—or is working well now. For others, the challenge continues to try to work with and within the federal government’s system for tribal recognition—a system governing Indians but not created by them. Through interviews and a generous photograph montage stretching over two decades, Gene Crediford reveals the commonality and diversity among these people of Indian identity; their heritage, culture, frustrations with the system, joys in success of the younger generation, and hope for the future of those who come after them. This book is the story of those who remain.

To intermix with our white brothers : Indian mixed bloods in the United States from the earliest times to the Indian removals / Thomas N. Ingersoll.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2005.  450pp.  Main Library E98.M63 I54 2005 : Ingersoll (history, Ohio State U.) examines the origins and early history of mixed blood Indians in North America, then follows the lives of individual mixed bloods in the early national period. Along the way, he describes the ways in which the Jacksonian American Indian removal policy appealed to popular racial prejudice and to fears of amalgamation. Ingersoll uses published and manuscript records to provide a detailed study of Indian removal programs and the reactions to them.

To live upon hope : Mohicans and missionaries in the eighteenth-century Northeast / Rachel Wheeler.  Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2008.  316pp.  Main Library E99.S8 W54 2008 : Two Northeast Indian communities with similar histories of colonization accepted Congregational and Moravian missionaries, respectively, within five years of one another: the Mohicans of Stockbridge, Massachusetts (1735), and Shekomeko, in Dutchess County, New York (1740). In To Live upon Hope, Rachel Wheeler explores the question of what "missionary Christianity" became in the hands of these two native communities....The Mohicans of Stockbridge and Shekomeko drew different conclusions from their experiences with colonial powers. Both tried to preserve what they deemed core elements of Mohican culture. The Indians of Stockbridge believed education in English cultural ways was essential to their survival and cast their acceptance of the mission project as a means of preserving their historic roles as cultural intermediaries. The Mohicans of Shekomeko, by contrast, sought new sources of spiritual power that might be accessed in order to combat the ills that came with colonization, such as alcohol and disease....Through extensive research, especially in the Moravian records of day-to-day life, Wheeler offers an understanding of the lived experience of Mohican communities under colonialism. She complicates the understanding of eighteenth-century American Christianity by demonstrating that mission programs were not always consumed by the destruction of indigenous culture and the advancement of imperial projects. In To Live upon Hope, Wheeler challenges the prevailing view of accommodation or resistance as the two poles of Indian responses to European colonization; colonialism placed severe strains on native peoples, yet Indians also exercised a level of agency and creativity that aided in their survival.

Today is a good day to fight : the Indian wars and the conquest of the West / Mark Felton.  Stroud, Gloucestershire : History Press, 2009.  224pp.  E81 .F45 2009 : Today is a Good Day to Fight covers the period from the initial penetration of the region by settlers and prospectors in the 1840s until the end of the Indian Wars in the 1890s. It explains the history of white-Indian conflict from the military point of view, showing how the United States used its army to wage terrible wars of conquest upon Native American peoples in order to take the land from them and enrich the growing nation, and how the Indians never really stood a chance in trying to defend their homelands. Highlighting the fractious and bitter relations between tribes unable and unwilling to unite in time to stave off their common enemy, it tries to portray the utter bitterness of the struggle between white and Indian, and how both sides resorted to increasingly foul acts of war and slaughter as the conflict progressed.

Transatlantic encounters : American Indians in Britain, 1500-1776 / Alden T. Vaughan.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.  337pp.  Main Library E77 .V35 2006 : Transatlantic Encounters examines the diverse origins and experiences of approximately 175 American Indians and Inuits who traveled to the British Isles before the American Revolution. Their homelands ranged from northern Canada to Brazil, their ages from infant to nonagenarian, their statuses from slave (the largest category) to "emperor," their occupations from warrior to missionary. Some American natives died soon after arrival, but others remained as long as fourteen years and returned home; still others, their arrival and death dates undocumented, may have endured long lives abroad. And always, Indians and Inuits fascinated the British people, whether the Americans were captives or on commercial display, interpreters-in-training, or voluntary voyagers to petition the monarch and tour Britain's famous sites. British artists painted their portraits and eminent writers invoked them in plays and essays. In the imperial crisis of 1776, Indian diplomats who had been to London would staunchly support the British Empire.

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930 / Kate Flint.    Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2009.  376pp.  Main Library PR151.I53 F57 2009 :  "This is an important work of scholarship. By examining British responses to the presence of Indians in the Americas, and especially in North America, Flint offers a genuinely original perspective on both the history of representation of the figure of the Indian and the history of Indian-white relations. Her readings are smart and always judicious."--Lucy Maddox, Georgetown University   "Truly brilliant. Flint does what very few writers have done before, which is to acknowledge the role Native Americans--and the often contradictory representations of them--played in the British imagination. She brings her keen literary sensibility and her wonderful ability to read the visual culture of the Victorian era to this book in ways that do considerable justice to the complexity and importance of this topic."--Joseph W. Childers, University of California, Riverside.  "An impressively comprehensive, ambitious, and informed book. Flint analyzes the cultural myths, stereotypes, and ideological constructions that shaped the understanding of Native Americans in a variety of British contexts and media, and also turns her lens upon Native American understandings of British culture.

Tribal Names of the Americas : Spelling Variants and Alternative Forms, Cross-Referenced / Patricia Roberts Clark.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2009.  313pp.  Main Library E54.5 .C55 2009 : Scholars have long worked to identify the names of tribes and other groupings in the Americas, a task made difficult by the sheer number of indigenous groups and the many names that have been passed down only through oral tradition. This book is a compendium of tribal names in all their variants--from North, Central and South America--collected from printed sources. Because most of these original sources reproduced words that had been encountered only orally, there is a great deal of variation. Organized alphabetically, this book collates these variations, traces them to the spellings and forms that have become standardized, and supplies see and see also references. Each main entry includes tribal name, the "parent group" or ancestral tribe, original source for the tribal name, and approximate location of the name in the original source material.

