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Michigan State University

Native American Studies Research Guide: New Books, 2010-2012

Contents

A compilation of recent Native American acquisitions by the MSU Libraries. Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check online catalog for latest information on location and status.

General Tips and Advice

  • Check the MSU Online Catalog for books, videos, and more.  Note that the MSU Online Catalog is a union catalog which includes the holdings of the Library of Michigan, the MSU College of Law Library, and other branches on our own campus.

  • Do a wider search using MelCat (a  network of participating Michigan libraries) or WorldCat (searches thousands of libraries). You can request non-MSU Library materials through interlibrary loan. NOTE: Not all materials listed in MelCat or WorldCat can be borrowed through interlibrary loan, but many can.

  • Don't forget to use the bibliographies in reference works, books, and articles to identify other resources on your topic.

Book Covers, A-C


Across a great divide : continuity and change in native North American societies, 1400-1900

Across a great divide : continuity and change in native North American societies, 1400-1900


Advanced civilizations of prehistoric America : the lost kingdoms of the Adena, Hopewell, Mississippians, and Anasazi

Advanced civilizations of prehistoric America : the lost kingdoms of the Adena, Hopewell, Mississippians, and Anasazi


Alexander McGillivray and the Creek Confederacy : the struggle for the Southern backcountry

Alexander McGillivray and the Creek Confederacy : the struggle for the Southern backcountry


All Indians do not live in teepees (or casinos)

All Indians do not live in teepees (or casinos)


American Indian/First Nations schooling : from the Colonial period to the present

American Indian/First Nations schooling : from the Colonial period to the present


American Indian nations from termination to restoration, 1953-2006

American Indian nations from termination to restoration, 1953-2006


American Indian politics and the American political system

American Indian politics and the American political system


American indians and popular culture

American indians and popular culture


American indians and the American imaginary : cultural representation across the centuries

American indians and the American imaginary : cultural representation across the centuries


American Indians and the market economy, 1775-1850

American Indians and the market economy, 1775-18506


American Indians and the mass media

American Indians and the mass media


America's hundred years' war : U.S. expansion to the Gulf Coast and the fate of the Seminole, 1763-1858

America's hundred years' war : U.S. expansion to the Gulf Coast and the fate of the Seminole, 1763-1858


Ancient complexities : new perspectives in Precolumbian North America

Ancient complexities : new perspectives in Precolumbian North America


Ancient households of the Americas : conceptualizing what households do

Ancient households of the Americas : conceptualizing what households do


Anetso, the Cherokee ball game : at the center of ceremony and identity

Anetso, the Cherokee ball game : at the center of ceremony and identity


The art of Americanization at the Carlisle Indian School

The art of Americanization at the Carlisle Indian School


The assassination of Hole in the Day

The assassination of Hole in the Day


Becoming Indian : the struggle over Cherokee identity in the twenty-first century

Becoming Indian : the struggle over Cherokee identity in the twenty-first century


Beyond the asterisk : understanding Native students in higher education

Beyond the asterisk : understanding Native students in higher education


Blackbird's song : Andrew J. Blackbird and the Odawa people

Blackbird's song : Andrew J. Blackbird and the Odawa people


Bureau of Indian Affairs

Bureau of Indian Affairs


Cahokia : Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi

Cahokia : Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi


Captive! : the story of David Ogden and the Iroquois

Captive! : the story of David Ogden and the Iroquois


The Catholic Calumet : Colonial Conversions in French and Indian North America

The Catholic Calumet : Colonial Conversions in French and Indian North America


Chief Loco : Apache peacemaker

Chief Loco : Apache peacemaker


Commerce by a frozen sea : Native Americans and the European fur trade

Commerce by a frozen sea : Native Americans and the European fur trade


Contested territories : nativeAmericans and non-natives in the lower Great Lakes, 1700-1850

Contested territories : nativeAmericans and non-natives in the lower Great Lakes, 1700-1850


Conversations with remarkable Native Americans

Conversations with remarkable Native Americans


Crafting history in the northern plains : a political economy of the Heart river region, 1400-1750

Crafting history in the northern plains : a political economy of the Heart river region, 1400-1750


Crooked paths to allotment : the fight over federal Indian policy after the Civil war

Crooked paths to allotment : the fight over federal Indian policy after the Civil war


Book Covers, D-H


Daily life during the Indian Wars

Daily life during the Indian Wars


Deconstructing the Cherokee nation : town, region, and nation among eighteenth-century Cherokees

Deconstructing the Cherokee nation : town, region, and nation among eighteenth-century Cherokees


Deep waters : the textual continuum in American Indian literature

Deep waters : the textual continuum in American Indian literature


Disinherited generations : our struggle to reclaim treaty rights for First Nations women and their descendants

Disinherited generations : our struggle to reclaim treaty rights for First Nations women and their descendants


Driven West : Andrew Jackson's trail of tears to the Civil War

Driven West : Andrew Jackson's trail of tears to the Civil War


The eagle returns : the legal history of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

The eagle returns : the legal history of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians


Eating the landscape : American Indian stories of food, identity, and resilience

Eating the landscape : American Indian stories of food, identity, and resilience


The edge of the woods : Iroquoia, 1534-1701

The edge of the woods : Iroquoia, 1534-1701


Engaged resistance : American Indian art, literature, and film from Alcatraz to the NMAI

Engaged resistance : American Indian art, literature, and film from Alcatraz to the NMAI


The erotics of sovereignty : queer native writing in the era of self-determination


Federal fathers and mothers : the United States Indian Service, 1869-1933

Federal fathers and mothers : the United States Indian Service, 1869-1933


Field man : life as a desert archaeologist

Field man : life as a desert archaeologist


The first frontier : the forgotten history of struggle, savagery, and endurance in early America

The first frontier : the forgotten history of struggle, savagery, and endurance in early America


Firsting and lasting : writing Indians out of existence in New England

Firsting and lasting : writing Indians out of existence in New England


For indigenous minds only : a decolonization handbook

For indigenous minds only : a decolonization handbook


The forced removal of American Indians from the northeast : a history of territorial cessions and relocations, 1620-1854

The forced removal of American Indians from the northeast : a history of territorial cessions and relocations, 1620-1854


From Chicaza to Chickasaw : the European invasion and the transformation of the Mississippian world, 1540-1715

From Chicaza to Chickasaw : the European invasion and the transformation of the Mississippian world, 1540-1715


The Frontier Newspapers and the Coverage of the Plains Indian Wars

The Frontier Newspapers and the Coverage of the Plains Indian Wars


Fur, fortune, and empire : the epic history of the fur trade in America

Fur, fortune, and empire : the epic history of the fur trade in America


Hand talk : sign language among American Indian nations

Hand talk : sign language among American Indian nations


Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power

Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power


Holding our world together : Ojibwe women and the survival of community

Holding our world together : Ojibwe women and the survival of community


The house on Diamond Hill : a Cherokee plantation story

The house on Diamond Hill : a Cherokee plantation story


The Huron-Wendat feast of the dead : Indian-European encounters in early North America

The Huron-Wendat feast of the dead : Indian-European encounters in early North America


Book Covers, L-N


The Lakotas and the Black Hills : the struggle for sacred ground

The Lakotas and the Black Hills : the struggle for sacred ground


The last stand : Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

The last stand : Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn


Laughing Whitefish

Laughing Whitefish


Legends of American Indian resistance

Legends of American Indian resistance


Life at the Kiowa, Comanche, and Wichita Agency : the Photographs of Annette Ross Hume

Life at the Kiowa, Comanche, and Wichita Agency : the Photographs of Annette Ross Hume


Living in two worlds : the American Indian experience illustrated

Living in two worlds : the American Indian experience illustrated


The long journey of the Nez Perce : a battle history from Cottonwood to the Bear Paw

The long journey of the Nez Perce : a battle history from Cottonwood to the Bear Paw


Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South : race, identity, and the making of a nation

Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South : race, identity, and the making of a nation


Mark my words : native women mapping our nations

Mark my words : native women mapping our nations


The memory of all ancient customs : Native American diplomacy in the colonial Hudson Valley

The memory of all ancient customs : Native American diplomacy in the colonial Hudson Valley


The militarization of Indian country

The militarization of Indian country


Mississippi's American Indians

Mississippi's American Indians


Native acts : law, recognition, and cultural authenticity

Native acts : law, recognition, and cultural authenticity


Native American adoption, captivity, and slavery in changing contexts

Native American adoption, captivity, and slavery in changing contexts


Native American boarding schools

Native American boarding schools


The Native American Mascot Controversy : A Handbook

The Native American Mascot Controversy : A Handbook


Native American son : the life and sporting legend of Jim Thorpe

Native American son : the life and sporting legend of Jim Thorpe


Native American Voices : a Reader / [compiled by] Susan Lobo, Steve Talbot, and Traci L. Morris. Upper Saddle River, NJ : Prentice Hall, c2010.

Native American Voices : a Reader


The Native American warrior, 1500-1890 CE

The Native American warrior, 1500-1890 CE


Native Americans and the legacy of Harry S. Truman

Native Americans and the legacy of Harry S. Truman


Native Americans, Christianity, and the reshaping of the American religious landscape

Native Americans, Christianity, and the reshaping of the American religious landscape


Native authenticity : transnational perspectives on Native American literary studies

Native authenticity : transnational perspectives on Native American literary studies


Native footsteps : along the path of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha

Native footsteps : along the path of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha


Native historians write back : decolonizing American Indian history

Native historians write back : decolonizing American Indian history


Navajo talking picture : cinema on native ground

Navajo talking picture : cinema on native ground


Navajos wear Nikes : a reservation life

Navajos wear Nikes : a reservation life


The networked wilderness : communicating in early New England

The networked wilderness : communicating in early New England


The new politics of Indian gaming : the rise of reservation interest groups

The new politics of Indian gaming : the rise of reservation interest groups


North American Indians : a very short introduction

North American Indians : a very short introduction


The northern Cheyenne exodus in history and memory

The northern Cheyenne exodus in history and memory


Notes from a miner's canary : essays on the state of Native America

Notes from a miner's canary : essays on the state of Native America


Notes from the center of Turtle Island

Notes from the center of Turtle Island


Featured Books, A-D

Across a great divide : continuity and change in native North American societies, 1400-1900 / edited by Laura L. Scheiber and Mark D. Mitchell.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.  342pp.  Main Library E98.S67 A26 2010 : In 13 essays revised from presentations at an October 2007 symposium of the Amerind Foundation, anthropologists from across the US seek to identify and transcend the colonial discourse that has colored accounts of change in Native American societies during the centuries before and after European contact. Their topics include agency and practice in Apalachee Province, Creek factionalism and the colonial southeastern frontier, the archaeology of nativism among the 19th-century Algonquin peoples of Illinois, French impact on Wichita technology and society, Navajo ethnogenesis in the northern southwest 1500-1750, and identity collectives and religious colonialism in coastal western Alaska.

Advanced civilizations of prehistoric America : the lost kingdoms of the Adena, Hopewell, Mississippians, and Anasazi / Frank Joseph.  Rochester, VT : Bear, c2010.  310pp.  Main Library E77 .J785 2010 : Before Rome ruled the Classical World, gleaming stone pyramids stood amid smoking iron foundries from North America’s Atlantic seaboard to the Mississippi River. On its east bank, across from today’s St. Louis, Missouri, flourished a walled city more populous than London was one thousand years ago, with a pyramid larger--at its base--than Egypt’s Great Pyramid. During the 12th century, hydraulic engineers laid out a massive irrigation network spanning the American Southwest that, if laid end to end, would stretch from Phoenix, Arizona, to the Canadian border. On a scale to match, they built a five-mile-wide dam from ten million cubic yards of rock. While Europe stumbled through the Dark Ages, a metropolis of weirdly shaped, multistory superstructures, precisely aligned to the sun and moon, sprawled across the New Mexico Desert....Who was responsible for such colossal achievements? Where did their mysterious builders come from, and what became of them? These are some of the questions investigated by Frank Joseph in his examination of ancient influences at work on our continent. He reveals that modern civilization is not the first to arise in North America but was preceded instead by four high cultures that rose and fell over the past three thousand years: the Adena, Hopewell, Mississippian, and Anasazi-Hohokam. How they achieved greatness and why they vanished so completely are the intriguing enigmas explored by this unconventional prehistory of our country, Advanced Civilizations of Prehistoric America.

Alexander McGillivray and the Creek Confederacy : the struggle for the Southern backcountry / R. Michael Pryor.  Chicago, Ill. : Pryolino Press, c2010.  183pp.  Main Library E99.C9 P79 2010 : Ethnicity, Economics, and Warfare! These were the factors that controlled the southern backcountry during the eighteenth century. Alexander McGillivray was by far one of the most influential Native American leaders from the Revolutionary and Federalist era. He became a central figure in the territorial struggles for commerce, sovereignty and the basic right to exist as a people. In order to defend the borders of the Creek Confederacy McGillivray used an amazing mixture of political shrewdness, economic monopolization, and diplomatic finesse. During his relatively brief life of forty-three years he was commissioned as a British officer, Spanish colonel, and American brigadier general. However, throughout all of these seemingly conflicting positions he maintained an unyielding pro-Native American identity.

All Indians do not live in teepees (or casinos) / Catherine C. Robbins.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.  385pp.  Main Library E98.S7 R64 2011 : Both a tribute to the unique experiences of individual Native Americans and a celebration of the values that draw American Indians together, All Indians Do Not Live in Teepees (or Casinos) explores contemporary Native life....Based on personal experience and grounded in journalism, this story begins with the repatriation of ancestral remains to the Pueblo peoples of New Mexico. The 1999 return to Pecos of the skeletal remains of two thousand bodies excavated during an archaeological expedition nearly a century earlier was the largest repatriation in American history. In a united, purposeful, and energizing quest, the Pecos and Jemez Indians brought their ancestors home. This event, along with subsequent repatriations, has accelerated similar momentum across much of Native America....In All Indians Do Not Live in Teepees (or Casinos), Catherine C. Robbins traces this restorative effect in areas such as economic development, urbanization, the arts, science, and health care. Through dozens of interviews, Robbins draws out the voices of Indian people, some well-known and many at the grassroots level, working quietly to advance their communities. These voices speak against the background of the narrative’s historical context. The result is a rich account of Native American life in contemporary America, revealing not a monolithic “Indian” experience of teepees or casinos, but rather a mosaic of diverse peoples existing on a continuum that marks both their distinctions and their shared realities.

America's hundred years' war : U.S. expansion to the Gulf Coast and the fate of the Seminole, 1763-1858 / edited by William S. Belko.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2011.  279pp.  Main Library E83.817 .A64 2011 : Conventional history narratives tell us that in the early years of the Republic, the United States fought three wars against the Seminole Indians and two against the Creeks. However, William Belko and the contributors to America's Hundred Years' War argue that we would do better to view these events as moments of heightened military aggression punctuating a much longer period of conflict in the Gulf Coast region....Featuring essays on topics ranging from international diplomacy to Seminole military strategy, the volume urges us to reconsider the reasons for and impact of early U.S. territorial expansion. It highlights the actions and motivations of Indians and African Americans during the period and establishes the groundwork for research that is more balanced and looks beyond the hopes and dreams of whites....America's Hundred Years' War offers more than a chronicle of the politics and economics of international rivalry. It provides a narrative of humanity and inhumanity, arrogance and misunderstanding, and outright bloodshed between vanquisher and vanquished as well.

American Indian/First Nations schooling : from the Colonial period to the present / Charles L. Glenn.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.238pp.   Main Library E97 .G58 2011 : Tracing the history of Native American schooling in North America, this book emphasizes factors in society at large – and sometimes within indigenous communities – which led to Native American children being separate from the white majority. Charles Glenn examines the evolving assumptions about race and culture as applied to schooling, the reactions of parents and tribal leadership in the United States and Canada, and the symbolic as well as practical role of indigenous languages and of efforts to maintain them.

American Indian nations from termination to restoration, 1953-2006 / Roberta Ulrich.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2010.  311pp.  Main Library E93 .U45 2010 : When the U.S. government ended its relationship with dozens of Native American tribes and bands between 1953 and 1966, it was engaging in a massive social experiment. Congress enacted the program, known as termination, in the name of "freeing" the Indians from government restrictions and improving their quality of life. However, removing the federal status of more than nine dozen tribes across the country plunged many of their nearly 13,000 members into deeper levels of poverty and croded the tribal people's sense of Native identity. Beginning in 1973 and extending over a twenty-year period, the terminated tribes, one by one, persuaded Congress to restore their ties to the federal government. Nonetheless, so much damage had been done that even today the restored tribes struggle to overcome the problems created by those terminations a half century ago....Roberta Ulrich provides a concise overview of all the terminations and restorations of Native American tribes from 1953 to 2006 and explores the enduring policy implications for Native peoples. This is the first book to consider all the terminations and restorations in the twentieth century as part of continuing policy while detailing some of the individual tribal differences. Drawing from Congressional records, interviews with tribal members, and other primary sources, Ulrich delves into the causes and effects of termination and restoration from both sides.

American Indian politics and the American political system / David E. Wilkins and Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, c2011.  3rd edition, 339pp.  Main Library E98.T77 W545 2011 : Now in its third edition, American Indian Politics and the American Political System is the most comprehensive study written from a political science perspective that analyzes the structures and functions of indigenous governments (including Alaskan Native communities and Hawaiian Natives) and the distinctive legal and political rights these nations exercise internally, while also examining the fascinating intergovernmental relationship that exists between native nations, the states, and the federal government....The third edition contains a number of important modifications. First, it is now coauthored by Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, who brings a spirited new voice to the study. Second, it contains ample discussion of how President Obama's election has altered the dynamics of Indian Country politics and law. Third, it contains more discussion of women's issues, several new vignettes, an updated timeline, new photographs, and updated charts, tables, and figures.

American indians and popular culture / Elizabeth DeLaney Hoffman, editor.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2012.  2 volumes  Main Library E98.P99 A465 2012 : The two-volume American Indians and Popular Culture seeks to help readers understand American Indians by analyzing their relationships with the popular culture of the United States and Canada. Volume 1 covers media, sports, and politics, while Volume 2 covers literature, arts, and resistance. Both volumes focus on stereotypes, detailing how they were created and why they are still allowed to exist....In defining popular culture broadly to include subjects such as print advertising, politics, and science as well as literature, film, and the arts, this work offers a comprehensive guide to the important issues facing Native peoples today. Analyses draw from many disciplines and include many voices, ranging from surveys of movies and discussions of Native authors to first-person accounts from Native perspectives. Among the more intriguing subjects are the casinos that have changed the economic landscape for the tribes involved, the controversy surrounding museum treatments of American Indians, and the methods by which American Indians have fought back against pervasive ethnic stereotyping.

American indians and the American imaginary : cultural representation across the centuries / Pauline Turner Strong.  Boulder : Paradigm Publishers, c2012.  233pp. Main Library  E98.P99 S77 2012 : While American Indians have received recognition and a degree of prominence for their intellectual, artistic, and activist achievements, it may surprise many that at least in some instances American Indians remain saddled with representations that have persisted through colonial times: redskins, tepees, tomahawks, tom-toms. Strong (anthropology and gender studies, U. of Texas at Austin) explores the phenomenon, how it came to be, its use, and how representations have changed through social life. In addition to examining the topic in depth, the author also underscores the importance of the study of representations in disciplines such as humanities and the social sciences as well as cultural studies.

American Indians and the market economy, 1775-1850 / edited by Lance Greene and Mark R. Plane ; foreword by Timothy K. Perttula.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2010.  131pp.  Main Library  E98.M34 A45 2010:The last quarter of the 18th century was a period of extensive political, economic, and social change in North America, as the continent-wide struggle between European superpowers waned. Native groups found themselves enmeshed in the market economy and new state forms of control, among other new threats to their cultural survival. Native populations throughout North America actively engaged the expanding marketplace in a variety of economic and social forms. These actions, often driven by and expressed through changes in material culture, were supported by a desire to maintain distinctive ethnic identities....Illustrating the diversity of Native adaptations in an increasingly hostile and marginalized world, this volume is continental in scope—ranging from Connecticut to the Carolinas, and westward through Texas and Colorado. Calling on various theoretical perspectives, the authors provide nuanced perspectives on material culture use as a manipulation of the market economy. A thorough examination of artifacts used by Native Americans, whether of Euro-American or Native origin, this volume provides a clear view of the realities of the economic and social interactions between Native groups and the expanding Euro-American population and the engagement of these Native groups in determining their own fate.

