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Michigan State University

African American Studies Research Guide: New Books

Contents

A compilation of recent African American acquisitions by the MSU Libraries.

General Tips and Advice

  • Check the MSU Online Catalog for books, videos, and more.  Note that the MSU Online Catalog is a union catalog which includes the holdings of the Library of Michigan, the MSU College of Law Library, and other branches on our own campus.

  • Do a wider search using MelCat (a  network of participating Michigan libraries) or WorldCat (searches thousands of libraries). You can request non-MSU Library materials through interlibrary loan. NOTE: Not all materials listed in MelCat or WorldCat can be borrowed through interlibrary loan, but many can.

  • Don't forget to use the bibliographies in reference works, books, and articles to identify other resources on your topic.

Book Covers, A-C


African American Folktales

African American Folktales


African American Journalists : Autobiography as Memoir and Manifesto

African American journalists : autobiography as memoir and manifesto


African American Urban History Since World War II

African American urban history since World War II


African Americans and Community Engagement in Higher Education : Community Service, Service-Learning, and Community-Based Research

African Americans and community engagement in higher education : community service, service-learning, and community-based research


African Americans Confront Lynching : Strategies of Resistance From the Civil War to the Civil Rights Era

African Americans Confront Lynching : Strategies of Resistance From the Civil War to the Civil Rights Era


African Americans in the West

African Americans in the West


Africana Cultures and Policy Studies : Scholarship and the Transformation of Public Policy

Africana Cultures and Policy Studies : Scholarship and the Transformation of Public Policy


The Age of Jim Crow : a Norton Casebook in History

The Age of Jim Crow : a Norton Casebook in History


The American Optic : Psychoanalysis, Critical Race Theory, and Richard Wright

The American optic : psychoanalysis, critical race theory, and Richard Wright


Babylon girls : black women performers and the shaping of the modern

Babylon girls : black women performers and the shaping of the modern


Baldwin's Harlem : a biography of James Baldwin

Baldwin's Harlem : a biography of James Baldwin


Barack Obama and African American Empowerment : the Rise of Black America's New Leadership

Barack Obama and African American Empowerment : the Rise of Black America's New Leadership


The Best Kept Secret : Single Black Fathers

The Best Kept Secret : Single Black Fathers


Beyond Lift Every Voice and Sing : the Culture of Uplift, Identity, and Politics in Black Musical Theater

Beyond Lift every voice and sing : the culture of uplift, identity, and politics in black musical theater


Beyond the Black Lady : Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class

Beyond the Black lady : sexuality and the new African American middle class


Black Culture and the New Deal : the Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era

Black Culture and the New Deal : the Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era


Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton

Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton


Black Men Can't Shoot

Black men can't shoot


Black Pain : It Just Looks Like We're Not Hurting : Real Talk For When There's Nowhere to Go But Up

Black pain : it just looks like we're not hurting : real talk for when there's nowhere to go but up


Black protest and the great migration : a brief history with documents

Black protest and the great migration : a brief history with documents


Black Walden : Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts

Black Walden : Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts


Bloody Lowndes : civil rights and Black power in Alabama's Black Belt

Bloody Lowndes : civil rights and Black power in Alabama's Black Belt


Booker T. Washington : Black Leadership in the Age of Jim Crow

Booker T. Washington : Black Leadership in the Age of Jim Crow


The Breakthrough : Politics and Race in the Age of Obama

The Breakthrough : Politics and Race in the Age of Obama


Calling Out Liberty : the Stono Slave Rebellion and the Universal Struggle for Human Rights

Calling Out Liberty : the Stono Slave Rebellion and the Universal Struggle for Human Rights


The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass

The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass


Captain "Hell Roaring" Mike Healy : From American Slave to Arctic Hero

Captain


Cathy Williams : From Slave to Buffalo Soldier

Cathy Williams : From Slave to Buffalo Soldier


Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African American Literary History

Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African American Literary History


Civil Rights Movement : People and Perspectives

Civil Rights Movement : People and Perspectives


The Colored cartoon : Black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954

The Colored cartoon : Black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954


Contemporary African American women playwrights : a casebook

Contemporary African American women playwrights : a casebook


Coretta Scott King : a Biography

Coretta Scott King : a Biography


Cotton and Race in the Making of America : the Human Costs of Economic Power

Cotton and Race in the Making of America : the Human Costs of Economic Power


Criminal Injustice : Slaves and Free Blacks in Georgia's Criminal Justice System

Criminal Injustice : Slaves and Free Blacks in Georgia's Criminal Justice System


Book Covers, D-F


The Day Freedom Died : the Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction

The Day Freedom Died : the Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction


Death or Liberty : African Americans and Revolutionary America

Death or Liberty : African Americans and Revolutionary America


Deans and truants : race and realism in African American literature

Deans and truants : race and realism in African American literature


Devil's Sanctuary : an Eyewitness History of Mississippi Hate Crimes

Devil's Sanctuary : an Eyewitness History of Mississippi Hate Crimes


Digging : the Afro-American Soul of American Classical Music

Devil's Sanctuary : an Eyewitness History of Mississippi Hate Crimes


Dreaming Blackness : Black Nationalism and African American Public Opinion

Dreaming Blackness : Black Nationalism and African American Public Opinion


Dred Scott's Revenge : a Legal History of Race and Freedom in America

Dred Scott's Revenge : a Legal History of Race and Freedom in America


Encyclopedia of African American Artists

Encyclopedia of African American Artists


Erasing Racism : The Survival of the American Nation

Erasing Racism : The Survival of the American Nation


Extending the Diaspora : New Histories of Black People

Extending the Diaspora : New Histories of Black People


A Faithful Account of the Race : African American Historical Writing in Nineteenth-Century America

A Faithful Account of the Race : African American Historical Writing in Nineteenth-Century America


Family Properties : Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America

Family Properties : Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America


A Fatherless Child : Autobiographical Perspectives on African American Men

A Fatherless Child : Autobiographical Perspectives on African American Men


Fighting for Democracy : Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South

Fighting for Democracy : Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South


The First Black President : Barack Obama, Race, Politics, and the American Dream

The First Black President : Barack Obama, Race, Politics, and the American Dream


Freedom By Any Means : Con Games, Voodoo Schemes, True Love and Lawsuits on the Underground Railroad

Freedom By Any Means : Con Games, Voodoo Schemes, True Love and Lawsuits on the Underground Railroad


Freedom Facts and Firsts : 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience

Freedom Facts and Firsts : 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience


Freedom Struggles : African Americans and World War I

Freedom Struggles : African Americans and World War I


Freedom's Teacher : the Life of Septima Clark

Freedom's Teacher : the Life of Septima Clark


From slavery to poverty : the racial origins of welfare in New York, 1840-1918

From slavery to poverty : the racial origins of welfare in New York, 1840-1918


From Toussaint to Tupac : the Black International Since the Age of Revolution

From Toussaint to Tupac : the Black International Since the Age of Revolution


Featured Books, A-B

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

African American Folktales / edited by Thomas A. Green.  Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009.  176pp.  Main Library GR111.A47 A37 2009 : African American culture has a rich tradition of folktales. Written for students and general readers, this volume gathers a sampling of the most important African American folktales. Included are nearly 50 tales grouped in thematic chapters on origins; heroes, heroines, villains, and fools; society and conflict; and the supernatural. Each tale begins with an introductory headnote, and the book closes with a selected, general bibliography. Students learning about literature and language will gain a greater understanding of African American oral traditions, while social studies students will learn more about African American culture.

African American Journalists : Autobiography as Memoir and manifesto / Calvin L. Hall.  Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2009.  117pp.  Main Library PS366.A35 H35 2009  : Contents - Introduction: "unexamined lives" : the study of African American journalism autobiography -- Journalism : memory, history, and context -- Form, function, and the public sphere in Jill Nelson's Volunteer slavery -- Volunteer slavery and the speech aspects of the autobiographical manifesto -- Surveillance and performance in Nathan McCall's Makes me wanna holler -- Jake Lamar, Patricia Raybon, and the autobiographical manifesto form -- Memoir and the African American newsroom experience : themes and considerations -- Conclusion: the synergy between race, class, gender, and profession in African American journalists' autobiographies.

African American Urban History Since World War II / edited by Kenneth L. Kusmer and Joe W. Trotter.  Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009.  536pp.  Main Library E185.61 .A2393 2009 : Historians have devoted surprisingly little attention to African American urban history of the postwar period, especially compared with earlier decades. Correcting this imbalance, African American Urban History since World War II features an exciting mix of seasoned scholars and fresh new voices whose combined efforts provide the first comprehensive assessment of this important subject.  The first of this volume’s five groundbreaking sections focuses on black migration and Latino immigration, examining tensions and alliances that emerged between African Americans and other groups. Exploring the challenges of residential segregation and deindustrialization, later sections tackle such topics as the real estate industry’s discriminatory practices, the movement of middle-class blacks to the suburbs, and the influence of black urban activists on national employment and social welfare policies. Another group of contributors examines these themes through the lens of gender, chronicling deindustrialization’s disproportionate impact on women and women’s leading roles in movements for social change. Concluding with a set of essays on black culture and consumption, this volume fully realizes its goal of linking local transformations with the national and global processes that affect urban class and race relations.

African Americans and Community Engagement in Higher Education : Community Service, Service-Learning, and Community-Based Research / edited by Stephanie Y. Evans ... [et al.].  Albany : State University of New York Press, 2009.  263pp.  Main Library LC220.5 .A48 2009 : This book discusses race and its roles in university-community partnerships. The contributors take a collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multiregional approach that allows students, agency staff, community constituents, faculty, and campus administrators an opportunity to reflect on and redefine what impact African American identity--in the academy and in the community--has on various forms of community engagement. From historic concepts of "race uplift" to contemporary debates about racialized perceptions of need, they argue that African American identity plays a significant role. In representing best practices, recommendations, personal insight, and informed warnings about building sustainable and mutually beneficial relationships, the contributors provide a cogent platform from which to encourage the difficult and much-needed inclusion of race in dialogues of national service and community engagement.