Tribal theory in Native American literature : Dakota and Haudenosaunee writing and indigenous worldviews / Penelope Myrtle Kelsey.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2008.  175pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 K46 2008 : Scholars and readers continue to wrestle with how best to understand and appreciate the wealth of oral and written literatures created by the Native communities of North America. Are critical frameworks developed by non-Natives applicable across cultures, or do they reinforce colonialist power and perspectives? Is it appropriate and useful to downplay tribal differences and instead generalize about Native writing and storytelling as a whole?...Focusing on Dakota writers and storytellers, Seneca critic Penelope Myrtle Kelsey offers a penetrating assessment of theory and interpretation in indigenous literary criticism in the twenty-first century. Tribal Theory in Native American Literature delineates a method for formulating a Native-centered theory or, more specifically, a use of tribal languages and their concomitant knowledges to derive a worldview or an equivalent to Western theory that is emic to indigenous worldviews. These theoretical frameworks can then be deployed to create insightful readings of Native American texts. Kelsey demonstrates this approach with a fresh look at early Dakota writers, including Marie McLaughlin, Charles Eastman, and Zitkala-Ša and later storytellers such as Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, Ella Deloria, and Philip Red Eagle....This book raises the provocative issue of how Native languages and knowledges were historically excluded from the study of Native American literature and how their encoding in early Native American texts destabilized colonial processes. Cogently argued and well researched, Tribal Theory in Native American Literature sets an agenda for indigenous literary criticism and invites scholars to confront the worlds behind the literatures that they analyze.

The truth about stories : a native narrative / Thomas King.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2005.  172pp.  Main Library PR9199.3.K4422 Z477 2005 : "Stories are wondrous things. And they are dangerous." In The Truth About Stories, Native novelist and scholar Thomas King explores how stories shape who we are and how we understand and interact with other people. From creation stories to personal experiences, historical anecdotes to social injustices, racist propaganda to works of contemporary Native literature, King probes Native culture's deep ties to storytelling. With wry humor, King deftly weaves events from his own life as a child in California, an academic in Canada, and a Native North American with a wide-ranging discussion of stories told by and about Indians. So many stories have been told about Indians, King comments, that "there is no reason for the Indian to be real. The Indian simply has to exist in our imaginations." That imaginative Indian that North Americans hold dear has been challenged by Native writers - N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Louis Owens, Robert Alexie, and others - who provide alternative narratives of the Native experience that question, create a present, and imagine a future. King reminds the reader, Native and non-Native, that storytelling carries with it social and moral responsibilties. "Don't say in the years to come that you would have lived your life differently if only you had heard this story. You've heard it now."

Uncommon Defense : Indian Allies in the Black Hawk War / John W. Hall.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  367pp.  Main Library E83.83 .H335 2009 : In the spring of 1832, when the Indian warrior Black Hawk and a thousand followers marched into Illinois to reoccupy lands earlier ceded to American settlers, the U.S. Army turned to rival tribes for military support. Elements of the Menominee, Dakota, Potawatomi, and Ho Chunk tribes willingly allied themselves with the United States government against their fellow Native Americans in an uncommon defense of their diverse interests. As the Black Hawk War came only two years after the passage of the Indian Removal Act and is widely viewed as a land grab by ravenous settlers, the military participation of these tribes seems bizarre. What explains this alliance?...In order to grasp Indian motives, John Hall explores their alliances in earlier wars with colonial powers as well as in intertribal antagonisms and conflicts. In the crisis of 1832, Indians acted as they had traditionally, leveraging their relationship with a powerful ally to strike tribal enemies, fulfill important male warrior expectations, and pursue political advantage and material gain. However, times had changed and, although the Indians achieved short-term objectives, they helped create conditions that permanently changed their world....Providing a rare view of Indian attitudes and strategies in war and peace, Hall deepens our understanding of Native Americans and the complex roles they played in the nation’s history. More broadly, he demonstrates the risks and lessons of small wars that entail an “uncommon defense” by unlikely allies in pursuit of diverse, even conflicting, goals.

Understanding Gerald Vizenor / Deborah L. Madsen.  Columbia : University of South Carolina Press, c2009. 193pp.  Main Library PS3572.I9 Z77 2009 : In this handy reference for scholars, students, and general readers, Madsen overviews the themes, imagery, and neologisms found in the work of Native American writer Gerald Vizenor's poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction. The book begins by addressing the biographical, tribal, and postmodern contexts in which Vizenor's work may be understood, then explores the original vocabulary he employs in his critiques of corporate greed, pollution, and the media.

Unearthing Indian land : living with the legacies of allotment / Kristin T. Ruppel.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2008.  227pp.  E98.L3 R87 2008 : It made news when competitive bidding came to Indian land as a result of the Supreme Court's striking down in 1987 and 1997 the "2 percent rule" of section 207 of the Indian Land Consolidation Act of 1983, which authorizes reservation land allotments of 2 percent or less to the tribe upon passing of the landowner -- without warning or compensation. Complementing Ruppel's examination of the troubled history of the federal government's quasi-privatization of Indian lands are his interviews with landowners, poems, and photos of un/logged reservation forests and a memorial to the Lehmi Indians who were forcibly removed to the Fort Hall reservation in Idaho in the early 1900s.