American Indians and the mass media / edited by Meta G. Carstarphen and John P. Sanchez.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012.  270pp.  Main Library  P94.5.I53 A64 2012 : Mention “American Indian,” and the first image that comes to most people’s minds is likely to be a figment of the American mass media: A war-bonneted chief. The Land O’ Lakes maiden. Most American Indians in the twenty-first century live in urban areas, so why do the mass media still rely on Indian imagery stuck in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries? How can more accurate views of contemporary Indian cultures replace such stereotypes? These and similar questions ground the essays collected in American Indians and the Mass Media, which explores Native experience and the mainstream media’s impact on American Indian histories, cultures, and communities....Chronicling milestones in the relationship between Indians and the media, some of the chapters employ a historical perspective, and others focus on contemporary practices and new technologies. All foreground American Indian perspectives missing in other books on mass communication. The historical studies examine treatment of Indians in America’s first newspaper, published in seventeenth-century Boston, and in early Cherokee newspapers; Life magazine’s depictions of Indians, including the famous photograph of Ira Hayes raising the flag at Iwo Jima; and the syndicated feature stories of Elmo Scott Watson. Among the chapters on more contemporary issues, one discusses campaigns to change offensive place-names and sports team mascots, and another looks at recent movies such as Smoke Signals and television programs that are gradually overturning the “movie Indian” stereotypes of the twentieth century....Particularly valuable are the essays highlighting authentic tribal voices in current and future media. Mark Trahant chronicles the formation of the Native American Journalists Association, perhaps the most important early Indian advocacy organization, which he helped found. As the contributions on new media point out, American Indians with access to a computer can tell their own stories—instantly to millions of people—making social networking and other Internet tools effective means for combating stereotypes....Including discussion questions for each essay and an extensive bibliography, American Indians and the Mass Media is a unique educational resource.

Ancient complexities : new perspectives in Precolumbian North America / edited by Susan M. Alt.  Salt Lake City : University of Utah Press, c2010.  236pp.  Main Library E77.9 .A49 2010 : Many archaeologists have long been frustrated with the traditional, reductionist representation of complexity. Yet, even after years of debate, there seem to be never ending disagreements over the complexity of places like Chaco Canyon, Cahokia, and Poverty Point. This matters, because there are political and scholarly implications to calling any place or people more or less complex. In North America especially, given historical biases and the mound-builder myth, archaeologists need to rethink complexity as they seek to explain the past....Based on a Society of American Archaeology symposium, Ancient Complexities offers a current overview of what is meant by cultural complexity and how archaeologists study the development of complex societies in North America. Taking a critical look at how accepted definitions of complexity have bounded our thinking about ancient societies, this volume presents new theoretical perspectives and states a case for the need for different definitions in order to move this discussion ahead....This collection by scholars of North American archaeology is a must read for anyone wishing to be abreast of the most current dialogue on complexity taking place in modern archaeology.

Ancient households of the Americas : conceptualizing what households do / edited by John G. Douglass and Nancy Gonlin.  Boulder : University Press of Colorado, c2012.  448pp.  Main Library E59.D9 A63 2012 : In Ancient Households of the Americas archaeologists investigate the fundamental role of household production in ancient, colonial, and contemporary households....Several different cultures-Iroquois, Coosa, Anasazi, Hohokam, San Agustín, Wankarani, Formative Gulf Coast Mexico, and Formative, Classic, Colonial, and contemporary Maya-are analyzed through the lens of household archaeology in concrete, data-driven case studies. The text is divided into three sections: Section I examines the spatial and social organization and context of household production; Section II looks at the role and results of households as primary producers; and Section III investigates the role of, and interplay among, households in their greater political and socioeconomic communities....In the past few decades, household archaeology has made substantial contributions to our understanding and explanation of the past through the documentation of the household as a social unit-whether small or large, rural or urban, commoner or elite. These case studies from a broad swath of the Americas make Ancient Households of the Americas extremely valuable for continuing the comparative interdisciplinary study of households.

Anetso, the Cherokee ball game : at the center of ceremony and identity / Michael J. Zogry.  Chapel Hill, N.C. : University of North Carolina Press, 2010.  318pp.  Main Library E99.C5 Z64 2010 : Anetso, a centuries-old Cherokee ball game still played today, is a vigorous, sometimes violent activity that rewards speed, strength, and agility. At the same time, it is the focus of several linked ritual activities. Is it a sport? Is it a religious ritual? Could it possibly be both? Why has it lasted so long, surviving through centuries of upheaval and change?

The art of Americanization at the Carlisle Indian School / Hayes Peter Mauro.  Albuquerque, N.M. : University of New Mexico Press, 2011.  178pp.  Main Library E97.6.C2 M28 2011 : The story of the Carlisle Indian School (and others like it) is now a well-known blot upon the pages of American history. Less well known are the stories behind the images used to convey its mission. Established by an 1879 congressional act, this paramilitary-style residential boarding school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, aimed to solve the "Indian question" by forcibly assimilating and Americanizing Native American children. A major part of this process was depicted by the "before and after" portrait. These images displayed individuals in their allegedly degenerate state before Americanization and then as productive, happy new citizens at its conclusion. Using these portraits as a springboard, Mauro (Queensborough Community College) provides a view into this little-known world of advertising and documentary art at the turn of the last century. In analyzing the visual imagery produced at the school, he considers both cultural contexts and themes specific to the US and technical aspects of the items produced. Set against these considerations are overtones of racism and prejudice easily identifiable in 2011, but mundane and accepted in 1901. Prolific and superbly crafted black-and-white images complement the author's narrative.

The assassination of Hole in the Day / Anton Treuer.  St. Paul, MN : Borealis Books, c2011  295pp.  Main Library E99.C6 H648 2011 : On June 27, 1868, Hole in the Day (Bagonegiizhig) the Younger left Crow Wing, Minnesota, for Washington, DC, to fight the planned removal of the Mississippi Ojibwe to a reservation at White Earth. Several miles from his home, the self-styled leader of all the Ojibwe was stopped by at least twelve Ojibwe men and fatally shot....Hole in the Day’s death was national news, and rumors of its cause were many: personal jealousy, retribution for his claiming to be head chief of the Ojibwe, retaliation for the attacks he fomented in 1862, or retribution for his attempts to keep mixed-blood Ojibwe off the White Earth Reservation. Still later, investigators found evidence of a more disturbing plot involving some of his closest colleagues: the business elite at Crow Wing....While most historians concentrate on the Ojibwe relationship with whites to explain this story, Anton Treuer focuses on interactions with other tribes, the role of Ojibwe culture and tradition, and interviews with more than fifty elders to further explain the events leading up to the death of Hole in the Day. The Assassination of Hole in the Day is not only the biography of a powerful leader but an extraordinarily insightful analysis of a pivotal time in the history of the Ojibwe people.

Becoming Indian : the struggle over Cherokee identity in the twenty-first century / Circe Sturm.  Santa Fe : School for Advanced Research Press, 2011 [c2010]  262pp.  Main Library E99.C5 S878 2011 : According to the US census, the Native American population grew by an astounding 349 percent between 1960 and 2000, a figure that is inexplicable unless it is reflective of what Sturm (anthropology, U. of Texas at Austin) calls "racial shifting," in which people who did not identify as Indian later come to reclaim their Indian identity (excluding obviously instrumentalist examples of racial appropriation). In this work, she carries out an ethnographic study of "new Indians," seeking their motivations for asserting Indian-ness in the changing cultural, political, and social values surrounding indigenous ancestry and identity.

Beyond the asterisk : understanding Native students in higher education / edited by Heather Shotton, Shelly Lowe, and Stephanie J. Waterman.  Sterling, Virginia : Stylus, 2013.  189pp.  Main Library E97 .B49 2013 : While the success of higher education and student affairs is predicated on understanding the students we serve, the reality is, where the Native American population is concerned, that this knowledge is generally lacking. This lack may be attributed to this population’s invisibility within the academy – it is often excluded from institutional data and reporting, and frequently noted as not statistically significant – and its relegation to what is referred to as the “American Indian research asterisk.”...The purpose of this book is to move beyond the asterisk in an effort to better understand Native students, challenge the status quo, and provide an informed base for leaders in student and academic affairs, and administrators concerned with the success of students on their campuses....The authors of this book share their understanding of Native epistemologies, culture, and social structures, offering student affairs professionals and institutions a richer array of options, resources, and culturally-relevant and inclusive models to better serve this population. ...The book begins by providing insights into Native student experiences, presenting the first-year experience from a Native perspective, illustrating the role of a Native living/learning community in student retention, and discussing the importance of incorporating culture into student programming for Native students as well as the role of Native fraternities and sororities.

Blackbird's song : Andrew J. Blackbird and the Odawa people / Theodore J. Karamanski. East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2012.  293pp.  Main Library E99.O6 B534 2012  Also available online : For much of U.S. history, the story of native people has been written by historians and anthropologists relying on the often biased accounts of European-American observers. Though we have become well acquainted with war chiefs like Pontiac and Crazy Horse, it has been at the expense of better knowing civic-minded intellectuals like Andrew J. Blackbird, who sought in 1887 to give a voice to his people through his landmark book History of the Ottawa and Chippewa People. Blackbird chronicled the numerous ways in which these Great Lakes people fought to retain their land and culture, first with military resistance and later by claiming the tools of citizenship. This stirring account reflects on the lived experience of the Odawa people and the work of one of their greatest advocates.

Bureau of Indian Affairs / Donald L. Fixico.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2012.  229pp.  Main Library E93 .F513 2012 : Fixico (history and American Indian studies, Arizona State U.) presents an historical overview of the Bureau of Indian Affairs spanning 200-plus years of relations between the US government and some 500 American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups. Coverage spans from early US-Indian relations in the late 1700s of treaty and trade negotiations to Indian removals and wars involving eastern and western Indian groups, that led to various policies including boarding schools, Indian health, a reform movement, land allotment, termination, relocation, self-determination, and government-to-government recognition of tribal sovereignty. Designed for high school students on up and general readers, the text also contains an introduction, chronology, biographies of key figures, selection of primary documents, glossary, and annotated bibliography. Fixico is a member of the Shawnee, Sac and Fax, Muscogee Creek, and Seminole tribes.  Part of the Landmarks of the American Mosaic series.

Cahokia : Ancient America's Great City on the Mississippi / Timothy R. Pauketat. New York, N.Y. : Viking, 2009.  3rd edition, 526 pp.  Main Library  E77 .N3517 2010 : Almost a thousand years ago, a Native American city flourished along the Mississippi River near what is now St. Louis. Cahokia was a thriving metropolis at its height, with a population of 20,000, a sprawling central plaza, and scores of spectacular earthen mounds. The city gave rise to a new culture that spread across the plains; yet by 1400 it had been abandoned, leaving only the giant mounds as monuments, and traces of its influence in tribes we know today. Here, anthropologist Timothy R. Pauketat reveals the story of the city and its people as uncovered by American archaeologists. Their excavations have revealed evidence of a powerful society, including complex celestial timepieces, the remains of feasts big enough to feed thousands, and disturbing signs of large-scale human sacrifice. Pauketat provides a comprehensive picture of what's been discovered about Cahokia, and how these findings have challenged our perceptions of Native Americans.

Captive! : the story of David Ogden and the Iroquois / Jack Harpster and Ken Stalter.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2010. 195pp. Main Library  E99.I7 H26 2010 : This book recounts the amazing life story of a 16-year-old American Revolutionary-era soldier, including his captivity, adoption, and eventual flight to freedom from the Iroquois Six-Nation Indian tribes. The story is retold with historical accuracy and an even-handed treatment of the conflicting interests of the loyalists, Iroquois, and Patriots.

The Catholic Calumet : Colonial Conversions in French and Indian North America / Tracy Neal Leavelle.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.  255pp.  Main Library F1030.7 .L43 2012 : In 1730 a delegation of Illinois Indians arrived in the French colonial capital of New Orleans. An Illinois leader presented two ceremonial pipes, or calumets, to the governor. One calumet represented the diplomatic alliance between the two men and the other symbolized their shared attachment to Catholicism. The priest who documented this exchange also reported with excitement how the Illinois recited prayers and sang hymns in their Native language, a display that astonished the residents of New Orleans. The "Catholic" calumet and the Native-language prayers and hymns were the product of long encounters between the Illinois and Jesuit missionaries, men who were themselves transformed by these sometimes intense spiritual experiences. The conversions of people, communities, and cultural practices that led to this dramatic episode all occurred in a rapidly evolving and always contested colonial context....In The Catholic Calumet, historian Tracy Neal Leavelle examines interactions between Jesuits and Algonquian-speaking peoples of the upper Great Lakes and Illinois country, including the Illinois and Ottawas, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Leavelle abandons singular definitions of conversion that depend on the idealized elevation of colonial subjects from "savages" to "Christians" for more dynamic concepts that explain the changes that all participants experienced. A series of thematic chapters on topics such as myth and historical memory, understandings of human nature, the creation of colonial landscapes, translation of religious texts into Native languages, and the influence of gender and generational differences demonstrates that these encounters resulted in the emergence of complicated and unstable cross-cultural religious practices that opened new spaces for cultural creativity and mutual adaptation.

Chief Loco : Apache peacemaker / Bud Shapard. Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010. 364pp.  Main Library E99.C68 L637 2010 : While the names Cochise and Geronimo are familiar to anyone with a casual knowledge of Western history, a mention of Chief Loco will draw blank stares. The only Apache chief who both made and kept the peace with the United States, Loco worked hard to protect his Chiricahua band safe from war and its hardships. Despite Loco's efforts, however, he and his people faced the same fate as that of the more famous Apache war chiefs and their bands--exile and imprisonment for decades in Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma. Based on extensive research and interviews with Loco's descendants, this engaging book tells the story of Loco's long tenure as a Chiracahua leader, and makes an important contribution to scholarship on the Apaches and Native American history.

Commerce by a frozen sea : Native Americans and the European fur trade / Ann M. Carlos and Frank D. Lewis.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.  260pp.  Main Library  E98.C7 C375 2010 : A cross-cultural study of a century of contact between North American native peoples and Europeans. During the eighteenth century, the natives of the Hudson Bay lowlands and their European trading partners were brought together by an increasingly popular trade in furs, destined for the hat and fur markets of Europe. Native Americans were the sole trappers of furs, which they traded to English and French merchants. The trade gave Native Americans access to new European technologies that were integrated into Indian lifeways. What emerges from this detailed exploration is a story of two equal partners involved in a mutually beneficial trade....Drawing on more than seventy years of trade records from the archives of the Hudson's Bay Company, economic historians Ann M. Carlos and Frank D. Lewis critique and confront many of the myths commonly held about the nature and impact of commercial trade. Extensively documented are the ways in which natives transformed the trading environment and determined the range of goods offered to them. Natives were effective bargainers who demanded practical items such as firearms, kettles, and blankets as well as luxuries like cloth, jewelry, and tobacco—goods similar to those purchased by Europeans. Surprisingly little alcohol was traded. Indeed, Commerce by a Frozen Sea shows that natives were industrious people who achieved a standard of living above that of most workers in Europe. Although they later fell behind, the eighteenth century was, for Native Americans, a golden age.

Contested territories : native Americans and non-natives in the lower Great Lakes, 1700-1850 / edited by Charles Beatty-Medina and Melissa Rinehart.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2012.  223pp.  Main Library E78.G7 C66 2012  (Also available online) : A remarkable multifaceted history, Contested Territories examines a region that played an essential role in America's post-revolutionary expansion—the Lower Great Lakes region, once known as the Northwest Territory. As French, English, and finally American settlers moved westward and intersected with Native American communities, the ethnogeography of the region changed drastically, necessitating interactions that were not always peaceful. Using ethnohistorical methodologies, the seven essays presented here explore rapidly changing cultural dynamics in the region and reconstruct in engaging detail the political organization, economy, diplomacy, subsistence methods, religion, and kinship practices in play. With a focus on resistance, changing worldviews, and early forms of self-determination among Native Americans, Contested Territories demonstrates the continuous interplay between actor and agency during an important era in American history

Conversations with remarkable Native Americans / edited by Joëlle Rostkowski.  Albany : State University of New York Press, c2012.  143pp. Main Library  E89 .C66 2012 : Entertaining and enlightening interviews with some of today's most important Native Americans.

Crafting history in the northern plains : a political economy of the Heart river region, 1400-1750 / Mark D. MitchellTucson : University of Arizona Press, c2013.  269pp.  Main Library E78.N75 M58 2013 : The histories of post-1500 American Indian and First Nations societies reflect a dynamic interplay of forces. Europeans introduced new technologies, new economic systems, and new social forms, but those novelties were appropriated, resisted, modified, or ignored according to indigenous meanings, relationships, and practices that originated long before Europeans came to the Americas. A comprehensive understanding of the changes colonialism wrought must therefore be rooted in trans-Columbian native histories that span the centuries before and after the advent of the colonists....In Crafting History in the Northern Plains Mark D. Mitchell illustrates the crucial role archaeological methods and archaeological data can play in producing trans-Columbian histories. Combining an in-depth analysis of the organization of stone tool and pottery production with ethnographic and historical data, Mitchell synthesizes the social and economic histories of the native communities located at the confluence of the Heart and Missouri rivers, home for more than five centuries to the Mandan people....Mitchell is the first researcher to examine the impact of Mandan history on the developing colonial economy of the Northern Plains. In Crafting History in the Northern Plains, he demonstrates the special importance of native history in the 1400s and 1500s to the course of European colonization.

Creek paths and federal roads : Indians, settlers, and slaves and the making of the American South / Angela Pulley Hudson.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2010.  252pp.  Main Library E99.C9 H83 2010 : In Creek Paths and Federal Roads, Angela Pulley Hudson offers a new understanding of the development of the American South by examining travel within and between southeastern Indian nations and the southern states, from the founding of the United States until the forced removal of southeastern Indians in the 1830s....During the early national period, Hudson explains, settlers and slaves made their way along Indian trading paths and federal post roads, deep into the heart of the Creek Indians' world. Hudson focuses particularly on the creation and mapping of boundaries between Creek Indian lands and the states that grew up around them; the development of roads, canals, and other internal improvements within these territories; and the ways that Indians, settlers, and slaves understood, contested, and collaborated on these boundaries and transit networks....While she chronicles the experiences of these travelers--Native, newcomer, free, and enslaved--who encountered one another on the roads of Creek country, Hudson also places indigenous perspectives squarely at the center of southern history, shedding new light on the contingent emergence of the American South.

Crooked paths to allotment : the fight over federal Indian policy after the Civil war / C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  228pp. Main Library  E98.L3 G46 2012   Also available online  : Standard narratives of Native American history view the nineteenth century in terms of steadily declining Indigenous sovereignty, from removal of southeastern tribes to the 1887 General Allotment Act. In Crooked Paths to Allotment, C. Joseph Genetin-Pilawa focuses on political moments when viable alternatives to federal assimilation policies arose. In these moments, reformers and their allies challenged coercive practices and offered visions for policies that might have allowed Indigenous nations to adapt at their own pace and on their own terms.

Daily life during the Indian Wars / Clarissa W. Confer.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2011. 223pp.  Main Library E81 .C59 2011 : Confer's (PhD, American history) textbook, appropriate for high school students or advanced middle-schoolers, offers an introduction to the long history of violence between Native Americans and European settlers. The text is broken down into large chunks of time and place, from the 1600's to the late 1800's. Beginning with discussion of the conflicts with early British settlers in New England and Virginia, following chapters discuss the West, and the northern and southern plains. An epilogue adds material on the immediate aftermath of Wounded Knee. Several photographs of Native Americans and their homes are included.