African Americans Confront Lynching : Strategies of Resistance From the Civil War to the Civil Rights Era / Christopher Waldrep. Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2009. 201pp.  Main Library HV6457 .W347 2009 : This book examines African Americans' strategies for resisting white racial violence from the Civil War until the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968, and on into the Clinton era. Christopher Waldrep's semi-biographical approach to the pioneers in the antilynching campaign portrays African Americans as active participants in the effort to end racial violence rather than as passive victims. A rich selection of documents helps give the story a sense of immediacy.

African Americans in the West / Douglas Flamming.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : ABC-CLIO, c2009.  353pp.  Main Library E185.925 .F536 2009  : Based on the latest research, this work provides a new look at the lives of African Americans in the Western United States, from the colonial era to the present.

African Americans on the Great Plains : an Anthology / edited and with an introduction by Bruce A. Glasrud and Charles A. Braithwaite.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2009.  395pp.  Main Library E185.925 .A56 2009  : Until recently, histories of the American West gave little evidence of the presence—let alone importance—of African Americans in the unfolding of the western frontier. There might have been a mention of Estevan, slavery, or the Dred Scott decision, but the rich and varied experience of African Americans on the Great Plains went largely unnoted. This book, the first of its kind, supplies that critical missing chapter in American history.  Originally published over the span of twenty-five years in Great Plains Quarterly, the essays collected here describe the part African Americans played in the frontier army and as homesteaders, community builders, and activists. The authors address race relations, discrimination, and violence. They tell of the struggle for civil rights and against Jim Crow, and they examine African American cultural growth and contributions as well as economic and political aspects of black life on the Great Plains. From individuals such as “Pap” Singleton, Era Bell Thompson, Aaron Douglas, and Alphonso Trent; to incidents at Fort Hays, Brownsville, and Topeka; to defining moments in government, education, and the arts—this collection offers the first comprehensive overview of the black experience on the Plains.

African Women Immigrants in the United States : Crossing Transnational Borders / John A. Arthur. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  230pp. Main Library E184.A24 A73 2009 : Depicts how immigrant women use international migration as a strategy to challenge existing patriarchal hegemonies operative both in the United States and Africa. It also weaves together the multidimensional strands of how African immigrant women shape and are shaped by the process of international migration.

Africana Cultures and Policy Studies : Scholarship and the Transformation of Public Policy / edited by Zachery Williams.  New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  281pp.  Main Library E185.86 .A338 2009 : This book introduces Africana Cultures and Policy Studies as an interdisciplinary field, rooted in the historical experience of people of African descent. Intentionally, these essays seek to canonize Africana historical studies for the purposes of policy development, analysis, and practical application. Africana Cultures and Policy Studies calls for a relocation and synthesis of policy-derived research emanating from public and private culture spheres. In the process, its goal is to use history and culture to engage the policy process from a top-down and bottom-up approach, thereby dissolving the previously impenetrable divides between theory and practice, academics and policymakers, and community constituencies and related social/civic institutions.

The Age of Jim Crow : a Norton Casebook in History / [compiled by] Jane Dailey.  New York : W.W. Norton & Co., c2009.  434pp.  Main Library E185.61 .D23 2009 : America's racial history has been marked by both hard-won progress and sudden reversals of fortune.  In The Age of Jim Crow, Jane Dailey introduces readers to a fascinating collection of documents on race and segregation in America that were created between the end of the Civil War and the emergence of the Civil Rights Movement a century later.  Organized around two themes, Dailey highlights the role of law in creating, maintaining, and -- ultimately -- helping to undo segregation.   She also traces the effects of interracial sex and marriage as they shaped the era of Jim Crow.  The Age of Jim Crow focuses throughout on sexuality and gender politics as they play out across the legal, social and economic, political, and cultural arenas.

The American Optic : Psychoanalysis, Critical Race Theory, and Richard Wright / Mikko Tuhkanen.  Albany : State University of New York Press, c2009.  229pp.  Main Library E185.6 .T84 2009 : "The American Optic makes a very significant contribution to the discussion about the intersection of psychoanalysis and race. The author stages a provocative and illuminating dialogue between various psychoanalytic theories (primarily those of Lacan) and various African-American literary and cultural texts (particularly the novels of Richard Wright)."