The unredeemed captive : a family story from early America / by John Demos.  New York : Knopf, 1994. 315pp.  Main Library E197 .D46 1994 : Early on the morning of February 29, 1704, before the settlers of Deerfield, Massachusetts, had stirred from their beds, a French and Indian war party opened fire, wielding hatchets and torches, on the lightly fortified town. What would otherwise have been a fairly commonplace episode of "Queen Anne's War" (as the War of the Spanish Succession was known in the colonies) achieved considerable notoriety in America and abroad. The reason: the Indians had managed to capture, among others, the eminent minister John Williams, his wife, Eunice Mather Williams, and their five children. This Puritan family par excellence, and more than a hundred of their good neighbors, were now at the mercy of "savages" - and the fact that these "savages" were French-speaking converts to Catholicism made the reversal of the rightful order of things no less shocking....In The Unredeemed Captive, John Demos, Yale historian and winner of the Bancroft Prize for his book Entertaining Satan, tells the story of the minister's captured daughter Eunice, who was seven years old at the time of the Deerfield incident and was adopted by a Mohawk family living at a Jesuit mission-fort near Montreal. Two and a half years later, when Reverend Williams was released and returned to Boston amid much public rejoicing, Eunice remained behind - her Mohawk "master" unwilling to part with her. And so began a decades-long effort, alternately hopeful and demoralizing for her kin, to "redeem" her. Indeed, Eunice became a cause celebre across New England, the subject of edifying sermons, fervent prayers, and urgent envoys between the Massachusetts Bay Colony and New France. But somehow she always remained just out of reach - until eventually, her father's worst fears were confirmed: Eunice was not being held against her will. On the contrary, she had forgotten how to speak English, had married a young Mohawk man, and could not be prevailed upon to return to Deerfield....Eunice's extraordinary and dramatic story speaks to broad, compelling themes that involve race, religion, the place of women in two societies, and, above all, contact between cultures ("Captivity, after all, meant 'contact' of a particularly vivid sort") and the crossing of cultural boundaries. For both colonists and Indians, the stakes were high in early-eighteenth-century America. Hence the boundaries were carefully patrolled: "To travel across them was costly and dangerous - and potentially transforming." The Unredeemed Captive traces just such a transformation - remarkable, profound, and uniquely American.

Uprising! : Woody Crumbo's Indian Art / by Robert Perry. Ada, Okla. : Chickasaw Press, c2009. 317pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection folio E 90 .C78 A6 2009 : The life of Woodrow "Woody" Crumbo (1912-1989) parallels the twentieth-century evolution of American Indian art. An accomplished Native dancer, flutist, silversmith, and poet, Crumbo is perhaps best known today for his oil paintings and silk screens--revolutionary artworks that were denigrated by some critics at first but that helped move Indian art to museums of fine art, as well as its markets. Now the life story of an Indian artist who often went against the grain is told by an accomplished Indian storyteller....Chickasaw author Robert Perry's interest in gathering and preserving elders' stories from neighboring tribes prompted him to write this long-awaited biography. Starting with a suitcase full of newspaper clippings provided by Crumbo's widow, Perry traced Crumbo's first flowering as an artist from his studies at Chilocco Indian School, where he befriended several Kiowas who taught him about their dances and regalia and introduced him to the traditional Kiowa cedar-wood flute....The book follows Crumbo from Chilocco to his studies at Wichita University and the University of Oklahoma, his years touring as an Indian dancer, and his position as director of art at Bacone College in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Later, Crumbo collaborated with Taos artists, helped organize Indian art exhibitions at the Gilcrease and Philbrook art museums in Tulsa, and directed the El Paso Museum of Art....Uprising! Woody Crumbo's Indian Art tells a compassionate and inspiring story as it fills a gap in the historical record regarding indigenous artists of the century just closed.

Victorio : Apache warrior and chief / by Kathleen P. Chamberlain.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2007.  242pp.  Main Library E99.W36 V533 2007 : A steadfast champion of his people during the wars with encroaching Anglo-Americans, the Apache chief Victorio deserves as much attention as his better-known contemporaries Cochise and Geronimo. In presenting the story of this nineteenth-century Warm Springs Apache warrior, Kathleen P. Chamberlain expands our understanding of Victorio's role in the Apache wars and brings him into the center of events....Although there is little documentation of Victorio's life outside military records, Chamberlain draws ethnographic sources to surmise his childhood and adolescence and depict traditional Warm Springs Apache social, religious, and economic life. Reconstructing Victorio's life beyond the military conflicts that have since come to define him, she interprets his character and actions not only as whites viewed them but also as the logical outcome of his upbringing and worldview. Chamberlain clarifies the connections between Apache leaders Cochise and Mangas Coloradas, with whom Victorio's life is intertwined, to explain their respective actions....Chamberlain's Victorio is a pragmatic leader and profoundly spiritual man. Caught in the absurdities of post-Civil War Indian policy, Victorio struggled with the glaring disconnect between the U.S. government's vision for Indians and their own physical, psychological, and spiritual needs. Victorio and his band peacefully endured life on reservations until living conditions there became abominable. Chamberlain shows that Victorio's ultimate flight to Mexico reflected dwindling options for Indians in the Southwest and his own loss of hope for reasonable treatment from American officials....Graced with historic photos of Victorio, other Apaches, and U.S. military leaders, this biography portrays Victorio as a leader who sought a peaceful homeland for his people in the face of wrongheaded decisions from Washington. It is the most complete and balanced picture yet to emerge of a Native leader caught in the conflicts and compromises of the nineteenth-century Southwest.