Decolonizing museums : representing native America in national and tribal museums / Amy Lonetree.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  Also available online.

Deconstructing the Cherokee nation : town, region, and nation among eighteenth-century Cherokees / Tyler Boulware.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, 2011.  234pp.  Main Library E99.C5 B744 2011 : This significant contribution to Cherokee studies examines the tribe’s life during the eighteenth century, up to the Removal. By revealing town loyalties and regional alliances, Tyler Boulware uncovers a persistent identification hierarchy among the colonial Cherokee....Boulware aims to fill the gap in Cherokee historical studies by addressing two significant aspects of Cherokee identity: town and region. Though other factors mattered, these were arguably the most recognizable markers by which Cherokee peoples structured group identity and influenced their interactions with outside groups during the colonial era....This volume focuses on the understudied importance of social and political ties that gradually connected villages and regions and slowly weakened the localism that dominated in earlier decades. It highlights the importance of borderland interactions to Cherokee political behavior and provides a nuanced investigation of the issue of Native American identity, bringing geographic relevance and distinctions to the topic.

Deep waters : the textual continuum in American Indian literature / Christopher B. Teuton.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2010.  245pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 T46 2010 : Weaving connections between indigenous modes of oral storytelling, visual depiction, and contemporary American Indian literature, Deep Waters demonstrates the continuing relationship between traditional and contemporary Native American systems of creative representation and signification. Christopher B. Teuton begins with a study of Mesoamerican writings, Dinâe sand paintings, and Haudenosaunee wampum belts. He proposes a theory of how and why indigenous oral and graphic means of recording thought are interdependent, their functions and purposes determined by social, political, and cultural contexts. The center of this book examines four key works of contemporary American Indian literature by N. Scott Momaday, Gerald Vizenor, Ray A. Young Bear, and Robert J. Conley. Through a textually grounded exploration of what Teuton calls the oral impulse, the graphic impulse, and the critical impulse, we see how and why various types of contemporary Native literary production are interrelated and draw upon long-standing indigenous methods of creative representation. Teuton breaks down the disabling binary of orality and literacy, offering readers a cogent, historically informed theory of indigenous textuality that allows for deeper readings of Native American cultural and literary expression.

Defending whose country? : indigenous soldiers in the Pacific war / Noah Riseman.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2012.

Dinéjí Na'nitin : Navajo traditional teachings and history / Robert S. McPherson.  Boulder : University Press of Colorado, c2012.  Also available online.

Disinherited generations : our struggle to reclaim treaty rights for First Nations women and their descendants / Nellie Carlson & Kathleen Steinhauer ; as told to Linda Goyette.  Edmonton : University of Alberta Press, c2013.  172pp.  Main Library E78 .C2 C367 2013 : This oral autobiography of two remarkable Cree women tells their life stories against a backdrop of government discrimination, First Nations activism, and the resurgence of First Nations communities. Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer, who helped to organize the Indian Rights for Indian Women movement in western Canada in the 1960s, fought the Canadian government’s interpretation of treaty and Aboriginal rights, the Indian Act, and the male power structure in their own communities in pursuit of equal rights for Aboriginal women and children. After decades of activism and court battles, First Nations women succeeded in changing these oppressive regulations, thus benefitting thousands of their descendants. Those interested in human rights, activism, history, and Native Studies will find that these personal stories, enriched by detailed notes and photographs, form a passionate record of an important, continuing struggle. “We made history. It was thought at one time that it could never be done, but we did it.” —Nellie Carlson “I made the snowballs, and Nellie threw them.” —Kathleen Steinhauer Nellie Carlson was born into the Saddle Lake Cree Nation and is a founder and long-time activist with Indian Rights for Indian Women. She lives in Edmonton. Kathleen Steinhauer (1932-2012) was born into the Saddle Lake Cree Nation and was a founder and long-time activist with Indian Rights for Indian Women. Linda Goyette is a writer, editor, and award-winning journalist. After working for Canadian daily newspapers for twenty years, she published seven books on oral history, contemporary storytelling, and human rights. She divides her time between Alberta and Ontario.

Dragoons in Apacheland : conquest and resistance in southern New Mexico, 1846-1861 / William S. Kiser.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, [2012]

Driven West : Andrew Jackson's trail of tears to the Civil War / A.J. Langguth.  New York : Simon & Schuster, c2010.  466pp.  Main Library E338 .L36 2010 : A narrative history of four turbulent decades of growth in America traces the contributions of Presidents Monroe, Jackson, Van Buren and Polk while covering such topics as the debates over Native American rights, Manifest Destiny expansion, and the events that led up to the Civil War....  USC professor of journalism Langguth maintains America's first civil war occurred during the 1830s when Andrew Jackson expelled Indian tribes from the Deep South. Recounting the events from 1825 through the Civil War (which forced the Cherokees to choose between North and South), he puts in context the expulsion of the Cherokees from the South and their tragic Trail of Tears. Langguth proceeds through chapters that each focus on one figure in the drama, from John Calhoun to Cherokee chief John Ross. By 1820, wars and draconian peace treaties had already eliminated many Indians from the South. Exhorted by Southern white leaders to move to Oklahoma territory, some complied, but many refused; some became Christian. The end came when Andrew Jackson overcame Northern opposition to the 1830 Indian Removal Act. The army ejected reluctant Indians and with little planning for the long trip, 25%–50% percent of the 50,000 deportees died of disease and starvation. Readers of this engrossing, profoundly depressing history may not consider the fight over Indian removal civil war, but few will doubt that it represents a bitter North–South conflict in which the bad guys won.

Featured Books, E-K

The eagle returns : the legal history of the Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians / Matthew Fletcher.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2012.  257pp.  Main Library, Faculty Collection (1 East), and Schaeffer School of Law Library  E78.M6 F57 2012 (Also available online)  : Fletcher (director, Indigenous Law and Policy Center, Michigan State U.) surveys the governmental, legal, and political history of the Grand Traverse Band of northwest lower Michigan, with an emphasis on the status of the tribe both as a treaty tribe and as the first tribe recognized by the Department of the Interior. The book begins with a review of the history of the Grand Traverse Band during treaty times, focusing on the 1836 Treaty of Washington and the 1855 Treaty of Detroit. The author then describes the dispossession of the Band's land base following the 1855 Treaty, the eventual federal recognition of the Band, and the Band's treaty rights fight. There is also material on the development of modern tribal law and justice systems and the Grand Traverse Band's gaming operations and related business enterprises.

Eating the landscape : American Indian stories of food, identity, and resilience / Enrique Salmón.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2012.  170pp.  Main Library E78.S7 S24 2012 : "Eating is not only a political act, it is also a cultural act that reaffirms one’s identity and worldview," Enrique Salmón writes in Eating the Landscape. Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O’odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara, the book is an illuminating journey through the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Salmón weaves his historical and cultural knowledge as a renowned indigenous ethnobotanist with stories American Indian farmers have shared with him to illustrate how traditional indigenous foodways—from the cultivation of crops to the preparation of meals—are rooted in a time-honored understanding of environmental stewardship....In this fascinating personal narrative, Salmón focuses on an array of indigenous farmers who uphold traditional agricultural practices in the face of modern changes to food systems such as extensive industrialization and the genetic modification of food crops. Despite the vast cultural and geographic diversity of the region he explores, Salmón reveals common themes: the importance of participation in a reciprocal relationship with the land, the connection between each group’s cultural identity and their ecosystems, and the indispensible correlation of land consciousness and food consciousness. Salmón shows that these collective philosophies provide the foundation for indigenous resilience as the farmers contend with global climate change and other disruptions to long-established foodways. This resilience, along with the rich stores of traditional ecological knowledge maintained by indigenous agriculturalists, Salmón explains, may be the key to sustaining food sources for humans in years to come....As many of us begin to question the origins and collateral costs of the food we consume, Salmón’s call for a return to more traditional food practices in this wide-ranging and insightful book is especially timely. Eating the Landscape is an essential resource for ethnobotanists, food sovereignty proponents, and advocates of the local food and slow food movements.

The edge of the woods : Iroquoia, 1534-1701 / Jon Parmenter.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, 2010.  474pp.  Main Library E99.I7 P26 2010 : Drawing on archival and published documents in several languages, archaeological data, and Iroquois oral traditions, THE EDGE OF THE WOODS explores the ways in which spatial mobility represented the geographic expression of Iroquois social, political, and economic priorities. By reconstructing the late precolonial Iroquois settlement landscape and the paths of human mobility that constructed and sustained it, Jon Parmenter challenges the persistent association between Iroquois locality and Iroquois culture, and more fully maps the extended terrain of physical presence and social activity that Iroquois people inhabited. Studying patterns of movement through and between the multiple localities in Iroquois space, the book offers a new understanding of Iroquois peoplehood during this period. According to Parmenter, Iroquois identities adapted, and even strengthened, as the very shape of Iroquois homelands changed dramatically during the seventeenth century. B/W illustrations, 7x10, maps, notes, bibliography, index.

The erotics of sovereignty : queer native writing in the era of self-determination / Mark Rifkin.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2012.  337pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 R54 2012 : In 1970 the Nixon administration inaugurated a new era in federal Indian policy. No more would the U.S. government seek to deny and displace Native peoples or dismantle Native governments; from now on federal policy would promote “the Indian’s sense of autonomy without threatening his sense of community.” ... In The Erotics of Sovereignty, Mark Rifkin offers a telling perspective on what such a policy of self-determination has meant and looks at how contemporary queer Native writers use representations of sensation to challenge official U.S. accounts of Native identity. Rifkin focuses on four Native writers—Qwo-Li Driskill (Cherokee), Deborah Miranda (Esselen), Greg Sarris (Graton Rachería), and Chrystos (Menominee)—approaching their fiction and poetry as forms of political theory....Rifkin shows how the work of these queer or two-spirit Native writers affirms the significance of the erotic as an exercise of individual and community sovereignty. In this way, we come to see how their work contests the homophobic, sexist, and exclusivist policies and attitudes of tribal communities as well as those of the nation-state.

Engaged resistance : American Indian art, literature, and film from Alcatraz to the NMAI / Dean Rader.  Austin : University of Texas Press, 2011.   253pp.  Main Library E98.A73 R23 2011 : From Sherman Alexie's films to the poetry and fiction of Louise Erdrich and Leslie Marmon Silko to the paintings of Jaune Quick-To-See Smith and the sculpture of Edgar Heap of Birds, Native American movies, literature, and art have become increasingly influential, garnering critical praise and enjoying mainstream popularity. Recognizing that the time has come for a critical assessment of this exceptional artistic output and its significance to American Indian and American issues, Dean Rader offers the first interdisciplinary examination of how American Indian artists, filmmakers, and writers tell their own stories....Beginning with rarely seen photographs, documents, and paintings from the Alcatraz Occupation in 1969 and closing with an innovative reading of the National Museum of the American Indian, Rader initiates a conversation about how Native Americans have turned to artistic expression as a means of articulating cultural sovereignty, autonomy, and survival. Focusing on figures such as author/director Sherman Alexie (Flight, Face, and Smoke Signals), artist Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, director Chris Eyre (Skins), author Louise Erdrich (Jacklight, The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse), sculptor Edgar Heap of Birds, novelist Leslie Marmon Silko, sculptor Allen Houser, filmmaker and actress Valerie Red Horse, and other writers including Joy Harjo, LeAnne Howe, and David Treuer, Rader shows how these artists use aesthetic expression as a means of both engagement with and resistance to the dominant U.S. culture. Raising a constellation of new questions about Native cultural production, Rader greatly increases our understanding of what aesthetic modes of resistance can accomplish that legal or political actions cannot, as well as why Native peoples are turning to creative forms of resistance to assert deeply held ethical values.

Everything you wanted to know about Indians but were afraid to ask / Anton Treuer.  Saint Paul, MN : Borealis Books, c2012.  190pp.  Main Library E77 .T795 2012 : “I had a profoundly well-educated Princetonian ask me, ‘Where is your tomahawk?’ I had a beautiful woman approach me in the college gymnasium and exclaim, ‘You have the most beautiful red skin.’ I took a friend to see Dances with Wolves and was told, ‘Your people have a beautiful culture.’ . . . I made many lifelong friends at college, and they supported but also challenged me with questions like, ‘Why should Indians have reservations?’ ” ... What have you always wanted to know about Indians? Do you think you should already know the answers—or suspect that your questions may be offensive? In matterof-fact responses to over 120 questions, both thoughtful and outrageous, modern and historical, Ojibwe scholar and cultural preservationist Anton Treuer gives a frank, funny, and sometimes personal tour of what’s up with Indians, anyway.

• What is the real story of Thanksgiving?
• Why are tribal languages important?
• What do you think of that incident where people died in a sweat lodge?

White/Indian relations are often characterized by guilt and anger. Everything You Wanted to Know about Indians But Were Afraid to Ask cuts through the emotion and builds a foundation for true understanding and positive action.

Federal fathers and mothers : the United States Indian Service, 1869-1933 / Cathleen D. Cahill.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.  368pp.  Main Library E93 .C27 2011 : Established in 1824, the United States Indian Service, now known as the Bureau of Indian Affairs, was the agency responsible for carrying out U.S. treaty and trust obligations to American Indians, but it also sought to "civilize" and assimilate them. In Federal Fathers and Mothers, Cathleen Cahill offers the first in-depth social history of the agency during the height of its assimilation efforts in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries....Making extensive and original use of federal personnel files and other archival materials, Cahill examines how assimilation practices were developed and enacted by an unusually diverse group of women and men, whites and Indians, married couples and single people. Cahill argues that the Indian Service pursued a strategy of intimate colonialism, using employees as surrogate parents and model families in order to shift Native Americans' allegiances from tribal kinship networks to Euro-American familial structures and, ultimately, the U.S. government. In seeking to remove Indians from federal wardship, the government experimented with new forms of maternalist social provision, which later influenced U.S. colonialism overseas. Cahill also reveals how the government's hiring practices unexpectedly allowed federal personnel on the ground to crucially influence policies devised in Washington, especially when Native employees used their positions to defend their families and communities.

Field man : life as a desert archaeologist / Julian D. Hayden ; edited by Bill Broyles and Diane E. Boyer.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.  280pp.  Main Library E78.S7 H377 2011 : Field Man is the captivating memoir of renowned southwestern archaeologist Julian Dodge Hayden, a man who held no professional degree or faculty position but who camped and argued with a who’s who of the discipline, including Emil Haury, Malcolm Rogers, Paul Ezell, and Norman Tindale. This is the personal story of a blue-collar scholar who bucked the conventional thinking on the antiquity of man in the New World, who brought a formidable pragmatism and “hand sense” to the identification of stone tools, and who is remembered as the leading authority on the prehistory of the Sierra Pinacate in northwestern Mexico....But Field Man is also an evocative recollection of a bygone time and place, a time when archaeological trips to the Southwest were “expeditions,” when a man might run a Civilian Conservation Corps crew by day and study the artifacts of ancient peoples by night, when one could honeymoon by a still-full Gila River, and when a Model T pickup needed extra transmissions to tackle the back roads of Arizona....To say that Julian Hayden led an eventful life would be an understatement. He accompanied his father, a Harvard-trained archaeologist, on influential excavations, became a crew chief in his own right, taught himself silversmithing, married a “city girl,” helped build the Yuma Air Field, worked as a civilian safety officer, and was a friend and mentor to countless students. He also crossed paths with leading figures in other fields. Barry Goldwater and even Frank Lloyd Wright turn up in this wide-ranging narrative of a “desert rat” who was at once a throwback and—as he only half-jokingly suggests—ahead of his time.

The first frontier : the forgotten history of struggle, savagery, and endurance in early America / Scott Weidensaul.  Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.  474pp.  Main Library F106 .W45 2012 : Frontier: the word carries the inevitable scent of the West. But before Custer or Lewis and Clark, before the first Conestoga wagons rumbled across the Plains, it was the East that marked the frontier—the boundary between complex Native cultures and the first colonizing Europeans....Here is the older, wilder, darker history of a time when the land between the Atlantic and the Appalachians was contested ground—when radically different societies adopted and adapted the ways of the other, while struggling for control of what all considered to be their land....The First Frontier traces two and a half centuries of history through poignant, mostly unheralded personal stories—like that of a Harvard-educated Indian caught up in seventeenth-century civil warfare, a mixed-blood interpreter trying to straddle his white and Native heritage, and a Puritan woman wielding a scalping knife whose bloody deeds still resonate uneasily today. It is the first book in years to paint a sweeping picture of the Eastern frontier, combining vivid storytelling with the latest research to bring to life modern America’s tumultuous, uncertain beginnings.

Firsting and lasting : writing Indians out of existence in New England / Jean M. O'Brien. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2010.  269pp. Main Library E78.N5 O35 2010 :  Across nineteenth-century New England, antiquarians and community leaders wrote hundreds of local histories about the founding and growth of their cities and towns. Ranging from pamphlets to multivolume treatments, these narratives shared a preoccupation with establishing the region as the cradle of an Anglo-Saxon nation and the center of a modern American culture. They also insisted, often in mournful tones, that New England’s original inhabitants, the Indians, had become extinct, even though many Indians still lived in the very towns being chronicled....In Firsting and Lasting, Jean M. O’Brien argues that local histories became a primary means by which European Americans asserted their own modernity while denying it to Indian peoples. Erasing and then memorializing Indian peoples also served a more pragmatic colonial goal: refuting Indian claims to land and rights. Drawing on more than six hundred local histories from Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island written between 1820 and 1880, as well as censuses, monuments, and accounts of historical pageants and commemorations, O’Brien explores how these narratives inculcated the myth of Indian extinction, a myth that has stubbornly remained in the American consciousness.In order to convince themselves that the Indians had vanished despite their continued presence, O’Brien finds that local historians and their readers embraced notions of racial purity rooted in the century’s scientific racism and saw living Indians as “mixed” and therefore no longer truly Indian. Adaptation to modern life on the part of Indian peoples was used as further evidence of their demise. Indians did not—and have not—accepted this effacement, and O’Brien details how Indians have resisted their erasure through narratives of their own. These debates and the rich and surprising history uncovered in O’Brien’s work continue to have a profound influence on discourses about race and indigenous rights.

For indigenous minds only : a decolonization handbook / edited by Waziyatawin and Michael Yellow Bird.   Santa Fe : School of American Research Press, c2012.  273pp. Main Library E98.E85 F68 2012 : In this follow-up to their 2005 book, For Indigenous Eyes Only, Dakota activist and teacher Waziyatawin and social work educator Yellow Bird (Humboldt State University) write from the understanding that decolonization must begin in the mind. Contributors are Native American and other indigenous academics, activists, tribal leaders, and social work professionals. Writing in a style accessible to all, they recommend ramping up indigenous resistance in the face of the coming collapse of industrial civilization and global climate change, offering advice on preparing to return to the land. Of special interest is a chapter on survival strategies for tribal prisoners, written by a Lakota man incarcerated since 1983. Also of interest are instructions for using mindfulness practices to delete the neural networks of colonialism, and guidelines for using the principles of just war to make decisions about joining the US military. The book includes many discussion prompts and activities for students, counselors, youth, youth workers, activists, and teachers, as well as many lists of books, websites, and  documentaries.

The forced removal of American Indians from the northeast : a history of territorial cessions and relocations, 1620-1854 / David W. Miller.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2011.  215pp.  Main Library E98.R4 M55 2011 : Native American tribes were forced to give up 412,000 square miles of territory in the American Northeast, north of the Ohio River, between the first contact and the enforcement of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Miller, an attorney and judge who has written other books on American history, offers a detailed narrative with quotes from primary sources woven throughout, focusing on the actual words and actions of individuals, communities, and organizations as revealed by letters and journals, government documents, and other archival sources. Documents shed light on government policies, the attitudes of influential whites, and the experiences of Native Americans.