Babylon girls : black women performers and the shaping of the modern / Jayna Brown.  Durham : Duke University Press, 2008.  339pp.  Main Library PN2286 .B76 2008 : Babylon Girls is a groundbreaking cultural history of the African American women who performed in variety shows--chorus lines, burlesque revues, cabaret acts, and the like--between 1890 and 1945. Through a consideration of the gestures, costuming, vocal techniques, and stagecraft developed by African American singers and dancers, Jayna Brown explains how these women shaped the movement and style of an emerging urban popular culture. In an era of U.S. and British imperialism, these women challenged and played with constructions of race, gender, and the body as they moved across stages and geographic space. They pioneered dance movements including the cakewalk, the shimmy, and the Charleston--black dances by which the "New Woman" defined herself. These early-twentieth-century performers brought these dances with them as they toured across the United States and around the world, becoming cosmopolitan subjects more widely traveled than many of their audiences....From the well-known performers Ada Overton Walker and Josephine Baker to lesser-known artists such as Belle Davis and Valaida Snow, Brown weaves the histories of specific singers and dancers together with incisive theoretical insights. She describes the strange phenomenon of blackface performances by women, both black and white, and she considers how black expressive artists navigated racial segregation. Fronting the "picaninny choruses" of African American child performers who toured Britain and the Continent in the early 1900s, and singing and dancing in The Creole Show (1890), Darktown Follies (1913), and Shuffle Along (1921), black women variety-show performers of the early twentieth century paved the way for later generations of African American performers. Brown shows not only how these artists influenced transnational ideas of the modern woman but also how their artistry was an essential element in the development of jazz.

Baldwin's Harlem : a biography of James Baldwin / by Herb Boyd.  New York : Atria Books, 2008. 244pp.  Main Library PS3552.A45 Z7597 2008 : Perhaps no other writer is as synonymous with Harlem as James Baldwin (1924-1987). The events there that shaped his youth greatly influenced Baldwin's work, much of which focused on his experiences as a black man in white America. Go Tell it on the Mountain, The Fire Next Time, Notes of a Native Son, and Giovanni's Room are just a few of his classic fiction and nonfiction books that remain an essential part of the American canon. In Baldwin's Harlem, Herb Boyd combines impeccable biographical research with astute literary criticism, and reveals to readers Baldwin's association with Harlem on both metaphorical and realistic levels. For example, Boyd describes Baldwin's relationship with Harlem Renaissance poet laureate Countee Cullen, who taught Baldwin French in the ninth grade. Packed with telling anecdotes, Baldwin's Harlem illuminates the writer's diverse views and impressions of the community that would remain a consistent presence in virtually all of his writing.

Barack Obama and African American Empowerment : the Rise of Black America's New Leadership / Manning Marable and Kristen Clarke, Editors.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  269pp.  Main Library E185.615 .B2855 2009 : Examines the evolution of black leadership and politics since the Civil Rights Movement. It looks at the phenomenon of Barack Obama, from his striking emergence as a successful candidate for the Illinois State Senate to President of the United States, as part of the continuum of African American political leaders. The reader also examines the evolving ideals about the roles of government and the economy in addressing the historic disadvantages experienced by many African Americans. Here, some of the nation's most influential intellectuals bring together original scholarship to look at the future of national politics and American race relations.

The Best Kept Secret : Single Black Fathers / Roberta L. Coles.  Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2009.  169pp.  Main Library HQ759.915 .C65 2009 : Sociologist Coles (Marquette Univ.) reports a case study of 20 single custodial fathers. The men are heads of households under different conditions. For example, one single father is openly gay, some have been married only once, others have never married, and others are single custodial fathers of nonbiological and biological children. The book contains seven chapters detailing attitudes of the men on subjects like parental standards, gender of children, and teaching children about racial identity, and the author's policy recommendations. There is little science in the book, but it provides a sensitizing moment despite its tendency to frame each theme within pedestrian US values. For example, the text stresses freedom of choice among the men. There is little attention to the limitations of choice. For this reason, the book has wide appeal for uncritical or one-dimensional thought. Coles should be commended for her tenacity to interpret some black male experiences with rearing children.

Between Barack and a Hard Place : Racism and White Denial in the Age of Obama / Tim Wise.  San Francisco : City Lights Books, c2009.  159pp.  Main Library  E184.A1 W57 2009 : Race is, and always has been, an explosive issue in the United States. In this timely new book, Tim Wise explores how Barack Obama’s emergence as a political force is taking the race debate to new levels. According to Wise, for many white people, Obama’s rise signifies the end of racism as a pervasive social force; they point to Obama not only as a validation of the American ideology that anyone can make it if they work hard, but also as an example of how institutional barriers against people of color have all but vanished. But is this true? And does a reinforced white belief in color-blind meritocracy potentially make it harder to address ongoing institutional racism? After all, in housing, employment, the justice system, and education, the evidence is clear: white privilege and discrimination against people of color are still operative and actively thwarting opportunities, despite the success of individuals like Obama....Is black success making it harder for whites to see the problem of racism, thereby further straining race relations, or will it challenge anti-black stereotypes to such an extent that racism will diminish and race relations improve? Will blacks in power continue to be seen as an “exception” in white eyes? Is Obama “acceptable” because he seems “different from most blacks,” who are still viewed too often as the dangerous and inferior “other”?