Violence over the land : Indians and empires in the early American West / Ned Blackhawk.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, c2006.  372pp.  Main Library E78.G67 B53 2006 : American Indians remain familiar as icons, yet poorly understood as historical agents. In this ambitious book that ranges across Utah, Nevada, New Mexico, Colorado, and eastern California (a region known as the Great Basin), Ned Blackhawk places Native peoples squarely at the center of a dynamic and complex story as he chronicles two centuries of Indian and imperial history that profoundly shaped the American West....On the distant margins of empire, Great Basin Indians increasingly found themselves engulfed in the chaotic storms of European expansion and responded in ways that refashioned themselves and those around them. Focusing on Ute, Paiute, and Shoshone Indians, Blackhawk illuminates this history through a lens of violence, excavating the myriad impacts of colonial expansion. Brutal networks of trade and slavery forged the Spanish borderlands, and the use of violence became for many Indians a necessary survival strategy, particularly after Mexican Independence when many became raiders and slave traffickers. Throughout such violent processes, these Native communities struggled to adapt to their changing environments, sometimes scoring remarkable political ends while suffering immense reprisals....Violence over the Land is a passionate reminder of the high costs that the making of American history occasioned for many indigenous peoples, written from the vantage point of an Indian scholar whose own family history is intimately bound up in its enduring legacies.

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Featured Books, W-Z

The War in Words : Reading the Dakota Conflict Through the Captivity Literature / Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  363pp.  Main Library E83.86 .D47 2009  : The War in Words is the first book to study the captivity and confinement narratives generated by a single American war as it traces the development and variety of the captivity narrative genre. Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola examines the complex 1862 Dakota Conflict (also called the Dakota War) by focusing on twenty-four of the dozens of narratives that European Americans and Native Americans wrote about it. This six-week war was the deadliest confrontation between whites and Dakotas in Minnesota’s history. Conducted at the same time as the Civil War, it is sometimes called Minnesota’s Civil War because it was—and continues to be—so divisive....The Dakota Conflict aroused impassioned prose from participants and commentators as they disputed causes, events, identity, ethnicity, memory, and the all-important matter of the war’s legacy. Though the study targets one region, its ramifications reach far beyond Minnesota in its attention to war and memory. An ethnography of representative Dakota Conflict narratives and an analysis of the war’s historiography, The War in Words includes new archival information, historical data, and textual criticism.

War of a thousand deserts : Indian raids and the U.S.-Mexican War / Brian DeLay.  New Haven : Yale University Press ; [Dallas, TX] : Published in association with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University, c2008.  473pp.  Main Library F800 .D45 2008 : In the early 1830s, after decades of relative peace, northern Mexicans and the Indians whom they called “the barbarians” descended into a terrifying cycle of violence. For the next fifteen years, owing in part to changes unleashed by American expansion, Indian warriors launched devastating attacks across ten Mexican states. Raids and counter-raids claimed thousands of lives, ruined much of northern Mexico’s economy, depopulated its countryside, and left man-made “deserts” in place of thriving settlements. Just as important, this vast interethnic war informed and emboldened U.S. arguments in favor of seizing Mexican territory while leaving northern Mexicans too divided, exhausted, and distracted to resist the American invasion and subsequent occupation....Exploring Mexican, American, and Indian sources ranging from diplomatic correspondence and congressional debates to captivity narratives and plains Indians’ pictorial calendars, War of a Thousand Deserts recovers the surprising and previously unrecognized ways in which economic, cultural, and political developments within native communities affected nineteenth-century nation-states. In the process this ambitious book offers a rich and often harrowing new narrative of the era when the United States seized half of Mexico’s national territory.

War Paths, Peace Paths : an Archaeology of Cooperation and Conflict in Native Eastern North America / David H. Dye.  Lanham : AltaMira Press, c2009.  217pp.  Main Library E78.E2 D94 2009 : The theme of this first comprehensive book on the archaeology of pre-Columbian warfare in eastern North America focuses upon how cooperation and competition, alliances and conflict, and peace and war coevolved over a 13,000-year period. Dye (archaeology, Univ. of Memphis) sets out his book's theoretical basis in the first two chapters. He places the evidence of increasing conflict within the context of climate change, increasing population levels, and social-political complexity through time. The author shows that violence among Paleoindian to Early Archaic hunters and gatherers was restricted to revenge killings, while with the emergence of tribal organizations in the Middle and Late Archaic, raiding became more prevalent. The development of horticulture in the Late Archaic that carried through the Early and Middle Woodland Adena and Hopewell resulted in an elaboration of raiding and feuding. The introduction of maize agriculture and the bow and arrow in Late Woodland Mississippian societies witnessed the rise of defensive fortifications and endemic warfare. There are three case studies--the Iroquois of the Northeast, the Oneota of the upper Midwest, and the Mississippians of the Midwest and Southeast--and a summary. A very informative text on the evolution of warfare in eastern North America.

War under heaven : Pontiac, the Indian Nations & the British Empire / Gregory Evans Dowd.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2002.  360pp.  Main Library E83.76 .D69 2002 : Dowd boldly reinterprets the causes and consequences of Pontiac's War. Where previous Anglocentric histories have ascribed this dramatic uprising to disputes over trade and land, this groundbreaking work traces the conflict back to status: both the low regard in which the British held the Indians and the concern among Native American leaders about their people's standing--and their sovereignty--in the eyes of the British. Pontiac's War also embodied a clash of world views, and Dowd examines the central role that Indian cultural practices and beliefs played in the conflict, explores the political and military culture of the British Empire which informed the attitudes its servants had toward Indians, provides insightful portraits of Pontiac and his British adversaries, and offers a detailed analysis of the military and diplomatic strategies of both sides.