From Chicaza to Chickasaw : the European invasion and the transformation of the Mississippian world, 1540-1715 / Robbie Ethridge.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010. 344p.  Main Library E99.C55 E84 2010 : In this sweeping regional history, anthropologist Robbie Ethridge traces the metamorphosis of the Native South from first contact in 1540 by Hernando de Soto to the dawn of the eighteenth century, when indigenous people no longer lived in a purely Indian world but rather on the edge of an expanding European empire and in a new social landscape that included a large population of Europeans and Africans. Despite the fact that thousands of Indians died or were enslaved and virtually all Native polities were radically altered in these years, the collapse of this complex Mississippian world did not extinguish the Native peoples of the South but rather transformed them....Using a new interpretive framework that Ethridge calls the "Mississppian shatter zone" to explicate these tumultuous times, From Cbicaza to Chickasaw examines the European invasion and the collapse of the precontact Mississippian world and the restructuring of discrete chiefdoms into coalescent Native societies in a colonial world. Within this larger regional context, she closely follows the story of one group---the Chickasaws---throughout this period. With skillfully synthesized archaeological and documentary evidence, Ethridge illuminates the Native South in its earliest colonial context and sheds new light on the profound upheaval and cultural transformation experienced by the region's first peoples.

The Frontier Newspapers and the Coverage of the Plains Indian Wars / Hugh J. Reilly.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2010.  162pp.  Main Library E83.866 .R377 2010 : Reilly fleshes out the broad strokes of interaction between natives and settlers in the middle of North America from the 1860s to the 1890s by drawing on the articles and opinions in the local newspapers where the wars were being fought. Among the episodes he documents are the Great Sioux uprising in August- December 1862, the Sand Creek Massacre November 1864, the Little Big Horn campaign January-July 1876, the flight of the Nez Perce March-October 1877, and the Ghost Dance and Wounded Knee 1890-91

Fur, fortune, and empire : the epic history of the fur trade in America / Eric Jay Dolin.  New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2010.  442pp.  Main Library E46 .D65 2010 : Beginning his epic history in the early 1600s, Eric Jay Dolin traces the dramatic rise and fall of the American fur industry, from the first Dutch encounters with the Indians to the rise of the conservation movement in the late nineteenth century. Dolin shows how the fur trade, driven by the demands of fashion, sparked controversy, fostered economic competition, and fueled wars among the European powers, as North America became a battleground for colonization and imperial aspirations. The trade in beaver, buffalo, sea otter, and other animal skins spurred the exploration and the settlement of the vast American continent, while it alternately enriched and gravely damaged the lives of America's native peoples. Populated by a larger-than-life cast--including Dutch governor Peter Stuyvesant; President Thomas Jefferson; America's first multimillionaire, John Jacob Astor; and mountain man Kit Carson--Fur, Fortune, and Empire is the most comprehensive and compelling history of the American fur trade ever written.

Hand talk : sign language among American Indian Nations / Jeffrey E. Davis.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  244pp. Main Library   E98.S5 D38 2010 : "American Indian nations of the Great Plains and cultural groups bordering this geographic area spoke so many different languages that verbal communication between them was difficult. As extensive trade networks developed and political alliances became necessary, an elegant language of the hands developed that cut across spoken language barriers. Though now endangered, this sign language continues to serve a vital role in traditional storytelling, rituals, legends, prayers, conversational narratives, andas a primary language of American Indians who are deaf. This volume contains the most current descriptions of all levels of the language from phonology to discourse, as well as comparisons with other sign languages. This is the first work of its kind to be produced in more than a century, and is intended for students of sign language as well as those wishing to learn more about American Indian languages and cultures"

Hippies, Indians, and the Fight for Red Power / Sherry L. Smith.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  265pp.  Main Library   E98.T77 S57 2012 : Through much of the 20th century, federal policy toward Indians sought to extinguish all remnants of native life and culture. That policy was dramatically confronted in the late 1960s when a loose coalition of hippies, civil rights advocates, Black Panthers, unions, Mexican-Americans, Quakers and other Christians, celebrities, and others joined with Red Power activists to fight for Indian rights....In Hippies, Indians and the Fight for Red Power, Sherry Smith offers the first full account of this remarkable story. Hippies were among the first non-Indians of the post-World War II generation to seek contact with Native Americans. The counterculture saw Indians as genuine holdouts against conformity, inherently spiritual, ecological, tribal, communal-the original "long hairs." Searching for authenticity while trying to achieve social and political justice for minorities, progressives of various stripes and colors were soon drawn to the Indian cause. Black Panthers took part in Pacific Northwest fish-ins. Corky Gonzales' Mexican American Crusade for Justice provided supplies and support for the Wounded Knee occupation. Actor Marlon Brando and comedian Dick Gregory spoke about the problems Native Americans faced. For their part, Indians understood they could not achieve political change without help. Non-Indians had to be educated and enlisted. Smith shows how Indians found, among this hodge-podge of dissatisfied Americans, willing recruits to their campaign for recognition of treaty rights; realization of tribal power, sovereignty, and self-determination; and protection of reservations as cultural homelands. The coalition was ephemeral but significant, leading to political reforms that strengthened Indian sovereignty....Thoroughly researched and vividly written, this book not only illuminates this transformative historical moment but contributes greatly to our understanding about social movements.

Holding our world together : Ojibwe women and the survival of community / Brenda J. Child.  New York : Viking, 2012.  209pp.  Main Library   E99.C6 C48 2012 : Too often ignored or underemphasized in favor of their male warrior counterparts, Native American women have played a more central role in guiding their nations than has ever been understood. Many Native communities were, in fact, organized around women's labor, the sanctity of mothers, and the wisdom of female elders. In this well-researched and deeply felt account of the Ojibwe of Lake Superior and the Mississippi River, Brenda J. Child details the ways in which women have shaped Native American life from the days of early trade with Europeans through the reservation era and beyond....The latest volume in the Penguin Library of American Indian History, Holding Our World Together illuminates the lives of women such as Madeleine Cadotte, who became a powerful mediator between her people and European fur traders, and Gertrude Buckanaga, whose postwar community activism in Minneapolis helped bring many Indian families out of poverty. Drawing on these stories and others, Child offers a powerful tribute to the many courageous women who sustained Native communities through the darkest challenges of the last three centuries.

The house on Diamond Hill : a Cherokee plantation story / Tiya Miles.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.  315pp.  E99.C5
M5325 2010
 : A James Vann, a Cherokee and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. Tiya Miles tells the story of this plantations founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. Indeed, this is the first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the Diamond Hill plantation, a cosmopolitan hub of activity where more than one hundred slaves of African descent lived and labored, contributing significandy to the Vann family's famed wealth....This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries---from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book paints rich portraits of the women of these various communities, including Peggy Scott Vann, mistress of Diamond Hill; Pleasant, an enslaved black woman owned by the Moravian Church; and Anna Rosina Gambold, a Moravian missionary diarist. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier of present-day Georgia.

The Huron-Wendat feast of the dead : Indian-European encounters in early North America / Erik R. Seeman.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011.  163pp.  Main Library E99.H9 S44 2011 : "Two thousand Wendat (Huron) Indians stood on the edge of an enormous burial pit... they held in their arms the bones of roughly seven hundred deceased friends and family members. The Wendats had lovingly scraped and cleaned the bones of the corpses that had decomposed on the scaffolds. They awaited only the signal from the master of the ritual to place the bones in the pit. This was the great Feast of the Dead."...Witnesses to these Wendat burial rituals were European colonists, French Jesuit missionaries in particular. Rather than being horrified by these unfamiliar native practices, Europeans recognized the parallels between them and their own understanding of death and human remains. Both groups believed that deceased souls traveled to the afterlife; both believed that elaborate mortuary rituals ensured the safe transit of the soul to the supernatural realm; and both believed in the power of human bones....Appreciating each other's funerary practices allowed the Wendats and French colonists to find common ground where there seemingly would be none. Erik R. Seeman analyzes these encounters, using the Feast of the Dead as a metaphor for broader Indian-European relations in North America. His compelling narrative gives undergraduate students of early America and the Atlantic World a revealing glimpse into this fascinating—and surprising—meeting of cultures.

In the courts of the conqueror : the 10 worst Indian law cases ever decided / Walter R. Echo-Hawk.  Golden, Colo. : Fulcrum Pub., c2010.  560pp.  MSU Schaeffer Law Library KF8204 .E23 2010 : The fate of Native Americans has been dependent in large part upon the recognition and enforcement of their legal, political, property, and cultural rights as indigenous peoples by American courts. Most people think that the goal of the judiciary, and especially the US Supreme Court, is to achieve universal notions of truth and justice. In this in-depth examination, however, Walter Echo-Hawk reveals the troubling fact that American law has rendered legal the destruction of Native Americans and their culture....Echo-Hawk analyzes ten cases that embody or expose the roots of injustice and highlight the use of nefarious legal doctrines. He delves into the dark side of the courts, calling for a paradigm shift in American legal thinking. Each case study includes historical, contemporary, and political context from a Native American perspective, and the case’s legacy on Native America. In the Courts of the Conqueror is a comprehensive history of Indian Country from a new and unique viewpoint. It is a vital contribution to American history.

The inconvenient Indian : a curious account of native people in North America / Thomas King.  [Toronto] : Doubleday Canada, c2012.  288pp.  Main Library E77 .K566 2012 : The Inconvenient Indian is at once a "history" and the complete subversion of a history -- in short, a critical and personal meditation that the remarkable Thomas King has conducted over the past 50 years about what it means to be "Indian" in North America. Rich with dark and light, pain and magic, this book distills the insights gleaned from that meditation, weaving the curiously circular tale of the relationship between non-Natives and Natives in the centuries since the two first encountered each other. In the process, King refashions old stories about historical events and figures, takes a sideways look at film and pop culture, relates his own complex experiences with activism, and articulates a deep and revolutionary understanding of the cumulative effects of ever-shifting laws and treaties on Native peoples and lands. This is a book both timeless and timely, burnished with anger but tempered by wit, and ultimately a hard-won offering of hope -- a sometimes inconvenient, but nonetheless indispensable account for all of us, Indian and non-Indian alike, seeking to understand how we might tell a new story for the future..

Indian affairs and the administrative state in the nineteenth century / Stephen J. Rockwell.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  362pp.  Main Library E93 .R63 2010 : "The framers of the Constitution and the generations that followed built a powerful and intrusive national administrative state in the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The romantic myth of an individualized, pioneering expansion across an open West obscures nationally coordinated administrative and regulatory activity in Indian affairs, land policy, trade policy, infrastructure development, and a host of other issue areas related to expansion. Stephen J. Rockwell offers a careful look at the administration of Indian affairs and its relation to other national policies managing and shaping national expansion westward. Throughout the nineteenth century, Indian affairs were at the center of concerns about national politics, the national economy, andnational social issues. Rockwell describes how a vibrant and complicated national administrative state operated from the earliest days of the republic, long before the Progressive era and the New Deal."

The Indian great awakening : religion and the shaping of native cultures in early America / Linford D. Fisher.  New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  296pp. Main Library   E78.N5 F56 2012The First Great Awakening was a time of heightened religious activity in the colonial New England. Among those whom the English settlers tried to convert to Christianity were the region's native peoples. In this book, Linford Fisher tells the gripping story of American Indians' attempts to wrestle with the ongoing realities of colonialism between the 1670s and 1820. In particular, he looks at how some members of previously unevangelized Indian communities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, western Massachusetts, and Long Island adopted Christian practices, often joining local Congregational churches and receiving baptism. Far from passively sliding into the cultural and physical landscape after King Philip's War, he argues, Native individuals and communities actively tapped into transatlantic structures of power to protect their land rights, welcomed educational opportunities for their children, and joined local white churches. Religion repeatedly stood at the center of these points of cultural engagement, often in hotly contested ways. Although these Native groups had successfully resisted evangelization in the seventeenth century, by the eighteenth century they showed an increasing interest in education and religion. Their sporadic participation in the First Great Awakening marked a continuation of prior forms of cultural engagement. More surprisingly, however, in the decades after the Awakening, Native individuals and sub-groups asserted their religious and cultural autonomy to even greater degrees by leaving English churches and forming their own Indian Separate churches. In the realm of education, too, Natives increasingly took control, preferring local reservation schools and demanding Indian teachers whenever possible. In the 1780s, two small groups of Christian Indians moved to New York and founded new Christian Indian settlements. But the majority of New England Natives-even those who affiliated with Christianity-chose to remain in New England, continuing to assert their own autonomous existence through leasing land, farming, and working on and off the reservations. ...While Indian involvement in the Great Awakening has often been seen as total and complete conversion, Fisher's analysis of church records, court documents, and correspondence reveals a more complex reality. Placing the Awakening in context of land loss and the ongoing struggle for cultural autonomy in the eighteenth century casts it as another step in the ongoing, tentative engagement of native peoples with Christian ideas and institutions in the colonial world. Charting this untold story of the Great Awakening and the resultant rise of an Indian Separatism and its effects on Indian cultures as a whole, this gracefully written book challenges long-held notions about religion and Native-Anglo-American interaction

Indian voices : listening to Native Americans / Alison Owings.  New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2011.  363pp. Main Library   E98.E85 O85 2011 (Also available online) : In Indian Voices Alison Owings takes readers on a fresh journey across America, east to west, north to south, and around again. Owings's most recent oral history--engagingly written in a style that entertains and informs--documents what Native Americans say about themselves, their daily lives, and the world around them....Young and old from many tribal nations speak with candor, insight, and (unknown to many non-Natives) humor about what it is like to be a Native American in the twenty-first century. Through intimate interviews many also express their thoughts about the sometimes staggeringly ignorant, if often well-meaning, non-Natives they encounter--some who do not realize Native Americans still exist, much less that they speak English, have cell phones, use the Internet, and might attend powwows and power lunches....Indian Voices, an inspiring and important contribution to the literature about the original Americans, will make every reader rethink the past--and present--of the United States.

Indians and British outposts in eighteenth-century America / Daniel Ingram.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.  257pp. Main Library  E98.F39 I54 2012 : This fascinating look at the cultural and military importance of British forts in the colonial era explains how these forts served as communities in Indian country more than as bastions of British imperial power. Their security depended on maintaining good relations with the local Native Americans, who incorporated the forts into their economic and social life as well as into their strategies....Daniel Ingram uses official British records, traveler accounts, archaeological findings, and ethnographic information to reveal native contributions to the forts’ stories. Conducting in-depth research at five different forts, he looked for features that seemed to arise from Native American culture rather than British imperial culture. His fresh perspective reveals that British fort culture was heavily influenced, and in some cases guided, by the very people these outposts of empire were meant to impress and subdue....In this volume, Ingram recaptures the significance of small-scale encounters as vital features of the colonial American story, without arguing their importance in larger imperial frameworks. He specifically seeks to reorient the meaning of British military and provincial backcountry forts away from their customary roles as harbingers of European imperial domination.

Indiantown : an Ojibwe village becomes a farm community / by Roselynn EdererSaginaw, Mich. : Thomastown Pub. Co., c2011280pp.  E99.C6 E34 2011 : A compilation of oral histories, property deeds, genealogy records, newspaper accounts, other records and photos that tell the history of this Buena Vista Township farming community that emerged around the banks of the Cheboyganing Creek.  The land surrounding the creek was first settled by the Chippewa Indians when the land was granted to them by the U.S. Government in the 1850s. When their land was sold in the 1870s, German Catholic immigrants who were working in the Carrollton sawmills bought and cleared the land for farming. The community was then called Indiantown and became a part of the “Heartland of America.” Its residents were an important part of Saginaw’s past history and played a significant role in developing Michigan’s agricultural industry.

Indigenous dance and dancing Indian : contested representation in the global era / Matthew Krystal.  Boulder, Colo. : University of Press of Colorado, c2012.  315pp.  Main Library E98.D2 K79 2012 : Focusing on the enactment of identity in dance, Indigenous Dance and Dancing Indian is a cross-cultural, cross-ethnic, and cross-national comparison of indigenous dance practices....Considering four genres of dance in which indigenous people are represented--K'iche Maya traditional dance, powwow, folkloric dance, and dancing sports mascots--the book addresses both the ideational and behavioral dimensions of identity. Each dance is examined as a unique cultural expression in individual chapters, and then all are compared in the conclusion, where striking parallels and important divergences are revealed. Ultimately, Krystal describes how dancers and audiences work to construct and consume satisfying and meaningful identities through dance by either challenging social inequality or reinforcing the present social order....Detailed ethnographic work, thorough case studies, and an insightful narrative voice make Indigenous Dance and Dancing Indian a substantial addition to scholarly literature on dance in the Americas. It will be of interest to scholars of Native American studies, social sciences, and performing arts.

Indigenous North American drama : a multivocal history / edited by Birgit Däwes.  Albany : SUNY Press, c2013.  234pp. Main Library PS153.I52 I56 2013 : Traces the historical dimensions of Native North American drama using a critical perspective.

Indigenous peoples of North America : a concise anthropological overview / Robert J. Muckle.  Toronto ; Tonawanda, N.Y. : University of Toronto Press, c2012.  198pp.  Main Library E77 .M89 2012 : Most books dealing with North American Indigenous peoples are exhaustive in coverage. They provide in-depth discussion of various culture areas which, while valuable, sometimes means that the big picture context is lost. This book offers a corrective to that trend by providing a concise, thematic overview of the key issues facing Indigenous peoples in North America, from prehistory to the present. It integrates a culture area analysis within a thematic approach, covering archaeology, traditional lifeways, the colonial era, and contemporary Indigenous culture. Muckle also explores the history of the relationship between Indigenous peoples and anthropologists with rigor and honesty. The result is a remarkably comprehensive book that provides a strong grounding for understanding Indigenous cultures in North America. 

An infinity of nations : how the native New World shaped early North America / Michael Witgen. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012. 450pp.  Main Library E91 .W58 2012 : Explores the formation and development of a Native New World in North America. Until the middle of the nineteenth century, indigenous peoples controlled the vast majority of the continent while European colonies of the Atlantic World were largely confined to the eastern seaboard. To be sure, Native North America experienced far-reaching and radical change following contact with the peoples, things, and ideas that flowed inland following the creation of European colonies on North American soil. Most of the continent's indigenous peoples, however, were not conquered, assimilated, or even socially incorporated into the settlements and political regimes of this Atlantic New World. Instead, Native peoples forged a New World of their own. This history, the evolution of a distinctly Native New World, is a foundational story that remains largely untold in histories of early America....Through imaginative use of both Native language and European documents, historian Michael Witgen recreates the world of the indigenous peoples who ruled the western interior of North America. The Anishinaabe and Dakota peoples of the Great Lakes and Northern Great Plains dominated the politics and political economy of these interconnected regions, which were pivotal to the fur trade and the emergent world economy. Moving between cycles of alliance and competition, and between peace and violence, the Anishinaabeg and Dakota carved out a place for Native peoples in modern North America, ensuring not only that they would survive as independent and distinct Native peoples but also that they would be a part of the new community of nations who made the New World.

The invasion of Indian country in the twentieth century : American capitalism and tribal natural resources / Donald L. Fixico.  Boulder : University Press of Colorado, c2012.  2nd edition, 278pp.  Main Library E93 .F515 2012 : The Invasion of Indian Country in the Twentieth Century, Second Edition is updated through the first decade of the twenty-first century and contains a new chapter challenging Americans--Indian and non-Indian--to begin healing the earth. This analysis of the struggle to protect not only natural resources but also a way of life serves as an indispensable tool for students or anyone interested in Native American history and current government policy with regard to Indian lands or the environment.