Beyond Black and White : Transforming African-American Politics / Manning Marable.  London [England] ; New York : Verso, 2009.  2nd ed., 319pp.  Main Library E185.615 .M277 2009 :   Despite the recent surge of interest in the notion of a “post-racial America,” the pursuit of racial equality and social justice for African-Americans seems more elusive than ever. In this new paperback edition, Manning Marable updates his classic work with a substantial new introduction encompassing his views on recent African-American politics and struggles against racism. In doing so, he brings new significance to his claim for the necessity of a “transformationist” approach for moving “beyond black and white.”

Beyond Lift Every Voice and Sing : the Culture of Uplift, Identity, and Politics in Black Musical Theater / Paula Marie Seniors.  Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2009.  292pp.  Fine Arts Music Book Collection ML1711 .S46 2009 : Paula Marie Seniors’s Beyond Lift Every Voice and Sing is an engaging and well-researched book that explores the realities of African American life and history as refracted through the musical theater productions of one of the most prolific black song-writing teams of the early twentieth century. James Weldon Johnson, J. Rosamond Johnson, and Bob Cole combined conservative and progressive ideas in a complex and historically specific strategy for overcoming racism and its effects. In Shoo Fly Regiment (1906–1908) and The Red Moon (1908–1910), theater, uplift, and politics collided as the team tried to communicate a politics of uplift, racial pride, gender equality, and interethnic coalitions. The overarching question of this study is how roles and representations in black musical theater both reflected and challenged the dominant social order. While some scholars dismiss the team as conformists, Seniors’s contention is that they used the very tools of hegemony to make progressive political statements and to create a distinctly black theater informed by black politics, history, and culture. These men were writers, musicians, actors, and vaudevillians who strove to change the perception of African Americans on stage from one of minstrelsy buffoonery to one of dignity and professionalism.

Beyond the Black Lady : Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class  / Lisa B. Thompson. Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2009.  183pp.  Main Library E185.86 .T447 2009 : Lisa B. Thompson explores the representation of black middle class female sexuality by African American women authors in narrative literature, drama, film, and popular culture, showing how these depictions reclaim black female agency and illustrate the difficulties black women confront in asserting sexual agency in the public sphere. Thompson broadens the discourse around black female sexuality by offering an alternate reading of the overly determined racial and sexual script that casts the middle class "black lady" as the bastion of African American propriety. Drawing on the work of black feminist theorists, she examines symptomatic autobiographies, novels, plays, and key episodes in contemporary American popular culture, including works by Anita Hill, Judith Alexa Jackson, P. J. Gibson, Julie Dash, Kasi Lemmons, Jill Nelson, Lorene Cary, and Andrea Lee.

Black and Green : Black Insights for the Green Movement / Jamal Ali.  Lanham : Hamilton Books, c2009.  71pp.  Main Library GE195.7 .A45 2009 : This book is a call to action for the Black community to join the green movement. The book offers insights, ideas, and strategies that demonstrate how Black people can benefit from and fuel the go-green effort.

Black Culture and the New Deal : the Quest for Civil Rights in the Roosevelt Era / Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2009.  312pp.  Main Library E185.6 .S62 2009 : In the 1930s, the Roosevelt administration-unwilling to antagonize a powerful southern congressional bloc-refused to endorse legislation that openly sought to improve political, economic, and social conditions for African Americans. Instead, as historian Lauren Rebecca Sklaroff shows, the administration recognized and celebrated African Americans by offering federal support to notable black intellectuals, celebrities, and artists....Sklaroff illustrates how programs within the Federal Arts Projects and several war agencies gave voice to African Americans such as Lena Horne, Joe Louis, Duke Ellington, and Richard Wright, as well as lesser-known figures. She argues that these New Deal programs represent a key moment in the history of American race relations, as the cultural arena provided black men and women with unique employment opportunities and new outlets for political expression. Equally important, she contends that these cultural programs were not merely an attempt to appease a black constituency but were also part of the New Deal's larger goal of promoting a multiracial nation. Yet, while federal projects ushered in creativity and unprecedented possibilities, they were subject to censorship, bigotry, and political machinations....With numerous illustrations, Black Culture and the New Deal offers a fresh perspective on the New Deal's racial progressivism and provides a new framework for understanding black culture and politics in the Roosevelt era.

Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Clinton / Duchess Harris.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. 190pp.  Main Library E185.86 .H36 2009 : Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book analyzes Black women's involvement in American political life, focusing on what they did to gain political power between 1961 and 2001, and why, in many cases, they did not succeed. Harris demonstrates that Black women have tried to gain centrality through their participation in Presidential Commissions, Black feminist organizations, theatrical productions, film adaptations of literature, beauty pageants, electoral politics, and Presidential appointments. Harris contends that 'success' in this area means that the feminist-identified Black women in the Congressional Black Caucus who voted against Clarence Thomas's appointment would have spoken on behalf of Anita Hill; Senator Carol Moseley Braun would have won re-election; Lani Gunier would have had a hearing; Dr. Joycelyn Elders would have maintained her post; and Congresswoman Barbara Lee wouldn't have stood alone in her opposition to the Iraq war resolution.