Warriors in uniform : the legacy of American Indian heroism / by Herman J. Viola ; foreword by Carson Walks Over Ice ; introduction by Ben Nighthorse Campbell.  Washington, D.C. : National Geographic, c2008.  215pp.  Main Library E98.W2 V56 2008 : Native Americans have willingly served in the U.S. military during each of this country’s wars, and their current numbers in the armed forces exceed the percentage of any other ethnic group. Their stories encompass heroism and tragedy, humor and stoicism, loyalty and conflict—all part of the riveting experience of Warriors in Uniform. This illustrated history divulges the exploits of the last Confederate general—a Cherokee—to lay down his arms...the code talkers who used tribal languages to thwart the enemy in World War II...the first Native American woman to give her life as a soldier...those serving in Iraq today...and many others. Spiritual, poignant, gripping, even shocking (warriors still took scalps in Vietnam), it reveals how ancient traditions of war persevere and how the warrior designation is a great honor to the Native American community. Packed with first person accounts and sharing little-known insights into a culture that is still misunderstood, Warriors in Uniform is a page-turning epic and a stunning gallery of never-before-seen artifacts from personal collections. Former senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell and other distinguished Native Americans have contributed to the collection. Following on the success of Native Universe and Trail to Wounded Knee, this book is already generating great interest throughout the Native American community. As the only book to cover Native American warriors from the 1700s to present, it stands out among other titles on the market.

We Are At Home : Pictures of the Ojibwe People / Bruce White ; foreword by Gerald Vizenor.  St. Paul, MN : Minnesota Historical Society Press, c2007.  260pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection TR654 .W363 2007 : In this collection of stunning and storied photographs—ranging from daguerreotypes to studio portraits to snapshots—historian Bruce White explores historical images taken of Ojibwe people through 1950: A baby in a cradleboard. A family building a birch-bark canoe. Studio portraits of girlfriends. Snapshots from a grandmother’s album. These and other familiar scenes are showcased in We Are at Home: Pictures of the Ojibwe People....This rich record of Native history and culture is available through a quirk of history: white settlement of Minnesota coincided with the development of photographic processes that allowed itinerant and studio photographers to capture images of local people and scenes, including those of the Ojibwe, who had called Minnesota home for centuries. White considers the negotiation that went on between the photographers and the photographed—and what power the latter wielded....Ultimately, this book tells more about the people in the pictures—what they were doing on a particular day, how they came to be photographed, how they made use of costumes and props—than about the photographers who documented, and in some cases doctored, views of Ojibwe life. The result is a vivid history of a people at home in Minnesota’s landscape.

We will dance our truth : Yaqui history in Yoeme performances / David Delgado Shorter.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  373pp.  F1221.Y3 S47 2009 : In this innovative, performative approach to the expressive culture of the Yaqui (Yoeme) peoples of the Sonora and Arizona borderlands, David Delgado Shorter provides an altogether fresh understanding of Yoeme worldviews. Based on extensive field study, Shorter’s interpretation of the community’s ceremonies and oral traditions as forms of “historical inscription” reveals new meanings of their legends of the Talking Tree, their narrative of myth-and-history known as the Testamento, their fabled deer dances, funerary rites, and church processions....Working collaboratively with Yoeme communities, Shorter’s scrupulous investigation challenges received wisdom from both anthropological and New Age perspectives, demonstrates how Yoeme performances provide a counter-discourse to earlier understandings of colonialism and conquest, and updates our knowledge of contemporary Yoeme society. Through Shorter’s vivid descriptions and penetrating analyses we see for ourselves how today’s Yoeme peoples navigate the tribulations and opportunities of the twenty-first century.

Where a hundred soldiers were killed : the struggle for the Powder River country in 1866 and the making of the Fetterman myth / John H. Monnett.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, 2008.  316pp.  Main Library E83.866 .M674 2008 : Monnett first poses the rhetorical question "who cares about another interpretation of a battle?" then proceeds to offer just such a reinterpretation about the event known colloquially as the Fetterman Massacre. He takes frequent, direct issue with Dee Brown's 1962 Fort Phil Kearny and challenges a conclusion of Stephen Ambrose's Crazy Horse and Custer (1975). Monnett's two principal conclusions are that Fetterman was not the hotheaded Indian hater of conventional accounts, and neither Red Cloud nor Crazy Horse had any role in the fight. He cites both primary and secondary sources at length and carefully parses numerous quotations to support his conclusions. One wishes Monnett had researched his quotation from The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (p. 236) just a bit more carefully. The last chapter, on the genesis and perpetuation of the "Fetterman myth," is the best part of the book.

Where the lightning strikes : the lives of American Indian sacred places / Peter Nabokov.  New York : Viking, 2006.  350pp.  Main Library E98.R3 N33 2006 : For thousands of years Native Americans have told stories about the powers of revered landscapes and sought spiritual direction at mysterious locations in their homelands. In Where the Lightning Strikes, Peter Nabokov offers sixteen “biographies of place” that dramatize the rich diversity of Indian cultures and their religious systems across North America. From the mountains of Maine to TennesseeÂ's Tellico Valley, from the Black Hills of South Dakota to Rainbow Canyon in Arizona to the high country of northwestern California, each chapter explores a host of relationships between Indian cultures and their environments and describes the myths, legends, practices, and rituals that sustained them....Based on years of research and personal experience, Where the Lightning Strikes reveals a range of holy lands containing beneficial as well as malevolent forces and reminds us of the stubborn persistence of Indian beliefs in the sacredness of the American earth. [ religion, mythology, sacred space ]

White man's paper trail : grand councils and treaty-making on the Central Plains / Stan Hoig.  Boulder : University Press of Colorado, c2006.  245pp.  Main Library E78.G73 H577 2006 : Journalist and author Stan Hoig presents a poignant history of the U.S. government's attempts to peacefully negotiate treaties with the tribes of the Central Plains, from the friendship pacts of the early 1800s through the last formal treaty in 1871, when Congress put an end to treaty-making.  Drawing on records and transcripts of treaty councils in Missouri, Arkansas, the Dakotas, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, and Wyoming, Hoig reveals unequivocal testimony that documents countless fallacies and indiscretions by Euro-Americans in the making and enforcement of treaties.