Iroquois Art, Power, and History / Neal B. Keating.  Norman, Okla. : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012.  348pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection  E99.I7 K33 2P12 : In this richly illustrated book, Neal B. Keating explores Iroquois visual expression through more than five thousand years, from its emergence in ancient North America into the early twenty-first century.  Drawing on extensive archival research and fieldwork with Iroquois artists and communities, Keating foregrounds the voices and visions of Iroquois peoples, revealing how they have continuously used visual expression to adapt creatively to shifting political and economic environments....Iroquois, or Haudenosaunee, peoples have long been the subjects of Western study. From the seventeenth to the nineteenth century, European and Euro-American writers classified Iroquois works not as art but as culturally lower forms of expression. During the twentieth century, Western critics commonly rejected contemporary Native art both as art and as an “inauthentic” expression of Indianness.  Keating exposes the false assumptions underlying these perceptions. Approaching his subject from the perspective of an anthropologist, he focuses on the social relations and processes that are indexed by Iroquois visual culture through time, and he shows how Iroquois images are deployed in colonized contexts....As he traces the history of Iroquois art practice, Keating seeks a middle road between ethnohistorical approaches and the activist perspectives of contemporary artists.  He is one of the first scholars in Iroquois studies to emphasize painting, a popular art form among present-day Iroquois. He conceptualizes painting broadly, to include writing, incising, drawing, tattoo, body painting, photography, videography, and digital media....Featuring more than 100 color and black-and-white reproductions, this volume embraces a wide array of artworks in diverse media, prompting new appreciation—and deeper understanding—of Iroquois art and its historical and contemporary significance.

Jim Thorpe : A Biography / William A. Cook.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2011.  224pp.  Main Library GV697.T5 C66 2011 : Most biographies of Jim Thorpe (1888-1953) emphasize his Olympic glory and his remarkable abilities in track and football. Thorpe's 1912 gold medals in the decathalon and pentathalon and his talent on the gridiron rank him high among outstanding athletes of the twentieth century. That Thorpe also played brilliantly on the baseball diamond is an often overlooked facet of his career. This narrative of Thorpe's rise and fall in American sports pays particular attention to his time in the major and minor leagues, including his stormy relationship with New York Giants manager John McGraw and baseball's role in stripping Thorpe of his Olympic medals. By chronicling Thorpe's involvement in baseball, football and track concurrently, this profile offers a complete portrait of one of the most versatile athletes in sports history.

The Killing of Crazy Horse / Thomas Powers.  New York : Alfred A. Knopf, c2010.  568pp.  Main Library E99.O3 C7255 2010  : He was the Greatest Indian warrior of the nineteenth century. His victory over General Custer at the battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 was the worst defeat inflicted on the frontier Army. And the death of Crazy Horse in federal custody has remained a controversy for more than a century....The Killing of Crazy Horse pieces together the many sources of fear and misunderstanding that resulted in an official killing hard to distinguish from a crime. A rich cast of characters, whites and Indians alike, passes through this story, including Red Cloud, the chief who dominated Oglala history for fifty years but saw in Crazy Horse a dangerous rival; No Water and Woman Dress, both of whom hated Crazy Horse and schemed against him; the young interpreter Billy Garnett, son of a fifteen-year-old Oglala woman and a Confederate general killed at Gettysburg; General George Crook, who bitterly resented newspaper reports that he had been whipped by Crazy Horse in battle; Little Big Man, who betrayed Crazy Horse; Lieutenant William Philo Clark, the smart West Point graduate who thought he could "work" Indians to do the Army's bidding; and Fast Thunder, who called Crazy Horse cousin, held him the moment he was stabbed, and then told his grandson thirty years later, "They tricked me! They tricked me!"...At the center of the story is Crazy Horse himself, the warrior of few words whom the Crow said they knew best among the Sioux, because he always came closest to them in battle. No photograph of him exists today....The death of Crazy Horse was a traumatic event not only in Sioux but also in American history. With the Great Sioux War as background and context, drawing on many new materials as well as documents in libraries and archives, Thomas Powers recounts the final months and days of Crazy Horse's life not to lay blame but to establish what happened.

King Philip's War : colonial expansion, native resistance, and the end of Indian sovereignty / Daniel R. Mandell.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010.  165pp. Main Library  E83.67 .M329 2010 : King Philip's War was the most devastating conflict between Europeans and Native Americans in the 1600s. In this incisive account, award-winning author Daniel R. Mandell puts the war into its rich historical context....The war erupted in July 1675, after years of growing tension between Plymouth and the Wampanoag sachem Metacom, also known as Philip. Metacom's warriors attacked nearby Swansea, and within months the bloody conflict spread west and erupted in Maine. Native forces ambushed militia detachments and burned towns, driving the colonists back toward Boston. But by late spring 1676, the tide had turned: the colonists fought more effectively and enlisted Native allies while from the west the feared Mohawks attacked Metacom's forces. Thousands of Natives starved, fled the region, surrendered (often to be executed or sold into slavery), or, like Metacom, were hunted down and killed....Mandell explores how decades of colonial expansion and encroachments on Indian sovereignty caused the war and how Metacom sought to enlist the aid of other tribes against the colonists even as Plymouth pressured the Wampanoags to join them. He narrates the colonists' many defeats and growing desperation; the severe shortages the Indians faced during the brutal winter; the collapse of Native unity; and the final hunt for Metacom. In the process, Mandell reveals the complex and shifting relationships among the Native tribes and colonists and explains why the war effectively ended sovereignty for Indians in New England. This fast-paced history incorporates the most recent scholarship on the region and features nine new maps and a bibliographic essay about Native-Anglo relations.

Kiowa military societies : ethnohistory and ritual / William C. MeadowsNorman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010. 455pp.  Main Library E99.K5 M45 2010 : This is an ethnographic study of the military societies of the Kiowa Indians, the largest form of pre-reservation sodality and a continuing vehicle for traditional enculturation. Meadows (anthropology and Native American studies, Missouri State U.) describes the ritual structures, ceremonial composition, and historical development of each of the Kiowa military societies. His treatment includes discussion of origins, structure, functions, rituals, society leaders, dances, music, regalia, paraphernalia, and powwows and their evolution through time. It also includes an examination of Kiowa women's societies. For the early, pre-1900 period, he relies primarily on ethnographic field notes, ledgerbook art, and tribal calendars and for subsequent periods he relies on Kiowa oral history, supplemented by documentary research.

Featured Books, L-O

Featured Books, P-S

The people of the standing stone : the Oneida nation from the Revolution through the Era of Removal / Karim M. Tiro.  Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, c2011.  247pp.  Main Library E99.O45 T57 2011 : Between 1765 and 1845, the Oneida Indian Nation weathered a trio of traumas: war, dispossession, and division. During the American War of Independence, the Oneidas became the revolutionaries most important Indian allies. They undertook a difficult balancing act, helping the patriots while trying to avoid harming their Iroquois brethren. Despite the Oneidas wartime service, they were dispossessed of nearly all their lands through treaties with the state of New York. In eighty years the Oneidas had gone from being an autonomous, powerful people in their ancestral homeland to being residents of disparate, politically exclusive reservation communities separated by up to nine hundred miles and completely surrounded by non-Indians....The Oneidas physical, political, and emotional division persists to this day. Even for those who stayed put, their world changed more in cultural, ecological, and demographic terms than at any time before or since. Oneidas of the post-Revolutionary decades were reluctant pioneers, undertaking more of the adaptations to colonized life than any other generation. Amid such wrenching change, maintaining conti-nuity was itself a creative challenge. The story of that extraordinary endurance lies at the heart of this book.

The people who stayed : southeastern Indian writing after removal / edited by Geary Hobson, Janet McAdams, and Kathryn Walkiewicz.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, 2010.  349pp.  Main Library PS508.I5 P465 2010 : After passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830, tens of thousands of American Indians were relocated from the American Southeast. Yet, as the editors of this volume amply demonstrate, a significant Indian population remained behind after those massive relocations....The first anthology to focus on the literary work of Native Americans who trace their ancestry to "people who stayed" in southeastern states after 1830, this volume represents every state and every genre, including short stories, excerpts from novels, poetry, essays, plays, and even Web postings. Although most works are contemporary, the collection covers the entire post-Removal era. Some of the contributors are well known, while others have only recently emerged as important literary voices....All of the writers in The People Who Stayed affirm their Indian ancestry, though many live outside the Southeast today. As this anthology demonstrates, indigenous Southeastern writing engages the local and the global, the traditional and the modern. While many speak to the prospects and perils of acculturation, all the writers bear witness to the ways, oblique or straightforward, that they and their families continue to honor their Indian identities despite the legacy of removal....In an introduction to the volume and in headnotes on each contributor, the editors provide historical context and literary insight on the diversity of writing and lived experiences found in these pages. All readers, from students to scholars, will gain newfound understanding of the literature---and the human experience---of Native people of the American Southeast.

The Peyote road : religious freedom and the Native American Church / Thomas Constantine Maroukis.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.  281pp.  Main Library E98.R3 M287 2010 : Despite challenges by the federal government to restrict the use of Peyote, the Native American Church, which uses the hallucinogenic cactus as a religious sacrament, has become the largest indigenous denomination among American Indians today. The Peyote Road examines the history of the NAC, including its legal struggles to defend the controversial use of Peyote....Thomas C. Maroukis has conducted extensive interviews with NAC members and leaders to craft an authoritative account of the church's history, diverse religious practices, and significant people. His book integrates a narrative history of the Peyote faith with analysis of its religious beliefs and practices--as well as its art and music--and an emphasis on the views of NAC members....Deftly blending oral histories and legal research, Maroukis traces the religion's history from its Mesoamerican roots to the legal incorporation of the NAC; its expansion to the northern plains, Great Basin, and Southwest; and challenges to Peyotism by state and federal governments, including the Supreme Court decision in Oregon v. Smith. He also introduces readers to the inner workings of the NAC with descriptions of its organizational structure and the Cross Fire and Half Moon services....The Peyote Road updates Omer Stewart's classic 1987 study of the Peyote religion by taking into consideration recent events and scholarship. In particular, Maroukis discusses not only the church's current legal issues but also the diminishing Peyote supply and controversies surrounding the definition of membership....Today approximately 300,000 American Indians are members of the Native American Church. The Peyote Road marks a significant case study of First Amendment rights and deepens our understanding of the struggles of NAC members to practice their faith.

Phantom past, indigenous presence : native ghosts in North American culture and history / edited and with an introduction by Colleen E. Boyd and Coll Thrush.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.  317pp.  E98.R3 P493 2011 : The imagined ghosts of Native Americans have been an important element of colonial fantasy in North America ever since European settlements were established in the seventeenth century. Native burial grounds and Native ghosts have long played a role in both regional and local folklore and in the national literature of the United States and Canada, as settlers struggled to create a new identity for themselves that melded their European heritage with their new, North American frontier surroundings. In this interdisciplinary volume, Colleen E. Boyd and Coll Thrush bring together scholars from a variety of fields to discuss this North American fascination with “the phantom Native American.”...Phantom Past, Indigenous Presence explores the importance of ancestral spirits and historic places in Indigenous and settler communities as they relate to territory and history—in particular cultural, political, social, historical, and environmental contexts. From examinations of how individuals reacted to historical cases of “hauntings,” to how Native phantoms have functioned in the literature of North Americans, to interdisciplinary studies of how such beliefs and narratives allowed European settlers and Indigenous people to make sense of the legacies of colonialism and conquest, these essays show how the past and the present are intertwined through these stories

Pipestone : my life in an Indian boarding school / Adam Fortunate Eagle ; afterword by Laurence M. Hauptman.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010. 193pp.  Main Library E97.6.P65 E23 2010 : Fortunate Eagle, a one-time leader of the 1969-1971 occupation of Alcatraz by Native American activists, presents an episodic and non-chronological memoir of his time attending the Pipestone Indian Boarding School from 1935 to 1945. Because of the reputation of the Indian boarding schools as being institutions dedicated to the eradication of Native American culture, readers may be surprised to find Fortunate Eagle's recollections as relatively positive, particularly concerning Commissioner of Indian Affairs John Collier's 1934 reforms supporting Indian language and culture, which Fortunate Eagle judges to have been a success, based on his personal memories of Pipestone.

The poetry and poetics of Gerald Vizenor / edited by Deborah L. Madsen.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2012.  Also available online

The power of song : music and dance in the mission communities of northern New Spain, 1590-1810 / Kristin Dutcher Mann.  Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press ; Berkeley, California : The Academy of American Franciscan History, 2010.  300pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML3916 .M35 2010 : Mann offers this first ever in-depth study on the music of Franciscan and Jesuit missions in the Northern New Spain frontier territories. The Author begins with a profile on the traditional music of the indigenous people of the region and of Catholic music of the time. Upon the discovery of the Natives' inclination toward music, the Catholic missionaries proceeded to use music to shape the identities and world perceptions of the natives. The result was a new form of music which fused indigenous and Spanish Catholic styles. Mann also investigates the psychological, theological, and sociological effects this music had on the natives. Co-published with the Academy of American Franciscan History.

The Pueblo Revolt and the mythology of conquest : an indigenous archaeology of contact / Michael V. WilcoxBerkeley : University of California Press, c2010.  316pp.  Main Library E99.P9 W55 2010 : In a groundbreaking book that challenges familiar narratives of discontinuity, disease-based demographic collapse, and acculturation, Michael V. Wilcox upends many deeply held assumptions about native peoples in North America. His provocative book poses the question, What if we attempted to explain their presence in contemporary society five hundred years after Columbus instead of their disappearance or marginalization? Wilcox looks in particular at the 1680 Pueblo Revolt in colonial New Mexico, the most successful indigenous rebellion in the Americas, as a case study for dismantling the mythology of the perpetually vanishing Indian. Bringing recent archaeological findings to bear on traditional historical accounts, Wilcox suggests that a more profitable direction for understanding the history of Native cultures should involve analyses of issues such as violence, slavery, and the creative responses they generated.

Queequeg's coffin : indigenous literacies and early American literature / Birgit Brander Rasmussen.  Durham : Duke University Press, 2012.  207pp.  PM155 .B73 2012 : The encounter between European and native peoples in the Americas is often portrayed as a conflict between literate civilization and illiterate savagery. That perception ignores the many indigenous forms of writing that were not alphabet-based, such as Mayan pictoglyphs, Iroquois wampum, Ojibwe birch-bark scrolls, and Incan quipus. Queequeg's Coffin offers a new definition of writing that comprehends the dazzling diversity of literature in the Americas before and after European arrivals. This groundbreaking study recovers previously overlooked moments of textual reciprocity in the colonial sphere, from a 1645 French-Haudenosaunee Peace Council to Herman Melville's youthful encounters with Polynesian hieroglyphics....By recovering the literatures and textual practices that were indigenous to the Americas, Birgit Brander Rasmussen reimagines the colonial conflict as one organized by alternative but equally rich forms of literacy. From central Mexico to the northeastern shores of North America, in the Andes and across the American continents, indigenous peoples and European newcomers engaged each other in dialogues about ways of writing and recording knowledge. In Queequeg's Coffin, such exchanges become the foundation for a new kind of early American literary studies.

Recording culture : Powwow music and the Aboriginal recording industry on the Northern Plains / Christopher A. Scales.  Durham, NC : Duke University Press, 2012.

Red brethren : the Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the problem of race in early America / David J. Silverman.  Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 2010.  279pp. Main Library E99.B7 S56 2010: New England Indians created the multitribal Brothertown and Stockbridge communities during the eighteenth century with the intent of using Christianity and civilized reforms to cope with white expansion. In Red Brethren, David J. Silverman considers the stories of these communities and argues that Indians in early America were racial thinkers in their own right and that indigenous people rallied together as Indians not only in the context of violent resistance but also in campaigns to adjust peacefully to white dominion. All too often, the Indians discovered that their many concessions to white demands earned them no relief....In the era of the American Revolution, the pressure of white settlements forced the Brothertowns and Stockbridges from New England to Oneida country in upstate New York. During the early nineteenth century, whites forced these Indians from Oneida country, too, until they finally wound up in Wisconsin. Tired of moving, in the 1830Æs and 1840Æs, the Brothertowns and Stock-bridges became some of the first Indians to accept U.S. citizenship, which they called "becoming white," in the hope that this status would enable them to remain as Indians in Wisconsin. Even then, whites would not leave them alone....Red Brethren traces the evolution of Indian ideas about race under this relentless pressure. In the early seventeenth century, indigenous people did not conceive of themselves as Indian. They sharpened their sense of Indian identity as they realized that Christianity would not bridge their many differences with whites, and as they fought to keep blacks out of their communities. The stories of Brothertown and Stockbridge shed light on the dynamism of Indians' own racial history and the place of Indians in the racial history of early America.

Red medicine : traditional indigenous rites of birthing and healing / Patrisia Gonzales.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2012.  273pp. Main Library  E98.R3 G66 2012 : Patrisia Gonzales addresses "Red Medicine" as a system of healing that includes birthing practices, dreaming, and purification rites to re-establish personal and social equilibrium. The book explores Indigenous medicine across North America, with a special emphasis on how Indigenous knowledge has endured and persisted among peoples with a legacy to Mexico. Gonzales combines her lived experience in Red Medicine as an herbalist and traditional birth attendant ith in-depth research into oral traditions, storytelling, and the meanings of symbols to uncover how Indigenous knowledge endures over time. And she shows how this knowledge is now being reclaimed by Chicanos, Mexican Americans and Mexican Indigenous peoples.

Red power rising : the National Indian Youth Council and the origins of Native Activism / Bradley G. Shreve ; foreword by Shirley Hill Witt. Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2011.  275pp.  Main Library E98.T77 .S49 2011 : Shreve chronicles the origins of the National Indian Youth Council (NIYC) from its cultural and historical underpinnings in 19th century and early 20th century intertribal movements, through its trajectory and activities in the 1960s, and into its legacy with movements such as the American Indian Movement (AIM). The NIYC was a student activist group which possessed the same sense of urgency and purpose as contemporary student groups such as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), but differed from those groups in that it did not rebel against its elders but continued a long tradition of Native values. Those values included support for tribal sovereignty, support for continuation of traditional cultural activities, and the inclusion of women in important leadership roles.

Reimagining Indian country : native American migration & identity in twentieth-century Los Angeles / Nicolas G. Rosenthal.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  239pp.  Main Library E78.C15 R67 2012 : For decades, most American Indians have lived in cities, not on reservations or in rural areas. Still, scholars, policymakers, and popular culture often regard Indians first as reservation peoples, living apart from non-Native Americans. In this book, Nicolas Rosenthal reorients our understanding of the experience of American Indians by tracing their migration to cities, exploring the formation of urban Indian communities, and delving into the shifting relationships between reservations and urban areas from the early twentieth century to the present....With a focus on Los Angeles, which by 1970 had more Native American inhabitants than any place outside the Navajo reservation, Re-Imagining Indian Country shows how cities have played a defining role in modern American Indian life and examines the evolution of Native American identity in recent decades. Rosenthal emphasizes the lived experiences of Native migrants in realms including education, labor, health, housing, and social and political activism to understand how they adapted to an urban environment, and to consider how they formed--and continue to form--new identities. Though still connected to the places where indigenous peoples have preserved their culture, Rosenthal argues that Indian identity must be understood as dynamic and fully enmeshed in modern global networks.

Religious transformation in the late pre-Hispanic Pueblo world / edited by Donna M. Glowacki and Scott Van Keuren.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, 2012 [c2011]  310pp.  Main Library E99.P9 R293 2012 : The mid-thirteenth century AD marks the beginning of tremendous social change among Ancestral Pueblo peoples of the northern US Southwest that foreshadow the emergence of the modern Pueblo world. Regional depopulations, long-distance migrations, and widespread resettlement into large plaza-oriented villages forever altered community life. Archaeologists have tended to view these historical events as adaptive responses to climatic, environmental, and economic conditions. Recently, however, more attention is being given to the central role of religion during these transformative periods, and to how archaeological remains embody the complex social practices through which Ancestral Pueblo  understandings of sacred concepts were expressed and transformed....The contributors to this volume employ a wide range of archaeological evidence to examine the origin and development of religious ideologies and the ways they shaped Pueblo societies across the Southwest in the centuries prior to European contact. With its fresh theoretical approach, it contributes to a better understanding of both the Pueblo past and the anthropological study of religion in ancient contexts This volume will be of interest to both regional specialists and to scholars who work with the broader dimensions of religion and ritual in the human experience. 

Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907 / Wendy St. Jean.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2011.  156pp.  Main Library E99.C55 S7 2011: In the early 1800s, the U.S. government attempted to rid the Southeast of Indians in order to make way for trading networks, American emigration, optimal land use, economic development opportunities, and, ultimately, territorial expansion westward to the Pacific. The difficult removal of the Chickasaw Nation to Indian Territory—later to become part of the state of Oklahoma— was exacerbated by the U.S. government’s unenlightened decision to place the Chickasaws on lands it had previously provided solely for the Choctaw Nation....This volume deals with the challenges the Chickasaw people had from attacking Texans and Plains Indians, the tribe’s ex-slaves, the influence on the tribe of intermarried white men, and the presence of illegal aliens (U.S. citizens) in their territory. By focusing on the tribal and U.S. government policy conflicts, as well as longstanding attempts of the Chickasaw people to remain culturally unique, St. Jean reveals the successes and failures of the Chickasaw in attaining and maintaining sovereignty as a separate and distinct Chickasaw Nation.

Removable type : histories of the book in Indian country, 1663-1880 / Phillip H. Round.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.  282pp. Main Library  E98.B65 R68 2010 : In 1663, the Puritan missionary John Eliot, with the help of a Nipmuck convert whom the English called James Printer, produced the first Bible printed in North America. It was printed not in English but in Algonquian, making it one of the first books printed in a Native language. In this ambitious and multidisciplinary work, Phillip H. Round examines the relationship between Native Americans and printed books over a two-hundred-year period, uncovering the individual, communal, regional, and political contexts for Native peoples' use of the printed word. From the northeastern woodlands to the Great Plains, Round argues, alphabetic literacy and printed books mattered greatly in the emergent, transitional cultural formations of indigenous nations threatened by European imperialism....Removable Type showcases the varied ways that Native peoples produced and utilized printed texts over time, approaching them as both opportunity and threat. Surveying this rich history, Round addresses such issues as the role of white missionaries and Christian texts in the dissemination of print culture in Indian Country, the establishment of "national" publishing houses by tribes, the production and consumption of bilingual texts, the importance of copyright in establishing Native intellectual sovereignty (and the sometimes corrosive effects of reprinting thereon), and the significance of illustrations.

Reservation "capitalism" : economic development in Indian country / Robert J. Miller.  Santa Barbara : Praeger, c2012.  208pp.  Main Library  E98.E2 M55 2012 : Robert Miller challenges that aspect of the noble savage myth that depicts Native Americans as forest-dwelling socialists. Instead, in addition to communal institutions, he argues they had vibrant, if misunderstood private economy. In that spirit, he further argues that native populations reduced to living on reservations should embrace their entrepreneurial heritage to build self-sufficiency and sovereignty. Miller looks at the history of native economies before and after European contact. He considers the problems facing native populations today, as well as the economic opportunities some have already or still could exploit, to make the case for how to build reservation economies. Miller is a professor of law at Lewis and Clark College as well as a citizen of the East Shawnee Tribe.

Reservation reelism : redfacing, visual sovereignty, and representations of Native Americans in film / Michelle H. RahejaLincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2010.  338pp. Main Library  PN1995.9.I48 R34 2010 :In this deeply engaging account Michelle H. Raheja offers the first book-length study of the Indigenous actors, directors, and spectators who helped shape Hollywood's representation of Indigenous peoples. Since the era of silent films, Hollywood movies and visual culture generally have provided the primary representational field on which Indigenous images have been displayed to non-Native audiences. These films have been highly influential in shaping perceptions of Indigenous peoples as, for example, a dying race or as inherently unable or unwilling to adapt to change. However, films with Indigenous plots and subplots also signify at least some degree of Native presence in a culture that largely defines Native peoples as absent or separate....Native actors, directors, and spectators have had a part in creating these cinematic representations and have thus complicated the dominant, and usually negative, messages about Native peoples that films portray. In Reservation Reelism Raheja examines the history of these Native actors, directors, and spectators, reveals their contributions, and attempts to create positive representations in film that reflect the complex and vibrant experiences of Native peoples and communities.

Rez life : an Indian's journey through reservation life / David Treuer.  New York : Atlantic Monthly Press, 2012.  330pp.  Main Library  E93 .T74 2012 : Celebrated novelist David Treuer has gained a reputation for writing fiction that expands the horizons of Native American literature. In Rez Life, his first full-length work of nonfiction, Treuer brings a novelist’s storytelling skill and an eye for detail to a complex and subtle examination of Native American reservation life, past and present....With authoritative research and reportage, Treuer illuminates misunderstood contemporary issues of sovereignty, treaty rights, and natural-resource conservation. He traces the waves of public policy that have disenfranchised and exploited Native Americans, exposing the tension that has marked the historical relationship between the United States government and the Native American population. Through the eyes of students, teachers, government administrators, lawyers, and tribal court judges, he shows how casinos, tribal government, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs have transformed the landscape of Native American life....A member of the Ojibwe of northern Minnesota, Treuer grew up on Leech Lake Reservation, but was educated in mainstream America. Exploring crime and poverty, casinos and wealth, and the preservation of native language and culture, Rez Life is a strikingly original work of history and reportage, a must read for anyone interested in the Native American story.

Rich Indians : Native people and the problem of wealth in American history / Alexandra Harmon.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2010.  388pp. Main Library E98.E2 H37 2010 : Long before lucrative tribal casinos sparked controversy, Native Americans amassed other wealth that provoked intense debate about the desirability, morality, and compatibility of Indian and non-Indian economic practices. Skillfully blending social, cultural, and economic history, Alexandra Harmon examines seven such instances of Indian affluence and the dilemmas they presented both for Native Americans and for Euro-Americans---dilemmas rooted in the colonial origins of the modern American economy....This wide-ranging book looks at controversies concerning Powhatan economic status and aims during the Virginia colony's first years; the ambitions of some bicultural eighteenth-century Creeks and Mohawks; prospering Indians of the Southeast in the early 1800s; inequality among removed tribes during the Gilded Age; the spending of oil-rich Osages in the Roaring Twenties; resurgent tribal communities from Alaska to Maine in the 1970s; and casinos that have drawn gamblers to Indian country across the United States since the 1990s. Harmon's study not only comples us to look beyond stereotypes of greedy whites and impoverished Indians, but also convincingly demonstrates that Indians deserve a prominent place in American economic history and in the history of American ideas.

Roanoke : solving the mystery of the Lost Colony / Lee Miller.  New York : Arcade Pub., c2012.  362pp.  Main Library F229 .M65 2012 : November 1587. A report reaches London that Sir Walter Raleigh’s expedition, which left England months before to land the first English settlers in America, has foundered. On Roanoke Island, off the coast of North Carolina, a tragedy is unfolding. Something has gone very wrong, and the colony—115 men, women, and children, among them the first English child born in the New World, Virginia Dare—is in trouble. But there will be no rescue. Before help can reach them, all will vanish with barely a trace....The Lost Colony is America’s oldest unsolved mystery. In this remarkable example of historical detective work, Lee Miller goes back to the original evidence and offers a fresh solution to the enduring legend. She establishes beyond doubt that the tragedy of the Lost Colony did not begin on the shores of Roanoke but within the walls of Westminster, in the inner circle of Queen Elizabeth’s government. As Miller detects, powerful men had reason to want Raleigh’s mission to fail. Furthermore, Miller shows what must have become of the settlers, left to face a hostile world that was itself suffering the upheavals of an alien invasion. Narrating a thrilling tale of court intrigue, spy rings, treachery, sabotage, Native American politics, and colonial power, Miller has finally shed light on a four-hundred-year-old unsolved mystery.

Savage anxieties : the invention of western civilization / Robert A. Williams, Jr.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. 265pp.  Main Library   GN380 .W549 2012  :  From one of the world's leading experts on Native American law and indigenous peoples' human rights comes an original and striking intellectual history of the tribe and Western civilization that sheds new light on how we understand ourselves and our contemporary society. Throughout the centuries, conquest, war, and unspeakable acts of violence and dispossession have all been justified by citing civilization's opposition to these differences represented by the tribe. Robert Williams, award winning author, legal scholar, and member of the Lumbee Indian Tribe, proposes a wide-ranging reexamination of the history of the Western world, told from the perspective of civilization's war on tribalism as a way of life. Williams shows us how what we thought we knew about the rise of Western civilization over the tribe is in dire need of reappraisal.

The Second Creek War : interethnic conflict and collusion on a collapsing frontier / John T. Ellisor.  Lincoln, Neb. : University of Nebraska Press, c2010.  497pp.  Main Library E83.836 .E44 2010 : Historians have traditionally viewed the "Creek War of 1836" as a minor police action centered on rounding up the Creek Indians for removal to Indian Territory. Using extensive archival research, John T. Ellisor demonstrates that, in fact, the Second Creek War was neither brief nor small. Indeed, armed conflict continued long after "peace" was declared and the majority of Creeks had been sent west....Ellisor's study also broadly illuminates southern society just prior to the Indian removals, a time when many blacks, whites, and Natives lived in close proximity in the Old Southwest. In the Creek country, also called New Alabama, these ethnic groups began to develop a pluralistic society. When the 1830s cotton boom placed a premium on Creek land, however, dispossession of the Natives became an economic priority. Dispossessed and impoverished, some Creeks rose in armed revolt both to resist removal west and to drive the oppressors from their ancient homeland. Yet the resulting Second Creek War, which raged over three states, was fueled not only by Native determination but also by economic competition and was intensified not least by the massive government-sponsored land grab that constituted Indian removal. Because these circumstances also created fissures throughout southern society, both whites and blacks found it in their best interests to help the Creek insurgents. This first book-length examination of the Second Creek War shows how interethnic collusion and conflict characterized southern society during the 1830s.

Seneca possessed : Indians, witchcraft, and power in the early American republic / Matthew Dennis.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2010.  313pp.  Main Library E99.S3 D466 2010 : Seneca Possessed examines the ordeal of a Native people in the wake of the American Revolution. As part of the once-formidable Iroquois Six Nations in western New York, Senecas occupied a significant if ambivalent place within the newly established United States. They found themselves the object of missionaries' conversion efforts while also confronting land speculators, poachers, squatters, timber-cutters, and officials from state and federal governments....In response, Seneca communities sought to preserve their territories and culture amid a maelstrom of economic, social, religious, and political change. They succeeded through a remarkable course of cultural innovation and conservation, skillful calculation and luck, and the guidance of both a Native prophet and unusual Quakers. Through the prophecies of Handsome Lake and the message of Quaker missionaries, this process advanced fitfully, incorporating elements of Christianity and white society and economy, along with older Seneca ideas and practices....But cultural reinvention did not come easily. Episodes of Seneca witch-hunting reflected the wider crises the Senecas were experiencing. Ironically, as with so much of their experience in this period, such episodes also allowed for the preservation of Seneca sovereignty, as in the case of Tommy Jemmy, a Seneca chief tried by New York in 1821 for executing a Seneca "witch." Here Senecas improbably but successfully defended their right to self-government. Through the stories of Tommy Jemmy, Handsome Lake, and others, Seneca Possessed explores how the Seneca people and their homeland were "possessed"—culturally, spiritually, materially, and legally—in the era of early American independence.

A separate country : postcoloniality and American Indian nations / Elizabeth Cook-Lynn.  Lubbock, TX : Texas Tech University Press, c2012  216pp.  Main Library E78.W5 C575 2012 : Elizabeth Cook-Lynn takes academia to task for its much-touted notion that “postcoloniality” is the current condition of Indian communities in the United States. She finds the argument neither believable nor useful—at best an ivory-tower initiative on the part of influential scholars, at worst a cruel joke. In this fin de career retrospective, Cook-Lynn gathers evidence that American Indians remain among the most colonized people in the modern world, mired in poverty and disenfranchised both socially and politically.   Despite Native-initiated efforts toward seeking First Nationhood status in the U. S., Cook-Lynn posits, Indian lands remain in the grip of a centuries-old English colonial system—a renewable source of conflict and discrimination. She argues that proportionately in the last century, government-supported development of casinos and tourism—peddled as an answer to poverty—probably cost Indians more treaty-protected land than they lost in the entire nineteenth century. Using land issues and third-world theory to look at the historiography of the American Plains Indian experience, she examines colonization’s continuing assault on Indigenous peoples.

Sequoyah and the invention of the Cherokee alphabet / April R. Summitt.  Santa Barbara : Greenwood, c2012.  164pp.  Main Library E99.C5 S38912 2012 : Part of the Landmarks of the American Mosaic series for high school and undergraduate students on key events and figures in American multiculturalism, this volume on Sequoyah, who developed the written form of the Cherokee language, examines the creation of the written language and explores the cultural, social, and political ramifications of its introduction both internally within the Native American nation, and in its perceptions by, and dealings with, white Americans. The volume chronicles the life and work of Sequoyah and includes a chronology of events, biographical sketches of key figures in the narrative, and a collection of primary documents, including some of the rare surviving original documents in written Cherokee.

Sequoyah Rising : Problems in Post-Colonial Tribal Governance / Steve Russell.  Durham, N.C. : Carolina Academic Press, c2010.  186pp.  Main Library E99.C5 R95 2010 : Since 1789, the United States has had an “Indian problem.” Since 1492, the Indians have had a colonial problem. It's the same problem. The two sides of the problem typically relate to each other from their respective defensive crouches, and particularly the Indian side has been too fearful, in this atmosphere, to engage in constructive self-criticism. We demand self-determination while knowing in our private interactions that our tribal governments are not handling the degree of self-determination we have now in a way that satisfies most of the governed. Sequoyah Rising is the first book to address the democracy deficit in tribal governments directly but from an Indian point of view. Other attempts to deal with the question have typically been by non-Indians intent on portraying tribal governments as bastions of racial privilege and having as their object not reform but destruction. If democratic theories underlying the US Constitution have American Indian origins, this book argues, Indians should be able to govern themselves in the 21st century in a democratic and transparent manner. Nothing written here is to absolve the US government from responsibility for the homicides, the thefts, and the broken promises, and much of that ignominious history is recounted. However, the purpose is to help Indian nations do the best they can with what they have, understanding that the most important milestone towards a return to freedom will be an end to dependence. In the Supreme Court, the rights of Indians have proceeded in the opposite direction from the rights of other minorities, becoming less intellectually coherent and less protective of Indian rights whether asserted individually or collectively. The famous cases that memorialize the victories of the mainstream civil rights movement simply have no analogs in federal Indian law. Therefore, it will probably be necessary at some point to win our freedom the same way the former slaves did, by exhibiting the courage demanded by militant nonviolence.

Shapeshifting : transformations in Native American art / Karen Kramer Russell, with Janet Catherine Berlo ... [et al.], and contributions by Kathleen Ash-Milby ... [et al.]  Salem, Mass. : Peabody Essex Museum ; New Haven, Conn. : Yale University Press, 2012.  244pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N6538.A4 S436 2012 : Public perception of Native American art and culture has often been derived from misunderstandings and misinterpretations, and from images promulgated by popular culture. Typically, Native Americans are grouped as a whole and their art and culture considered part of the past rather than widely present. Shapeshifting challenges these assumptions by focusing on the objects as art rather than cultural or anthropological artifacts and on the multivalent creativity of Native American artists. The approach highlights the inventive contemporaneity that existed in all periods and continues today. More than 75 works in a wide range of media and scale are organized into four thematic groups: changing—expanding the imagination; knowing—expressing worldview; locating—exploring identity and place; and voicing—engaging the individual. The result is a paradigm shift in understanding Native American art.

Short nights of the Shadow Catcher : the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis / Timothy Egan.  Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2012.  370pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection on order : "Edward Curtis was dashing, charismatic, a passionate mountaineer, a famous photographer--the Annie Liebowitz of his time. And he was thirty-two years old in 1900 when he gave it all up to pursue his great idea: He would try to capture on film the NativeAmerican nation before it disappeared. At once an incredible adventure narrative and a penetrating biographical portrait, Egan's book tells the remarkable untold story behind Curtis's iconic photographs, following him throughout Indian country from desert to rainforest as he struggled to document the stories and rituals of more than eighty tribes. Even with the backing of Theodore Roosevelt and J.P. Morgan, it took tremendous perseverance--six years alone to convince the Hopi to allow him into their Snake Dance ceremony. The undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. He would die penniless and unknown in Hollywood just a few years after publishing the last of his twenty volumes. But the charming rogue with the grade-school education had fulfilled his promise--his great adventure succeeded in creating one of America's most stunning cultural achievements."

Sitting Bull, Prisoner of War / by Dennis C. Pope.  Pierre, S.D. : South Dakota State Historical Society Press, c2010.  187pp.  Main Library E99.D1 S6129 2010  : While there are many books about Sitting Bull's life, this may be the only one focusing on the 22 months he spent as a prisoner of the U.S. Army at Fort Randall, in what is now South Dakota. Using first-person accounts (including the reporting of a Minnesota-based journalist), Pope looks at the great chief's day-to-day life in captivity, showing how he continued to conduct tribal business and, importantly, learned to deal with the white officials who had come to control the future of the Lakota people. The author's engaging style makes this a very readable history, and it will have great appeal to anyone interested in Native American history or the history of the westward movement in the U.S. Includes 24 pages of photographs and illustrations.

Slavery in Indian country : the changing face of captivity in early America / Christina Snyder.  Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, c2010.  329pp.  Main Library E85 .S69 2010 : Slavery existed in North America long before the first Africans arrived at Jamestown in 1619. For centuries, from the pre-Columbian era through the 1840s, Native Americans took prisoners of war and killed, adopted, or enslaved them. Christina Snyder’s pathbreaking book takes a familiar setting for bondage, the American South, and places Native Americans at the center of her engrossing story....Indian warriors captured a wide range of enemies, including Africans, Europeans, and other Indians. Yet until the late eighteenth century, age and gender more than race affected the fate of captives. As economic and political crises mounted, however, Indians began to racialize slavery and target African Americans. Native people struggling to secure a separate space for themselves in America developed a shared language of race with white settlers. Although the Indians’ captivity practices remained fluid long after their neighbors hardened racial lines, the Second Seminole War ultimately tore apart the inclusive communities that Native people had created through centuries of captivity....Snyder’s rich and sweeping history of Indian slavery connects figures like Andrew Jackson and Cherokee chief Dragging Canoe with little-known captives like Antonia Bonnelli, a white teenager from Spanish Florida, and David George, a black runaway from Virginia. Placing the experiences of these individuals within a complex system of captivity and Indians’ relations with other peoples, Snyder demonstrates the profound role of Native American history in the American past.

Smoke signals : the native takeback of North America's tobacco industry / Jim Poling, Sr.  Toronto ; Tonawanda, N.Y. : Dundurn, c2012.  253pp. Main Library E98.T6 P65 2012 : When Europeans discovered tobacco among Amerindians in the New World, it became a long-sought panacea of panaceas, the critical ingredient in enemas, ointments, syrups, and powders employed to treat everything from syphilis to cancer. Almost five centuries passed before medical researchers concluded that tobacco is unhealthy and can cause cancer....Smoke Signals follows tobacco from its origins in South America's Andes through its checkered history as a "miracle cure," powerful addictive and poison, friend of government revenue departments, and enemy of law enforcement directed at contraband and tax diversion. Author Jim Poling, Sr., traces tobacco's sacredness among Natives, notably how the modern substance has changed Native lives, sometimes for the good, often for the bad, explores how the coffers of governments, now so dependent on tobacco revenue, will be affected if the plant's commercial use is eliminated, and examines how Native traditions, including tobacco as a holy herb, might survive in modern society and strengthen Natives.

Spanish attempts to colonize southeast North America, 1513-1587 / Larry Richard Clark.  Jefferson, N.C. : Clark McFarland & Co., 2010.  207pp.  Main Library F212 .C53 2010 : Although Spain's attempts to colonize Southeast North America in the 16th century proved a dismal failure, the Spanish empire nonetheless played a significant role in shaping the United States history and the region's cultural, economic, and agricultural foundations. It was the Spanish, after all, who introduced the New World to both domesticated animals and a number of foreign crops, from sugar cane and citrus fruit to wheat, barley, and oats. This book details the role of the Spanish empire in early America and its contact with Native Americans who lived on this land, beginning almost five centuries ago duringel siglo de oro de Espana, or the Golden Century of Spain. Topics include the celebrated voyages of Christopher Columbus; the Ponce de Leon, Narvaez, de Soto, Luna and Pardo expeditions; and the contributions of modern archaeology in unlocking the secrets of the conquistadors' past and the Indian tribes they encountered.