Black Men Can't Shoot / Scott N. Brooks.  Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, c2009.  228pp.  Main Library GV885.73.P55 B76 2009 : The myth of the natural black athlete is widespread, though it’s usually only talked about when a sports commentator or celebrity embarrasses himself by bringing it up in public. Those gaffes are swiftly decried as racist, but apart from their link to the long history of ugly racial stereotypes about black people—especially men—they are also harmful because they obscure very real, hard-fought accomplishments. As Black Men Can’t Shoot demonstrates, such successes on the basketball court don’t just happen because of natural gifts—instead, they grow out of the long, tough, and unpredictable process of becoming a known player.

Black Middle Class Delinquents / Connie R. Hassett-Walker.  El Paso : LFB Scholarly Pub., 2009.  231pp.  Main Library HV9104 .H34 2009 : Most criminal justice research on African Americans focuses on poor Blacks living in poor Black communities. Hassett-Walker expands this focus to middle class blacks and empirically tests an assertion from Pattillo-McCoy (1999)'s Black Picket Fences i.e., that little difference in delinquency exists between poor versus middle class Black youth using two national probability samples. Independent variables included class status, parent-child interaction, and neighborhood poverty. Parenting behavior and marital disruption were both predictive of delinquency. Having delinquent peers predicted future arrest, suggesting support for differential association theory. Implications for future research, criminal justice coursework, and government funding are discussed.

Black Pain : It Just Looks Like We're Not Hurting : Real Talk For When There's Nowhere To Go But Up / Terrie M. Williams.  New York : Scribner, 2008.  333pp.  Main Library RC451.5.N4 W55 2008 : A successful woman entrepreneur addresses the taboo of depression that pervades African-American culture, drawing on her own experiences of suffering and recovery while offering advice on how to overcome cycles of denial and psychological pain.

Black protest and the great migration : a brief history with documents / Eric Arnesen.  Boston : Bedford/St. Martin's, c2003.  226pp.  Main Library E185.6 .A76 2003 : During World War I, as many as half a million southern African Americans permanently left the South to create new homes and lives in the urban North, and hundreds of thousands more would follow in the 1920s. This dramatic transformation in the lives of many black Americans involved more than geography: the increasingly visible “New Negro” and the intensification of grassroots black activism in the South as well as the North were the manifestations of a new challenge to racial subordination. Eric Arnesen’s unique collection of articles from a variety of northern, southern, black, and white newspapers, magazines, and books explores the “Great Migration,” focusing on the economic, social, and political conditions of the Jim Crow South, the meanings of race in general — and on labor in particular — in the urban North, the grassroots movements of social protest that flourished in the war years, and the postwar “racial counterrevolution.” An introduction by the editor, headnotes to documents, a chronology, questions for consideration, a bibliography, and an index are included.

Black Religion and the Imagination of Matter in the Atlantic World / James A. Noel.  New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  231pp.  Main Library Main Library BL2400 .N64 2009 : This book situates the study of Black Religion within the modern temporal and historical structures whose geographical contours are the Atlantic World. It describes how black people and Black Religion made a phenomenological appearance in modernity simultaneously and were signified in the identity formation of whites and their religion. James A. Noel accounts for these new identity formations, religious-social practices, and their accompanying epistemological orientations by describing the non-reciprocal contacts and exchanges from which ensued new modes of materiality and imagining matter. Black Religion is shown to represent an alternative epistemological mode of imagining matter and a critique of both white Christianity and the Enlightenment.

Black Walden : Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts / Elise Lemire.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009.  232pp.  Main Library F74.C8 L46 2009 : Concord, Massachusetts, has long been heralded as the birthplace of American liberty and American letters. It was here that the first military engagement of the Revolutionary War was fought and here that Thoreau came to "live deliberately" on the shores of Walden Pond. Between the Revolution and the settlement of the little cabin with the bean rows, however, Walden Woods was home to several generations of freed slaves and their children. Living on the fringes of society, they attempted to pursue lives of freedom, promised by the rhetoric of the Revolution, and yet withheld by the practice of racism. Thoreau was all but alone in his attempt "to conjure up the former occupants of these woods." Other than the chapter he devoted to them in Walden, the history of slavery in Concord has been all but forgotten....In Black Walden: Slavery and Its Aftermath in Concord, Massachusetts, Elise Lemire brings to life the former slaves of Walden Woods and the men and women who held them in bondage during the eighteenth century. After charting the rise of Concord slaveholder John Cuming, Black Walden follows the struggles of Cuming's slave, Brister, as he attempts to build a life for himself after thirty-five years of enslavement. Brister Freeman, as he came to call himself, and other of the town's slaves were able to leverage the political tensions that fueled the American Revolution and force their owners into relinquishing them. Once emancipated, however, the former slaves were permitted to squat on only the most remote and infertile places. Walden Woods was one of them. Here, Freeman and his neighbors farmed, spun linen, made baskets, told fortunes, and otherwise tried to survive in spite of poverty and harassment....Today Walden Woods is preserved as a place for visitors to commune with nature. Lemire, who grew up two miles from Walden Pond, reminds us that this was a black space before it was an internationally known green space. Black Walden preserves the legacy of the people who strove against all odds to overcome slavery and segregation.