White Mother to a Dark Race : Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940 / Margaret D. Jacobs.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  557pp.  Main Library E98.C89 J33 2009 : In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, indigenous communities in the United States and Australia suffered a common experience at the hands of state authorities: the removal of their children to institutions in the name of assimilating American Indians and protecting Aboriginal people. Although officially characterized as benevolent, these government policies often inflicted great trauma on indigenous families and ultimately served the settler nations’ larger goals of consolidating control over indigenous peoples and their lands....White Mother to a Dark Race takes the study of indigenous education and acculturation in new directions in its examination of the key roles white women played in these policies of indigenous child-removal. Government officials, missionaries, and reformers justified the removal of indigenous children in particularly gendered ways by focusing on the supposed deficiencies of indigenous mothers, the alleged barbarity of indigenous men, and the lack of a patriarchal nuclear family. Often they deemed white women the most appropriate agents to carry out these child-removal policies. Inspired by the maternalist movement of the era, many white women were eager to serve as surrogate mothers to indigenous children and maneuvered to influence public policy affecting indigenous people. Although some white women developed caring relationships with indigenous children and others became critical of government policies, many became hopelessly ensnared in this insidious colonial policy.

White people, Indians, and Highlanders : tribal peoples and colonial encounters in Scotland and America / Colin G. Calloway.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2008.  368pp.  Main Library E77 .C15 2008 : In nineteenth century paintings, the proud Indian warrior and the Scottish Highland chief appear in similar ways--colorful and wild, righteous and warlike, the last of their kind. Earlier accounts depict both as barbarians, lacking in culture and in need of civilization. By the nineteenth century, intermarriage and cultural contact between the two--described during the Seven Years' War as cousins--was such that Cree, Mohawk, Cherokee, and Salish were often spoken with Gaelic accents....In this imaginative work of imperial and tribal history, Colin Calloway examines why these two seemingly wildly disparate groups appear to have so much in common. Both Highland clans and Native American societies underwent parallel experiences on the peripheries of Britain's empire, and often encountered one another on the frontier. Indeed, Highlanders and American Indians fought, traded, and lived together. Both groups were treated as tribal peoples--remnants of a barbaric past--and eventually forced from their ancestral lands as their traditional food sources--cattle in the Highlands and bison on the Great Plains--were decimated to make way for livestock farming. In a familiar pattern, the cultures that conquered them would later romanticize the very ways of life they had destroyed....White People, Indians, and Highlanders illustrates how these groups alternately resisted and accommodated the cultural and economic assault of colonialism, before their eventual dispossession during the Highland Clearances and Indian Removals. What emerges is a finely-drawn portrait of how indigenous peoples with their own rich identities experienced cultural change, economic transformation, and demographic dislocation amidst the growing power of the British and American empires.

Wild men : Ishi and Kroeber in the wilderness of modern America / Douglas C. Sackman.  New York : Oxford University Press, c2009.  365pp.  E99.Y23 S235 2009 : When Ishi, "the last wild Indian;' came out of hiding in August 1911, he was quickly whisked away by train to San Francisco to meet Alfred Kroeber, one of the fathers of American anthropology. When Kroeber and Ishi came face to face, it was a momentous event, not only for each man but also for the cultures they represented. Each stood on the brink: one was in danger of losing something vital while the other was in danger of disappearing altogether....Ishi was a survivor, and he viewed the bright lights of the big city with a mixture of awe and bemusement. What surprised everyone is how handily he adapted himself to the modern city while maintaining his sense of self and his culture. He and his people had ingeniously used everything they could get their hands on from whites to survive in hiding, and now Ishi was doing the same in San Francisco. The wild man was in fact doubly civilized - he had his own culture, and he opened himself up to that of modern America. Kroeber was professionally trained to document Ishi's culture, his civilization. What he didn't count on was how deeply working with the man would lead him to question his own profession and his civilization - how it would rekindle a wildness of his own....Though Ishi's story has been told before in film and fiction, Wild Men is the first book to focus on the depth of Ishi and Kroeber's friendship and to explore what their intertwined stories tell us about Indian survival in modern America and about America's fascination with the wild even as it was becoming ever-more urban and modern. Wild Men is about two individuals and two worlds intimately brought together in ways that turned out to be at once inspiring and tragic. Each man stood looking at the other from the opposite edge of a chasm: they reached out in the hope of keeping the other from falling in.

William Fenton : Selected Writings / William N. Fenton ; edited and with an introduction by William A. Starna and Jack Campisi.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  375pp.  Main Library E99.I7 F463 2009 : William Fenton: Selected Writings brings together for the first time Fenton’s most influential writings on the Iroquois and anthropology, written across nearly six decades. This volume includes Fenton’s classic studies of such key issues as Iroquois folklore, factionalism, and the repatriation of material culture; discussions of theory and practice and the methodology of “upstreaming”; obituaries of colleagues and reviews of other studies of the Iroquois; and summaries of the early Conferences on Iroquois Research. This collection reveals much about the world of the Iroquois, past and present, as well as the career and accomplishments of Fenton himself.

Wise Women : from Pocahontas to Sarah Winnemucca, Remarkable Stories of Native American Trailblazers / edited by Cynthia Parzych.  Guilford, Conn. : TwoDot, 2009. 255pp.  Main Library F820.A1 S65 2009 : The 22 women defended their native traditions and people in various arenas, including politics and diplomacy, arts and education, and healing and magic. Contributors identified only by name draw from book-length histories, newspaper articles, and other published sources to recount the family and cultural background, activities, and heritage of each. There is no index.