Sustaining the Cherokee family : kinship and the allotment of an indigenous nation / Rose Stremlau.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2011.  320pp.  Main Library E99.C5 S8665 2011 : During the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the federal government sought to forcibly assimilate Native Americans into American society through systematized land allotment. In Sustaining the Cherokee Family, Rose Stremlau illuminates the impact of this policy on the Cherokee Nation, particularly within individual families and communities in modern-day northeastern Oklahoma....Emphasizing Cherokee agency, Stremlau reveals that Cherokee families' organization, cultural values, and social and economic practices allowed them to adapt to private land ownership by incorporating elements of the new system into existing domestic and community-based economies. Drawing on evidence from a range of sources, including Cherokee and United States censuses, federal and tribal records, local newspapers, maps, county probate records, family histories, and contemporary oral histories, Stremlau demonstrates that Cherokee management of land perpetuated the values and behaviors associated with their sense of kinship, therefore uniting extended families. And, although the loss of access to land and communal resources slowly impoverished the region, it reinforced the Cherokees' interdependence. Stremlau argues that the persistence of extended family bonds allowed indigenous communities to retain a collective focus and resist aspects of federal assimilation policy during a period of great social upheaval.

Featured Books, T-Z

The taking of American Indian lands in the Southeast : a history of territorial cessions and forced relocation, 1607-1840 / David W. Miller.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., Publishers, 2011.  222pp.  Main Library E78.S65 M56 2011 : Between the time of the settling of Jamestown and the Trail of Tears in the 1830's, thousands of American Indians were induced to cede their lands to European settlers and move westward. This book, with the aid of maps and pictures, relies primarily on the words of those involved to provide an historical accounting of the forced relocations. Presidential policies are examined, as well as the various ways in which the Indians attempted to maintain their cultural identity during these upheavals. Cultural and community splits within the Creek, Cherokee and Seminole nations are also explored in detail.

Telling stories in the face of danger : language renewal in Native American communities / edited by Paul V. Kroskrity.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2012.  269pp.  Main Library PM206 .T45 2012 : Anthropologists explain the work that stories, storytelling tropes, and related verbal art do and have done to maintain Native American cultures as vital processes of cultural and linguistic reproduction. Looking first at storytelling as a cultural resource, then at storytelling troubles and transformations, they discuss such aspects as how Kiowa stories express tribal memory, ideology, and being; language ideologies, narratives, and Southern Paiute linguistic and cultural reproduction; Kumiai stories: bridges between the oral tradition and classroom practice; pedagogy, storytelling, and the ironies of language endangerment on the White Mountain Apache Reservation; and replicating proper ways of speaking in and through contemporary Navajo poetry.

"That the people might live" : loss and renewal in Native American elegy  / Arnold Krupat.  Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2012.  Also available online

Thinking in Indian : a John Mohawk reader / edited by Jos ̌Barreiro.  Golden, Colo. : Fulcrum Pub., c2010. 289pp.  Main Library E99.S3 M64 2010 : Thinking in Indian: A John Mohawk Reader presents the Native perception of philosopher-thinker-activist John Mohawk (Sotsisowah). An elder of the Seneca Nation and deeply rooted Haudenosaune (Iroquois) traditionalist, Mohawk's intellectual approach is keenly universal while founded in the practice of his ancient longhouse culture. A participant and leader in the Native traditional movement, John Mohawk's gifted oratory and clear thinking became the basis of a substantial current of Native activism. These essays, produced and published over thirty years, are prescient in the prophetic tradition yet thoroughly current. They reflect consistent engagement in Native events and issues and deliver a profoundly indigenous analysis of modern existence. Native sovereignty, cultural roots and world view, land and treaty rights, globalization impacts and mitigation, spiritual formulations, and fundamental human wisdom coalesce to provide a genuinely indigenous perspective on current events.

Three Fires unity : the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron borderlands / Phil Bellfy.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.  203pp.  Main Library  and Faculty Book Collection  E99.C6 B426 2011  : The Lake Huron area of the Upper Great Lakes region, an area spreading across vast parts of the United States and Canada, has been inhabited by the Anishnaabeg for millennia. Since their first contact with Europeans around 1600, the Anishnaabeg have interacted with—and struggled against—changing and shifting European empires and the emerging nation-states that have replaced them. Through their cultural strength, diplomatic acumen, and a remarkable knack for adapting to change, the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron Borderlands have reemerged as a strong and vital people, fully in charge of their destiny in the twenty-first century....Winner of the North American Indian Prose Award, this first comprehensive cross-border history of the Anishnaabeg provides an engaging account of four hundred years of their life in the Lake Huron area, showing how they have been affected by European contact and trade. Three Fires Unity examines how shifting European politics and, later, the imposition of the Canada–United States border running through their homeland, affected them and continues to do so today. In looking at the cultural, social, and political aspects of this borderland contact, Phil Bellfy sheds light on how the Anishnaabeg were able to survive and even thrive over the centuries in this intensely contested region.

A thrilling narrative of Indian captivity : dispatches from the Dakota War / Mary Butler Renville ; edited by Carrie Reber Zeman and Kathryn Zabelle Derounian-Stodola ; foreword by Gwen N. Westerman.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2012.  375pp.  Main Library E83.86 .R46 2012 : This edition of A Thrilling Narrative of Indian Captivity rescues from obscurity a crucially important work about the bitterly contested U.S.-Dakota War of 1862. Written by Mary Butler Renville, an Anglo woman, with the assistance of her Dakota husband, John Baptiste Renville, A Thrilling Narrative was printed only once as a book in 1863 and has not been republished since. The work details the Renvilles’ experiences as “captives” among their Dakota kin in the Upper Camp and chronicles the story of the Dakota Peace Party. Their sympathetic portrayal of those who opposed the war in 1862 combats the stereotypical view that most Dakotas supported it and illumines the injustice of their exile from Dakota homelands. From the authors’ unique perspective as an interracial couple, they paint a complex picture of race, gender, and class relations on successive midwestern frontiers....As the state of Minnesota commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Dakota War, this narrative provides fresh insights into the most controversial event in the region’s history. This annotated edition includes groundbreaking historical and literary contexts for the text and a first-time collection of extant Dakota correspondence with authorities during the war.

Tipi : heritage of the Great Plains / edited by Nancy B. Rosoff, Susan Kennedy Zeller. Seattle : Brooklyn Museum in association with University of Washington Press, c2011.  239pp.  Main Library E98.D9 T57 2011 : Looks at the artistry of the Native American tipi from the 1830s to today, examining the work of many different native peoples and looking at not just the structures themselves, but also the vibrantly colored furnishings, clothing and accessories that were often inside, in a book that includes nearly 200 illustrations, with 170 of them in color.

Tribal GIS : supporting Native American decision making / Anne Taylor ... [et al.], editors.  Redlands, Calif. : Esri Press, 2012.  161pp. Main Library G70.215.U6 T75 2012 : In Tribal GIS: Supporting Native American Decision Making, tribal leaders describe how their communities use enterprise geographic information systems (GIS) to address their unique challenges as sovereign Nations. This book covers applications in natural resources and the environment, transportation, cultural and historical preservation, economic development, health, education, public safety, and agriculture. Showing how tribal governments responsible for the stewardship of their land and resources and the health and well-being of their People use enterprise GIS to make decisions, Tribal GIS supports tribes new to GIS and those with GIS experience.

Trickster and hero : two characters in the oral and written traditions of the world / Harold Scheub. Madison : The University of Wisconsin Press, c2012.  223pp. Main Library GR524 .S37 2012 : The trickster and the hero, found in so many of the world’s oral traditions, are seemingly opposed but often united in one character. Trickster and Hero provides a comparative look at a rich array of world oral traditions, folktales, mythologies, and literatures—from The Odyssey, The Epic of Gilgamesh, and Beowulf to Native American and African tales. Award-winning folklorist Harold Scheub explores the “Trickster moment,” the moment in the story when the tale, the teller, and the listener are transformed: we are both man and woman, god and human, hero and villain.  Scheub delves into the importance of trickster mythologies and the shifting relationships between tricksters and heroes. He examines protagonists that figure centrally in a wide range of oral narrative traditions, showing that the true hero is always to some extent a trickster as well. The trickster and hero, Scheub contends, are at the core of storytelling, and all the possibilities of life are there: we are taken apart and rebuilt, dismembered and reborn, defeated and renewed.

Troubled trails : the Meeker affair and the expulsion of the Utes from Colorado / Robert Silbernagel ; with assistance from Jonas Grant Sr., maps by Robert Garcia.  Salt Lake City : University of Utah Press, c2011.  253pp.  Main Library E83.879 .S55 2011 : When U.S. Cavalry troops rode onto the Ute Indian Reservation in northwestern Colorado on September 29, 1879, they triggered a chain of events that cost the Utes their homeland: a deadly battle at Milk Creek, the killing of all men at the Indian agency headed by Nathan Meeker, and the taking of three women and two children who were held hostage for 23 days. The Utes didn’t seek a fight with the whites, most of whom they viewed as friends. However, powerful whites in Colorado wanted the Utes expelled. The Meeker affair was an opportunity to achieve that....In Troubled Trails, Robert Silbernagel casts new light on the story of the Meeker Affair. Using details from historical interview transcripts and newspaper articles, he reveals the personalities of the major characters—both Indian and non-Indian. He tells the story from many perspectives, including that of Indian Agent Nathan Meeker; the U.S. military; Nicaagat, a leader of the White River Utes; and Josephine Meeker, Nathan Meeker’s daughter, who was held hostage by the Utes. Silbernagel took great pains to tell a complete story, even following on horseback the trail taken by the Utes. As a result, his book paints a multifaceted picture of what took place and, most importantly, his portrayal brings the Ute side of the story into focus.

Trust in the land : new directions in tribal conservation / Beth Rose Middleton ; foreword by Clifford Trafzer.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.  322pp.  Main Library E98.L3 M53 2011 : America has always been Indian land. Historically and culturally, Native Americans have had a strong appreciation for the land and what it offers. After continually struggling to hold on to their land and losing millions of acres, Native Americans still have a strong and ongoing relationship to their homelands. The land holds spiritual value and offers a way of life through fishing, farming, and hunting. It remains essential—not only for subsistence but also for cultural continuity—that Native Americans regain rights to land they were promised....Beth Rose Middleton examines new and innovative ideas concerning Native land conservancies, providing advice on land trusts, collaborations, and conservation groups. Increasingly, tribes are working to protect their access to culturally important lands by collaborating with Native and non- Native conservation movements. By using private conservation partnerships to reacquire lost land, tribes can ensure the health and sustainability of vital natural resources. In particular, tribal governments are using conservation easements and land trusts to reclaim rights to lost acreage. Through the use of these and other private conservation tools, tribes are able to protect or in some cases buy back the land that was never sold but rather was taken from them....Trust in the Land sets into motion a new wave of ideas concerning land conservation. This informative book will appeal to Native and non-Native individuals and organizations interested in protecting the land as well as environmentalists and government agencies.

Tuscarora : a history / Anthony F.C. Wallace.  Albany : State University of New York Press, c2012.  278pp.  Main Library E99.T9 W33 2012 : This delightful book reads more like a memoir than an ethnographic history, but it is filled with great ethnographic and historical perspectives. Demonstrated in the text is a sense of humility--in essence, Wallace (emer., anthropology, Univ. of Pennsylvania) writing candidly about being corrected by community members, including his hosts. The memoir portion shows an indigenous community in transition over Wallace's lifetime, exploring and examining difficult subjects and historical perspectives through an array of voices rising to the surface that allows readers to draw conclusions. While focusing on the Tuscarora specifically, Wallace raises interesting questions about the relationships between nations of the Haudenosaunee Confederacy in both New York State and Canada, especially with regard to identification among the Tuscarora. This work reflects changes in the indigenous communities and the confederacy as well as in academia itself, attesting to a more collaborative tone and relationship. The book's price is prohibitive for students, but overall Wallace adds to the growing aggregate of Haudenosaunee cultural and historical books.

Uniting the tribes : the rise and fall of pan-Indian community on the Crow reservation / Frank Rzeczkowski.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2012.  292pp.  Main Library E99.C92 R94 2012 : Native American reservations on the Northern Plains were designed like islands, intended to prevent contact or communication between various Native peoples. For this reason, they seem unlikely sources for a sense of pan-Indian community in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries....But as Frank Rzeczkowski shows, the flexible nature of tribalism as it already existed on the Plains subverted these goals and enabled the emergence of a collective “Indian” identity even amidst the restrictiveness of reservation life. Rather than dividing people, tribalism on the Northern Plains actually served to bring Indians of diverse origins together....Tracing the development of pan-Indian identity among once-warring peoples, Rzeczkowski seeks to shift scholars’ attention from cities and boarding schools to the reservations themselves. Mining letters, oral histories, and official documents—including the testimony of native leaders like Plenty Coups and Young Man Afraid of His Horses—he examines Indian communities on the Northern Plains from 1800 to 1925. Focusing on the Crow, he unravels the intricate connections that linked them to neighboring peoples and examines how they reshaped their understandings of themselves and each other in response to the steady encroachment of American colonialism....Rzeczkowski examines Crow interactions with the Blackfeet and Lakota prior to the 1880s, then reveals the continued vitality of intertribal contact and the covert—and sometimes overt—political dimensions of “visiting” between Crows and others during the reservation era. He finds the community that existed on the Crow Reservation at the beginning of the twentieth century to be more deeply diverse and heterogeneous than those often described in tribal histories: a multiethnic community including not just Crows of mixed descent who preserved their ties with other tribes, but also other Indians who found at Crow a comfortable environment or a place of refuge. This inclusiveness prevailed until tribal leaders and OIA officials tightened the rules on who could live at—or be considered—Crow....Reflecting the latest trends in scholarship on Native Americans, Rzeczkowski brings nuance to the concept of tribalism as long understood by scholars, showing that this fluidity among the tribes continued into the early years of the reservation system. Uniting the Tribes is a groundbreaking work that will change the way we understand tribal development, early reservation life, and pan-Indian identity.

Up from these hills : memories of a Cherokee boyhood / Leonard Carson Lambert Jr. ; as told to Michael Lambert.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2011.  197pp.  Main Library E99.L26 A3 2011 : Born into a storied but impoverished family on the reservation of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Leonard Carson Lambert Jr.’s candid memoir is a remarkable story and an equally remarkable flouting of the stereotypes that so many tales of American Indian life have engendered....Up from These Hills provides a grounded, yet poignant, description of what it was like to grow up during the 1930s and 1940s in the mountains of western North Carolina and on a sharecropper’s farm in eastern Tennessee. Lambert straightforwardly describes his independent, hardworking, and stubborn parents; his colorful extended family; his eighth-grade teacher, who recognized his potential and first planted the idea that he might attend college; as well as siblings, schoolmates, and others who shaped his life. He paints a vivid picture of life on the reservation and off, documenting work, family life, education, religion, and more. Up from These Hills also tells the true story of how this family rose from depression-era poverty, a story rarely told about Indian families. With its utterly unique voice, this vivid memoir evokes an unknown yet important part of the American experience, even as it reveals the realities behind Indian experience and rural poverty in the first half of the twentieth century.

Visualities : perspectives on contemporary American Indian film and art / edited by Denise K. Cummings.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2011  243pp.  Main Library E98.A73 V57 2011 : In recent years, works by American Indian artists and filmmakers such as Jaune Quick-To-See Smith, Edgar Heap of Birds, Sherman Alexie, Shelley Niro, and Chris Eyre have illustrated the importance of visual culture as a means to mediate identity in contemporary Native America. This insightful collection of essays explores how identity is created and communicated through Native film-, video-, and art-making; what role these practices play in contemporary cultural revitalization; and how indigenous creators revisit media pasts and resignify dominant discourses through their work. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Visualities: Perspectives on Contemporary American Indian Film and Art draws on American Indian Studies, American Studies, Film Studies, Cultural Studies, Women’s Studies, and Postcolonial Studies. Among the artists examined are Hulleah J. Tsinhnahjinnie, Eric Gansworth, Melanie Printup Hope, Jolene Rickard, and George Longfish. Films analyzed include Imprint, It Starts with a Whisper, Mohawk Girls, Skins, The Business of Fancydancing, and a selection of Native Latin films.

Voices of Native American educators : integrating history, culture, and language to improve learning outcomes for Native American students / edited by Sheila T. Gregory.  Lanham, Md. : Lexington Books, c2012.  248pp.  Main Library E97 .V65 2012 : Voices of Native American Indian Educators: Integrating History, Culture, and Language to Improve Learning Outcomes for Native American Indian Students, edited by Sheila T. Gregory, provides vivid, comprehensive portraits, as well as scholarly quantitative and qualitative research, on the best practices that offer new and practical strategies for teachers to improve the academic performance of Native American Indian students. All of the contributors are Native American Indian educators who have exercised these strategies first-hand.

A wampum denied : Procter's War of 1812 / Sandy Antal. Montreal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2011. 2nd edition, 450pp.  E355.2 .A58 2011 This formative history takes a new look at a dramatic conflict-the war on the Detroit frontier in 1812-13. Powerful key players (Procter, Tecumseh and Brock), their disparate war aims, and the "all or nothing" character of the campaigns they waged still seem larger than life. Yet Sandy Antal's careful reconstruction of Native and national aspiration, vested colonial interest, and territorial aggression, reveals motives and expedients that were as often mundane as heroic. A Wampum Denied reassesses the much-maligned career of Henry Procter, commander of the British forces, traces the Canadian/British/Native side of the conflict (amid a literature dominated by the American view), and casts new light on an allied military strategy that very nearly succeeded, but when it failed, failed spectacularly.

War party in blue : Pawnee scouts in the U.S. Army / Mark Van de Logt.  Norman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2010.  Main Library E99.P3 V36 2010 : Between 1864 and 1877, during the height of the Plains Indian wars, Pawnee Indian scouts rendered invaluable service to the United States Army. They led missions deep into contested territory, tracked resisting bands, spearheaded attacks against enemy camps, and on more than one occasion saved American troops from disaster on the field of battle. In War Party in Blue, Mark van de Logt tells the story of the Pawnee scouts from their perspective, detailing the battles in which they served and recounting hitherto neglected episodes....Employing military records, archival sources, and contemporary interviews with current Pawnee tribal members some of them descendants of the scouts Van de Logt presents the Pawnee scouts as central players in some of the army's most notable campaigns. He argues that military service allowed the Pawnees to fight their tribal enemies with weapons furnished by the United States as well as to resist pressures from the federal government to assimilate them into white society....According to the author, it was the tribe's martial traditions, deeply embedded in their culture, that made them successful and allowed them to retain these time-honored traditions. The Pawnee style of warfare, based on stealth and surprise, was so effective that the scouts' commanding officers did little to discourage their methods. Although the scouts proudly wore the blue uniform of the U.S. Cavalry, they never ceased to be Pawnees. The Pawnee Battalion was truly a war party in blue.

We are an Indian nation : a history of the Hualapai people / Jeffrey P. Shepherd.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2010.  282pp. Main Library  E99.H75 S53 2010 : Though not as well known as the U.S. military campaigns against the Apache, the ethnic warfare conducted against indigenous people of the Colorado River basin was equally devastating. In less than twenty-five years after first encountering Anglos, the Hualapais had lost more than half their population and nearly all their land and found themselves consigned to a reservation....This book focuses on the historical construction of the Hualapai Nation in the face of modern American colonialism. Drawing on archival research, interviews, and participant observation, Jeffrey Shepherd describes how thirteen bands of extended families known as The Pai confronted American colonialism and in the process recast themselves as a modern Indigenous nation....Shepherd shows that Hualapai nation-building was a complex process shaped by band identities, competing visions of the past, creative reactions to modernity, and resistance to state power. He analyzes how the Hualapais transformed an externally imposed tribal identity through nationalist discourses of protecting aboriginal territory; and he examines how that discourse strengthened the Hualapais’ claim to land and water while simultaneously reifying a politicized version of their own history. Along the way, he sheds new light on familiar topics—Indian–white conflict, the creation of tribal government, wage labor, federal policy, and Native activism—by applying theories of race, space, historical memory, and decolonization....Drawing on recent work in American Indian history and Native American studies, Shepherd shows how the Hualapai have strived to reclaim a distinct identity and culture in the face of ongoing colonialism. We Are an Indian Nation is grounded in Hualapai voices and agendas while simultaneously situating their history in the larger tapestry of Native peoples’ confrontations with colonialism and modernity.