Bloody Lowndes : civil rights and Black power in Alabama's Black Belt / Hasan Kwame Jeffries.  New York : New York University Press, c2009.  348pp.  Main Library E185.93.A3 J44 2009 : Lowndes County, Alabama, is well-known for its inglorious contributions to white repression, brutality, and murder of blacks in the Deep South during the civil rights era. Jeffries (Ohio State Univ.) examines the topic more thoroughly and in greater depth than any previous study, pressing the narrative back to Reconstruction but focusing most of his narrative and analysis on the mid-1960s and 1970s. The research is wide-ranging and in great depth, both in archival and oral history sources. For this reader, there needed to be a clearer and fuller explanation of the uniqueness of white brutality and racial repression in Lowndes County: was it really any different from the rest of Alabama and much of Mississippi? Other topics that Jeffries could have explored further include connections between Black Power and Black Panthers in Alabama and similar phenomena in western and northern areas of the US, and a stronger concluding analytical section that makes sense of the seemingly endless struggles for power between whites and blacks. The larger historical significance seems sometimes obscured in the detail of back and forth local politics. But make no mistake about it: this book is a needed and important addition to the historiography of the Civil Rights Movement.

Booker T. Washington : Black Leadership in the Age of Jim Crow / Raymond W. Smock. Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, c2009.  233pp.  Main Library E185.97.W4 S667 2009 : Interprets the life of Booker T. Washington, exploring his rise from slavery to become an influential educator and African American leader.

The Breakthrough : Politics and Race in the Age of Obama / Gwen Ifill.  New York : Doubleday, c2009.  277pp.  Main Library E185.615 .I34 2009  : Veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama’s stunning presidential victory and introducing the emerging young African American politicians forging a bold new path to political power....Ifill argues that the Black political structure formed during the Civil Rights movement is giving way to a generation of men and women who are the direct beneficiaries of the struggles of the 1960s. She offers incisive, detailed profiles of such prominent leaders as Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, and U.S. Congressman Artur Davis of Alabama (all interviewed for this book), and also covers numerous up-and-coming figures from across the nation. Drawing on exclusive interviews with power brokers such as President Obama, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vernon Jordan, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, his son Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., and many others, as well as her own razor-sharp observations and analysis of such issues as generational conflict, the race/ gender clash, and the "black enough" conundrum, Ifill shows why this is a pivotal moment in American history....The Breakthrough is a remarkable look at contemporary politics and an essential foundation for understanding the future of American democracy in the age of Obama.

Featured Books, C-D

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

Calling Out Liberty : the Stono Slave Rebellion and the Universal Struggle for Human Rights / Jack Shuler.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2009.  217pp.  Main Library F279.S84 S48 2009  : Contents - Carolina's colonial architecture and the age of rights -- Dissension in the ranks : regarding, evaluating, and revealing slavery in eighteenth-century America -- Claiming rights : the Stono rebels strike for liberty -- Negro acts : communication and African American declarations of independence -- The heirs of Jemmy : slave rebels in nineteenth-century African American fiction -- Plantation traditions : racism and the transformation of the Stono narrative -- Doin' de right : the persistence of the Stono narrative.

The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass / edited by Maurice S. Lee.  Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  192pp.  Main Library E449.D75 C36 2009 : Frederick Douglass was born a slave and lived to become a best-selling author and a leading figure of the abolitionist movement. A powerful orator and writer, Douglass provided a unique voice advocating human rights and freedom across the nineteenth century, and remains an important figure in the fight against racial injustice. This Companion, designed for students of American history and literature, includes essays from prominent scholars working in a range of disciplines. Key topics in Douglass studies - his abolitionist work, oratory, and autobiographical writings - are covered in depth, and new perspectives on religion, jurisprudence, the Civil War, romanticism, sentimentality, the Black press, and transatlanticism are offered. Accessible in style, and representing new approaches in literary and African-American studies, this book is both a lucid introduction and a contribution to existing scholarship.

Captain "Hell Roaring" Mike Healy : From American Slave to Arctic Hero / Dennis L. Noble and Truman R. Strobridge ; foreword by Gene Allen Smith and James C. Bradford.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2009.  326pp.  Main Library HJ6647.H43 N63 2009 :

Captive Passage : the Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the AmericasWashington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution Press, c2002.  208pp.  Main Library HT1322 .C35 2002 : Contents - Human commerce / Edward Reynolds -- Africa : the source / John Thornton -- The Middle Passage / Colin A. Palmer -- The Henrietta Marie / Madeleine H. Burnside -- The African disapora : resistance and survival / Linda M. Heywood -- Life in the New World / Philip D. Morgan -- Struggles for freedom / James Brewer Stewart -- Black sailors making selves / W. Jeffrey Bolster.