The world we used to live in : remembering the powers of the medicine men / Vine Deloria, Jr.  Golden, Colo. : Fulcrum Pub., c2006. 237pp.  Main Library E98.M4 D45 2006 : In this last book by Deloria (d. 2005), a leading Native American scholar/philosopher seeks a corrective to the erosion of genuine spirituality among today's generation of Native Americans. He introduces collected stories of the powers and rituals of traditional medicine men and women in light of modern science. These tales e.g., of healing, changing the weather, and inter-species communication, were related by Native people and some white observers. [ shamans, medicine, religion ]

Writing Indian, Native Conversations / John Lloyd Purdy.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  282pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 P87 2009  : Since N. Scott Momaday’s 1969 Pulitzer Prize for House Made of Dawn brought Native American fiction squarely into mainstream culture, the genre has expanded in different ways and in new directions. The result is a Native American–written literature that requires a variety of critical approaches, including a discussion of how this canon differs from the familiar, established canons of American literature. Drawing on personal experience as well as literary scholarship, John Lloyd Purdy brings the traditions of Native American fiction into conversation with ideas about the past, present, and future of Native literatures....By revisiting some of the classics of the genre and offering critical readings of their distinctive qualities and shades of meaning, Purdy celebrates their dynamic literary qualities. Interwoven with this personal reflection on the last thirty years of work in the genre are interviews with prominent Native American scholars and writers (including Paula Gunn Allen, Simon Ortiz, Gerald Vizenor, Sherman Alexie, and Louis Owens), who offer their own insights about Native literatures and the future of the genre. In this book their voices provide the original, central conversation that leads to readings of specific novels. At once a journey of discovery for readers new to the canon and an intimate, fresh reunion with important novels for those well versed in Native studies, Writing Indian, Native Conversations invites all comers to participate in a communal conversation.

The Yale Indian : the Education of Henry Roe Cloud / Joel Pfister.  Durham [N.C.] : Duke University Press, 2009.  259pp.  Main Library E90.C48 P45 2009 : Honored in his own time as one of the most prominent Indian public intellectuals, Henry Roe Cloud (c.1884-1950) fought to open higher education to Indians. Joel Pfister's extensive archival research establishes the historical significance of key chapters in the Winnebago's remarkable life. Roe Cloud was the first Indian to receive undergraduate and graduate degrees from Yale University, where he was elected to the prestigious and intellectual Elihu Club. Pfister compares Roe Cloud's experience to that of other "college Indians" and also to African Americans such as W.E.B. Du Bois. Roe Cloud helped launch the Society of American Indians, graduated from Auburn seminary, founded a preparatory school for Indians, and served as the first Indian superintendent of the Haskell Institute (forerunner of Haskell Indian Nations University). He also worked under John Collier at the Bureau of Indian Affairs, where he was a catalyst for the Indian New Deal.

The year the stars fell : Lakota winter counts at the Smithsonian / edited by Candace S. Greene and Russell Thornton.  Washington D.C. : Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History : Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian ; Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2007.  347pp.  Main Library E99.D1 Y43 2007 : Winter counts—pictorial calendars by which Plains Indians kept track of their past—marked each year with a picture of a memorable event. The Lakota, or Western Sioux, recorded many different events in their winter counts, but all include “the year the stars fell,” the spectacular Leonid meteor shower of 1833–34. This volume is an unprecedented assemblage of information on the important collection of Lakota winter counts at the Smithsonian, a core resource for the study of Lakota history and culture. Fourteen winter counts are presented in detail, with a chapter devoted to the newly discovered Rosebud Winter Count. Together these counts constitute a visual chronicle of over two hundred years of Lakota experience as recorded by Native historians....A visually stunning book, The Year the Stars Fell features full-color illustrations of the fourteen winter counts plus more than 900 detailed images of individual pictographs. Explanations, provided by their nineteenth-century Lakota recorders, are arranged chronologically to facilitate comparison among counts. The book provides ready access to primary source material, and serves as an essential reference work for scholars as well as an invaluable historical resource for Native communities.

The Yuma reclamation project : irrigation, Indian allotment, and settlement along the lower Colorado River / Robert A. Sauder.  Reno : University of Nevada Press, c2009.  274pp.  Main Library TC824.A6 S25 2009 : A meticulously researched historical account of the Yuma Reclamation Project (authorized in 1904), one of the first federal irrigation projects in the Western United States. Chapters scrutinize in depth the myriad obstacles encountered just to get the program started, its impact, and its legacy up to the modern day. A thoughtful analysis of economic and social as well as environmental factors of the time, The Yuma Reclamation Project is sufficiently thorough to satisfy professional scholars yet thoroughly accessible to readers of all backgrounds.

Zamumo's Gifts : Indian-European Exchange in the Colonial Southeast / Joseph M. Hall, Jr.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 2009.  232pp.  Main Library E78.S65 H35 2009  : In 1540, Zamumo, the chief of the Altamahas in central Georgia, exchanged gifts with the Spanish conquistador Hernando de Soto. With these gifts began two centuries of exchanges that bound American Indians and the Spanish, English, and French who colonized the region. Whether they gave gifts for diplomacy or traded commodities for profit, Natives and newcomers alike used the exchange of goods such as cloth, deerskin, muskets, and sometimes people as a way of securing their influence. Gifts and trade enabled early colonies to survive and later colonies to prosper. Conversely, they upset the social balance of chiefdoms like Zamumo's and promoted the rise of new and powerful Indian confederacies like the Creeks and the Choctaws....Drawing on archaeological studies, colonial documents from three empires, and Native oral histories, Joseph M. Hall, Jr., offers fresh insights into broad segments of southeastern colonial history, including the success of Florida's Franciscan missionaries before 1640 and the impact of the Indian slave trade on French Louisiana after 1699. He also shows how gifts and trade shaped the Yamasee War, which pitted a number of southeastern tribes against English South Carolina in 1715-17. The exchanges at the heart of Zamumo's Gifts highlight how the history of Europeans and Native Americans cannot be understood without each other.