We Are Still Here : A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement.  / photographs by Dick Bancroft ; text by Laura Waterman Wittstock.  St. Paul, MN : Minnesota Historical Society Press, [2013]   210pp.  Main Library Stacks E98.T77 B35 2013 : The American Indian Movement, founded in 1968 in Minneapolis, burst into that turbulent time with passion, anger, and radical acts of resistance. Spurred by the Civil Rights movement, Native people began to protest the decades—centuries—of corruption, racism, and abuse they had endured. They argued for political, social, and cultural change, and they got attention....The photographs of activist Dick Bancroft, a key documentarian of AIM, provide a stunningly intimate view of this major piece of American history from 1970 to 1981. Veteran journalist Laura Waterman Wittstock, who participated in events in Washington, DC, has interviewed a host of surviving participants to tell the stories behind the images....The words of Russell Means, Dennis Banks, Clyde Bellecourt, Eddie Benton Banai, Pat Bellanger, Elaine Salinas, Winona LaDuke, Bill Means, Ken Tilsen, Larry Leventhal, Jose Barreiro, and others tell the stories: the takeovers of federal buildings and the Winter Dam in Wisconsin, the founding of survival schools in the Twin Cities, the Wounded Knee trials, international conferences for indigenous rights, the Trail of Broken Treaties Caravan and the Longest Walk for Survival, powwows and camps and United Nations actions. This is the inside record of a movement that began to change a nation....Dick Bancroft has been the unofficial photographer for the American Indian Movement since 1970. He has traveled the world to take these photographs. Laura Waterman Wittstock (Seneca Nation), a writer and media consultant, covered the early years of the American Indian Movement as a journalist. Rigoberta Menchú Tum, recipient of the 1992 Nobel Peace Prize, is an activist for indigenous rights in Guatemala.

We will secure our future : empowering the Navajo nation / Peterson Zah and Peter Iverson.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2012.  196pp.  Main Library E99.N3 Z34 2012 : Peterson Zah, the Navajo nation's first president and its last chairman, has made a number of important contributions toward helping American Indians have more control over their lives and their lands. He also has been extremely active in increasing the number of American Indian students enrolled in colleges and universities. In a book that is an autobiography, an interview, and a conversation combined, Iverson (emeritus, history, Arizona State U.) shares Peterson's accomplishments, vision, and motivations.

When did Indians become straight? : kinship, the history of sexuality, and native sovereignty / Mark Rifkin.  New York : Oxford University Press, 2010 [c2011].  Main Library PS173.I6 R54 2010 : When Did Indians Become Straight? explores the complex relationship between contested U.S. notions of normality and shifting forms of Native American governance and self-representation. Examining a wide range of texts (including captivity narratives, fiction, government documents, and anthropological tracts), Mark Rifkin offers a cultural and literary history of the ways Native peoples have been inserted into Euramerican discourses of sexuality and how Native intellectuals have sought to reaffirm their peoples' sovereignty and self-determination.

Where the tall grass grows : becoming indigenous and the mythological legacy of the American West / Bobby Bridger.  Golden, CO : Fulcrum Pub., c2011.  408pp.  Main Library E78.W5 B75 2011 : This interesting look at the influence of Native American spiritualism and culture on the development of "Western" identity explores the effects of this culture on a wide variety of influential characters in American culture and documents the depth of Indian themes as they spread through Western literature, popular myth and Hollywood film. Bridger is renowned cowboy poet, musician and storyteller.

Whispers of the ancients : native tales for teaching and healing in our time / by Tamarack Song and Moses (Amik) Beaver.  [Ann Arbor, Mich.] : University of Michigan Press, c2010.  196pp.  Main Library Oversize Collection, Basement Center E99.C6 S66 2010 : "It's easy to imagine yourself transported back to a time when an Elder might have told stories like those in Whispers of the Ancients around a glowing hearth. Thanks to Tamarack Song's storytelling skills, monsters, heroes, and shapeshifters come alive and open a doorway to the mysteries of life. Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It is as beautiful to read as it is to look at....Stunning Aboriginal artwork by Moses (Amik) Beaver combines with provocative storytelling to renew, in all their traditional splendor, exceptional legends from around the world. Entertaining, profound, passionate, glorious---these are stories that illustrate and evoke themes common to everyone's life, with an ancient wisdom that helps the listener to cope with today's opportunities for tenderness, grief, passion, and irony....Easily accessible to all ages, this is a book that speaks to each person at his or her own level of comprehension and need. It's as beautiful to read as it is to look at....Tamarack Song has sought out the stories of the North African and Central Asian tribal peoples from whom he is descended, and he has listened to the tales of indigenous people from the tundra to the tropics. His books include Journey to the Ancestral Self, and he has contributed to Lois Einhorn's Forgiveness and Child Abuse. He is also a counselor, wilderness skills teacher, rites-of-passage guide, and founder of the Teaching Drum Outdoor School. Song lives in the Nicolet National Forest near Three Lakes, Wisconsin....Moses (Amik) Beaver is an Ojibwe artist from the isolated fly-in community of Nibinamik (Summer Beaver), Ontario, three hundred miles north of Lake Superior. Grants from the Ontario Arts Council and other sources support his ongoing work with youth, and partial support for this book's illustrations comes from the District School Board of Nibinamik.

The White Earth nation : ratification of a native democratic constitution / Gerald Vizenor and Jill Doerfler ; introduction by David E. Wilkins.

White man's water : the politics of sobriety in a Native American community / Erica Prussing.  Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c2011.  272pp. Main Library  E99.C53 P78 2011 : This interesting anthropological study examines alcoholism and sobriety as cultural constructs within the Cheyenne Native American communities of southeastern Montana and discusses the failures of euro-centric approaches to alcohol treatment in a public health context. Working from interviews and primary ethnographic research, the volume provides a detailed look at issues such as gender and identity as root factors in cultural beliefs about sobriety and the efficacy of "white man's" methods for alcohol treatment.

Wild Frenchmen and Frenchified Indians : material culture and race in colonial Louisiana / Sophie White.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.   Also available online

The woman who loved mankind : the life of a twentieth-century Crow elder Lillian Bullshows Hogan as told to Barbara Loeb and Mardell Hogan Plainfeather.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2012.  425pp.  Main Library E99.C92 H64 2012 : The oldest living Crow at the dawn of the twenty-first century, Lillian Bullshows Hogan (1905–2003) grew up on the Crow reservation in rural Montana. In The Woman Who Loved Mankind she enthralls readers with her own long and remarkable life and the stories of her parents, part of the last generation of Crow born to nomadic ways....As a child Hogan had a miniature teepee, a fast horse, and a medicine necklace of green beads; she learned traditional arts and food gathering from her mother and experienced the bitterness of Indian boarding school. She grew up to be a complex, hard-working Native woman who drove a car, maintained a bank account, and read the local English paper but spoke Crow as her first language, practiced beadwork, tanned hides, honored clan relatives in generous giveaways, and often visited the last of the old chiefs and berdaches with her family. She married in the traditional Crow way and was a proud member of the Tobacco and Sacred Pipe societies but was also a devoted Christian who helped establish the Church of God on her reservation....Warm, funny, heartbreaking, and filled with information on Crow life, Hogan’s story was told to her daughter, Mardell Hogan Plainfeather, and to Barbara Loeb, a scholar and longtime friend of the family who recorded her words, staying true to Hogan’s expressive speaking rhythms with its echoes of traditional Crow storytelling.

Wounded Knee Massacre / Martin Gitlin.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2011.  185pp.  E83.89 .G58 2011  Online : While this reference for students in high school and up looks at factors that led to the Wounded Knee massacre in South Dakota, overviewing the relations between white settlers, the US government, and the Plains Indian in the 18th and 19th centuries, the focus is on the events of the massacre itself. Material is organized chronologically, from the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876 to the slaughter of 300 Lakota Sioux at Wounded Knee in 1890. The book closes with an examination of the massacre's legacy, including a discussion of the Native American siege of Wounded Knee in 1973. Reference material includes a timeline of Native American-US government relations, biographies of key figures, excerpts from primary documents (organized chronologically), and a glossary of Sioux terms as well as places and legislation, plus an annotated bibliography.

Wounded Knee : party politics and the road to an American massacre / Heather Cox Richardson. New York : Basic Books, c2010.  363pp.  Main Library E83.89 .R53 2010 : On December 29, 1890, American troops massed around hundreds of Lakota Sioux men, women, and children near Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota. Outnumbered and demoralized, the Sioux posed no threat to the soldiers---but in a chaotic scene, the soldiers opened fire, killing nearly 300 Sioux in what would become known as the Wounded Knee Massacre. As acclaimed historian Heather Cox Richardson shows, the massacre grew out of a set of political forces all too familiar to us today: fierce partisanship, heated political rhetoric, and an irresponsible, profit-driven media....Richardson traces the story back to the struggles of a country divided between rich and poor, East and West, Republicans and Democrats. In the desperate midterm election battle of 1890, lawmakers in Washington set the stage for mass murder by exploiting an age-old political tool---fear. Democrats accused Republicans of dangerously mismanaging the Indian reservations, starving the Sioux for political gain. Republicans countered that the Indians were well cared for, but their savage barbarism made them a danger to white settlers. Tensions---among politicians determined to win an election, army officers ordered to prevent a nonexistent "uprising," and starving Indians forced into an alien economy---erupted in gunfire on December 29....Wounded Knee asks an obvious question. Why were soldiers in South Dakota in the first place, when there had been no lives lost and no property taken in the alleged Sioux uprising? The answers are ingrained in the American political system itself, and Wounded Knee's lessons stretch into the present. This compelling narrative offers the definitive account of a quintessential American tragedy.

X-marks : native signatures of assent / Scott Richard Lyons.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, 2010.  220pp.  Main Library E98.E85 L96 2010 : During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, North American Indian leaders commonly signed treaties with the European powers and the American and Canadian governments with an X, signifying their presence and assent to the terms. These x-marks indicated coercion (because the treaties were made under unfair conditions), resistance (because they were often met with protest), and acquiescence (to both a European modernity and the end of a particular moment of Indian history and identity)....In X-Marks, Scott Richard Lyons explores the complexity of contemporary Indian identity and current debates among Indians about traditionalism, nationalism, and tribalism. Employing the x-mark as a metaphor for what he calls the “Indian assent to the new,” Lyons offers a valuable alternative to both imperialist concepts of assimilation and nativist notions of resistance, calling into question the binary oppositions produced during the age of imperialism and maintaining that indigeneity is something that people do, not what they are. Drawing on his personal experiences and family history on the Leech Lake Ojibwe Reservation in northern Minnesota, discourses embedded in Ojibwemowin (the Ojibwe language), and disagreements about Indian identity within Native American studies, Lyons contends that Indians should be able to choose nontraditional ways of living, thinking, and being without fear of being condemned as inauthentic....Arguing for a greater recognition of the diversity of Native America, X-Marks analyzes ongoing controversies about Indian identity, addresses the issue of culture and its use and misuse by essentialists, and considers the implications of the idea of an Indian nation. At once intellectually rigorous and deeply personal, X-Marks holds that indigenous peoples can operate in modern times while simultaneously honoring and defending their communities, practices, and values.

Yellow dirt : an American story of a poisoned land and a people betrayed / Judy Pasternak. New York : Free Press, 2010.  317pp. Main Library Stacks E99.N3 P378X 2010 : Atop a craggy mesa in the northern reaches of the Navajo reservation lies what was once a world-class uranium mine called Monument No.2 Discovered in the 1940s---during the government's desperate press to build nuclear weapons---the mesa's tremendous lode would forever change the lives of the hundreds of Native Americans who labored there and of their families, including many who dwelled in the valley below for generations afterward....Yellow Dirt offers readers a window into a dark chapter of modern history that still reverberates today. From the 1940s into the early twenty-first century, the United States knowingly used and discarded an entire tribe for the sake of atomic bombs. Secretly, during the days of the Manhattan Project and then in a frenzy during the Cold War, the government bought up all the uranium that could be mined from the hundreds of rich deposits entombed under the sagebrush plains and sandstone cliffs. Despite warnings from physicians and scientists that long-term exposure could be harmful, even fatal, thousands of miners would work there unprotected. A Second set of warnings emerged about the environmental impact. Yet even now, long after the uranium boom ended, and long after national security could be cited as a consideration, many residents are still surrounded by contaminated air, water, and soil. The radioactive "yellow dirt" has ended up in their drinking supplies, in their walls and floors, in their playgrounds, in their bread ovens, in their churches, and even in their garbage dumps. And they are still dying....Transporting readers into a little-known country-within-a-country, award-winning journalist Judy Pasternak gives rare voice to Navajo perceptions of the world, their own complicated involvement with uranium mining, and their political coming-of-age. Along the way, their fates intertwine with decisions made in Washington, D. C., in the Navajo capital of Window Rock, and in the Western Border towns where swashbuckling mining men trained their sights on the fortunes they could wrest from tribal land, successfully pressuring the government into letting them do it their way....Yellow Dirt powerfully chronicles both a scandal of neglect and the Navajos' long fight for justice. Few had heard of this shameful legacy until Pasternak revealed it in a prize-winning Los Angeles Times series that galvanized a powerful congressman and a famous prosecutor to press for redress and repair of the grievous damage. In this expanded account, she provides gripping new details, weaving the personal and the political into a tale of betrayal, of willful negligence, and, ultimately, of reckoning. 

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Book Covers, R-S


Red brethren : the Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the problem of race in early America

Red brethren : the Brothertown and Stockbridge Indians and the problem of race in early America


Red medicine : traditional indigenous rites of birthing and healing

Red medicine : traditional indigenous rites of birthing and healing


Red power rising : the National Indian Youth Council and the origins of Native Activism

Red power rising : the National Indian Youth Council and the origins of Native Activism


Reimagining Indian country : native American migration & identity in twentieth-century Los Angeles

Reimagining Indian country : native American migration & identity in twentieth-century Los Angeles


Religious transformation in the late pre-Hispanic Pueblo world

Religious transformation in the late pre-Hispanic Pueblo world


Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907

Remaining Chickasaw in Indian Territory, 1830s-1907


Removable type : histories of the book in Indian country, 1663-1880

Removable type : histories of the book in Indian country, 1663-1880


Reservation "capitalism" : economic development in Indian country

Reservation


Reservation reelism : redfacing, visual sovereignty, and representations of Native Americans in film

Reservation reelism : redfacing, visual sovereignty, and representations of Native Americans in film


Rez life : an Indian's journey through reservation life

Rez life : an Indian's journey through reservation life


Rich Indians : Native people and the problem of wealth in American history

Rich Indians : Native people and the problem of wealth in American history


Roanoke : solving the mystery of the Lost Colony

Roanoke : solving the mystery of the Lost Colony


Savage anxieties : the invention of western civilization

Savage anxieties : the invention of western civilization


The Second Creek War : interethnic conflict and collusion on a collapsing frontier

The Second Creek War : interethnic conflict and collusion on a collapsing frontier


Seneca possessed : Indians, witchcraft, and power in the early American republic

Seneca possessed : Indians, witchcraft, and power in the early American republic


A separate country : postcoloniality and American Indian nations

A separate country : postcoloniality and American Indian nations


Sequoyah and the invention of the Cherokee alphabet

Sequoyah and the invention of the Cherokee alphabet


Shapeshifting : transformations in Native American art

Shapeshifting : transformations in Native American art


Short nights of the Shadow Catcher : the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis

Short nights of the Shadow Catcher : the epic life and immortal photographs of Edward Curtis

Sitting Bull, Prisoner of War

Sitting Bull, Prisoner of War


Slavery in Indian country : the changing face of captivity in early America

Slavery in Indian country : the changing face of captivity in early America


Smoke signals : the native takeback of North America's tobacco industry

Smoke signals : the native takeback of North America's tobacco industry


Spanish attempts to colonize southeast North America, 1513-1587

Spanish attempts to colonize southeast North America, 1513-1587


Sustaining the Cherokee family : kinship and the allotment of an indigenous nation

Sustaining the Cherokee family : kinship and the allotment of an indigenous nation


Book Covers, T-Z


The taking of American Indian lands in the Southeast : a history of territorial cessions and forced relocation, 1607-1840

The taking of American Indian lands in the Southeast : a history of territorial cessions and forced relocation, 1607-1840


Telling stories in the face of danger : language renewal in Native American communities

Telling stories in the face of danger : language renewal in Native American communities


Thinking in Indian : a John Mohawk reader

Thinking in Indian : a John Mohawk reader


Three Fires unity : the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron borderlands

Three Fires unity : the Anishnaabeg of the Lake Huron borderlands


A thrilling narrative of Indian captivity : dispatches from the Dakota War

A thrilling narrative of Indian captivity : dispatches from the Dakota War


Tipi : heritage of the Great Plains

Tipi : heritage of the Great Plains


Tribal GIS : supporting Native American decision making

Tribal GIS : supporting Native American decision making


Trickster and hero : two characters in the oral and written traditions of the world

Trickster and hero : two characters in the oral and written traditions of the world


Troubled trails : the Meeker affair and the expulsion of the Utes from Colorado

Troubled trails : the Meeker affair and the expulsion of the Utes from Colorado


Trust in the land : new directions in tribal conservation

Trust in the land : new directions in tribal conservation


Uniting the tribes : the rise and fall of pan-Indian community on the Crow reservation

Uniting the tribes : the rise and fall of pan-Indian community on the Crow reservation


Up from these hills : memories of a Cherokee boyhood

Up from these hills : memories of a Cherokee boyhood


Visualities : perspectives on contemporary American Indian film and art

Visualities : perspectives on contemporary American Indian film and art


Voices of Native American educators : integrating history, culture, and language to improve learning outcomes for Native American students

Voices of Native American educators : integrating history, culture, and language to improve learning outcomes for Native American students


A wampum denied : Procter's War of 1812

A wampum denied : Procter's War of 1812


War party in blue : Pawnee scouts in the U.S. Army

War party in blue : Pawnee scouts in the U.S. Army


We are an Indian nation : a history of the Hualapai people

We are an Indian nation : a history of the Hualapai people


We Are Still Here : A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement

We Are Still Here : A Photographic History of The American Indian Movement


We will secure our future : empowering the Navajo nation

We will secure our future : empowering the Navajo nation


When did Indians become straight? : kinship, the history of sexuality, and native sovereignty

When did Indians become straight? : kinship, the history of sexuality, and native sovereignty


Where the tall grass grows : becoming indigenous and the mythological legacy of the American West

Where the tall grass grows : becoming indigenous and the mythological legacy of the American West


Whispers of the ancients : native tales for teaching and healing in our time

Whispers of the ancients : native tales for teaching and healing in our time


White man's water : the politics of sobriety in a Native American community

White man's water : the politics of sobriety in a Native American community


The woman who loved mankind : the life of a twentieth-century Crow elder Lillian Bullshows Hogan as told to Barbara Loeb and Mardell Hogan Plainfeather

The woman who loved mankind : the life of a twentieth-century Crow elder Lillian Bullshows Hogan


Wounded Knee Massacre

p>Wounded Knee Massacre


Wounded Knee : party politics and the road to an American massacre

Wounded Knee : party politics and the road to an American massacre


X-marks : native signatures of assent

X-marks : native signatures of assent


Yellow dirt : an American story of a poisoned land and a people betrayed

Yellow dirt : an American story of a poisoned land and a people betrayed


Michigan State University