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Book Covers, T-Z


The Tainted Gift : the Disease Method of Frontier Expansion / Barbara Alice Mann. Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2009.

The Tainted Gift : the Disease Method of Frontier Expansion


Talking back to civilization : Indian voices from the Progressive Era

Talking back to civilization : Indian voices from the Progressive Era


Teaching Native America Across the Curriculum : a Critical Inquiry

Teaching Native America Across the Curriculum : a Critical Inquiry


Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History

Term Paper Resource Guide to American Indian History


The texture of contact : European and Indian settler communities on the frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783

The texture of contact : European and Indian settler communities on the frontiers of Iroquoia, 1667-1783


They know who they are

They know who they are


The third space of sovereignty : the postcolonial politics of U.S.-indigenous relations

The third space of sovereignty : the postcolonial politics of U.S.-indigenous relations


Those Who Remain : a Photographer's Memoir of South Carolina Indians

Those Who Remain : a Photographer's Memoir of South Carolina Indians


To intermix with our white brothers : Indian mixed bloods in the United States from the earliest times to the Indian removals

To intermix with our white brothers : Indian mixed bloods in the United States from the earliest times to the Indian removals


To live upon hope : Mohicans and missionaries in the eighteenth-century Northeast

To live upon hope : Mohicans and missionaries in the eighteenth-century Northeast


Today is a good day to fight : the Indian wars and the conquest of the West

Today is a good day to fight : the Indian wars and the conquest of the West


Transatlantic encounters : American Indians in Britain, 1500-1776

Transatlantic encounters : American Indians in Britain, 1500-1776


The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930

The Transatlantic Indian, 1776-1930


Tribal theory in Native American literature : Dakota and Haudenosaunee writing and indigenous worldviews

Tribal theory in Native American literature : Dakota and Haudenosaunee writing and indigenous worldviews


The truth about stories : a native narrative

The truth about stories : a native narrative


Uncommon Defense : Indian Allies in the Black Hawk War

Uncommon Defense : Indian Allies in the Black Hawk War


Understanding Gerald Vizenor

Understanding Gerald Vizenor


Unearthing Indian land : living with the legacies of allotment

Unearthing Indian land : living with the legacies of allotment


The unredeemed captive : a family story from early America

The unredeemed captive : a family story from early America


Uprising! : Woody Crumbo's Indian Art

Uprising! : Woody Crumbo's Indian Art


Victorio : Apache warrior and chief

Victorio : Apache warrior and chief


Violence over the land : Indians and empires in the early American West

Violence over the land : Indians and empires in the early American West


The War in Words : Reading the Dakota Conflict Through the Captivity Literature

The War in Words : Reading the Dakota Conflict Through the Captivity Literature


War of a thousand deserts : Indian raids and the U.S.-Mexican War

War of a thousand deserts : Indian raids and the U.S.-Mexican War


War Paths, Peace Paths : an Archaeology of Cooperation and Conflict in Native Eastern North America

War Paths, Peace Paths : an Archaeology of Cooperation and Conflict in Native Eastern North America


War under heaven : Pontiac, the Indian Nations & the British Empire

War under heaven : Pontiac, the Indian Nations & the British Empire


Warriors in uniform : the legacy of American Indian heroism

Warriors in uniform : the legacy of American Indian heroism


We Are At Home : Pictures of the Ojibwe People

We Are At Home : Pictures of the Ojibwe People


We will dance our truth : Yaqui history in Yoeme performances

We will dance our truth : Yaqui history in Yoeme performances


Where a hundred soldiers were killed : the struggle for the Powder River country in 1866 and the making of the Fetterman myth

Where a hundred soldiers were killed : the struggle for the Powder River country in 1866 and the making of the Fetterman myth


Where the lightning strikes : the lives of American Indian sacred places

Where the lightning strikes : the lives of American Indian sacred places


White man's paper trail : grand councils and treaty-making on the Central Plains

White man's paper trail : grand councils and treaty-making on the Central Plains


White Mother to a Dark Race : Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940

White Mother to a Dark Race : Settler Colonialism, Maternalism, and the Removal of Indigenous Children in the American West and Australia, 1880-1940


White people, Indians, and Highlanders : tribal peoples and colonial encounters in Scotland and America

White people, Indians, and Highlanders : tribal peoples and colonial encounters in Scotland and America


Wild men : Ishi and Kroeber in the wilderness of modern America

Wild men : Ishi and Kroeber in the wilderness of modern America


Wise Women : from Pocahontas to Sarah Winnemucca, Remarkable Stories of Native American Trailblazers

Wise Women : from Pocahontas to Sarah Winnemucca, Remarkable Stories of Native American Trailblazers


The world we used to live in : remembering the powers of the medicine men

The world we used to live in : remembering the powers of the medicine men


The Yale Indian : the Education of Henry Roe Cloud

The Yale Indian : the Education of Henry Roe Cloud


The year the stars fell : Lakota winter counts at the Smithsonian

The year the stars fell : Lakota winter counts at the Smithsonian


The Yuma reclamation project : irrigation, Indian allotment, and settlement along the lower Colorado River

The Yuma reclamation project : irrigation, Indian allotment, and settlement along the lower Colorado River


Zamumo's Gifts : Indian-European Exchange in the Colonial Southeast

Zamumo's Gifts : Indian-European Exchange in the Colonial Southeast


Michigan State University