Captives as Commodities: the Transatlantic Slave Trade / Lisa A. Lindsay.  Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Prentice Hall, c2008.  174pp.  Main Library HT1321 .L56 2008  : Contents - Why did Europeans buy African slaves? -- Why did Africans sell slaves? -- How did enslaved people cope? -- How did the slave trade end?

Cathy Williams : From Slave to Buffalo Soldier / Phillip Thomas Tucker.  Mechanicsburg, PA : Stackpole Books, c2002. 258pp.  Main Library E185.97.W694 T83 2002 : Military historian Tucker uses the story of Cathy Williams, aka Pvt. William Cathay, an African American woman who enlisted in the 38th US Infantry as a man, to tell the story of one of the six African American units (known as Buffalo Soldiers) organized after the Civil War. Although the major source for Cathy Williams's life is only a brief newspaper interview, Tucker expands her story by presenting the history of Company A from 1866 to 1868. He presents her point of view by using accounts from other women who disguised themselves as men in order to serve in the military. After the Union Army occupied Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1861, the 8th Indiana Regiment took Cathy Williams, who was then a slave, as contraband and pressed her into service as a laundress and cook. She stayed in that capacity for more than three years until the end of the war, when she decided to enlist. Tucker follows her post-Army life to Trinidad, Colorado, where Williams supported herself as a laundress and seamstress until her health failed. Despite her years of service, Williams was denied a pension, and she died in poverty. The book will appeal to readers interested in military, African American, and women's history.

Chaotic Justice: Rethinking African American Literary History / John Ernest.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 2009.  316pp.  Main Library PS153.N5 E75 2009 : What is African American about African American literature? Why identify it as a distinct tradition? John Ernest contends that too often scholars have relied on naive concepts of race, superficial conceptions of African American history, and the marginalization of important strains of black scholarship. With this book, he creates a new and just retelling of African American literary history that neither ignores nor transcends racial history....Ernest revisits the work of nineteenth-century writers and activists such as Henry "Box" Brown, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Wilson, William Wells Brown, and Sojourner Truth, demonstrating that their concepts of justice were far more radical than those imagined by most white sympathizers. He sheds light on the process of reading, publishing, studying, and historicizing this work during the twentieth century. Looking ahead to the future of the field, Ernest offers new principles of justice that grant fragmented histories, partial recoveries, and still-unprinted texts the same value as canonized works. His proposal is both a historically informed critique of the field and an invigorating challenge to present and future scholars.

Civil Rights Movement : People and Perspectives / Michael Ezra, editor.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : ABC-CLIO, c2009.  250pp.  Main Library E185.61 .C6167 2009 : Ezra's contribution to ABC-CLIO's "Perspectives in American Social History" series is a lucid, balanced examination of the lasting effects of the civil rights movement. Noted academics, including Ezra himself, have penned eight chapters, each focusing on a key element of the civil rights movement: "Early Pioneers"; "Student Activists"; "Religion and Clergy"; "Southern Civil Rights Organizations"; "Organizations Outside the South: NAACP and CORE"; "Black Nationalists"; "The Black Panther Party"; and "Women." Each chapter is illustrated with archival photographs and contains biographies of seminal figures such as Elijah Muhammad, Whitney Young, and Fanny Lou Hamer. Notable is the exploration of often-overlooked topics, e.g., the antipoverty outreach efforts of the much-maligned Black Panthers and the role of women as leaders within the movement. The book opens with brief biographies of the contributors, followed by an informative chronology that opens a few months shy of Brown v. Board of Education, and concludes in 1975. A boon for researchers, one-third of the book is dedicated to supplementary material: primary documents, a 15-page glossary, and a substantial 52-page bibliography. Numerous other titles explore the impact of the civil rights movement. Few do so with the breadth of Ezra's work. Bruce J. Dierenfield's The Civil Rights Movement focuses on responses to everyday racism, while Peter J. Ling's Gender and the Civil Rights Movement examines the role of women more closely than Ezra's work.

The Colored cartoon : Black representation in American animated short films, 1907-1954 / Christopher P. LehmanAmherst : University of Massachusetts Press, c2007.  137pp.  Main Library and Special Collections, Comic Art Collection NC1766.U5 L442 2007 : From the earliest days of animated films, black people were portrayed in grossly exaggerated caricatures that derived from the 19th-century minstrel shows. Lehman (ethnic studies, St. Cloud State University) traces these as a reflection of societal attitudes in the first half of the 20th century. Part of this book is a chronicle of how animators were made aware of the offensiveness of this and slowly, encouraged to drop the negative stereotypes. But Lehman also investigates more subtle African-American influences in cartoons, from jazz as background music to the inspiration for Bugs Bunny in Brer Rabbit. Although the book is not illustrated with examples, the author refers the reader to websites with examples of the animation.

Contemporary African American women playwrights : a casebook / edited by Philip Kolin.  London ; New York : Routledge, 2007.  207pp.  Main Library PS338.N4 C66 2007 : In the last fifty years, American and World theatre has been challenged and enriched by the rise to prominence of numerous female African American dramatists. Contemporary African American Women Playwrights is the first critical volume to explore the contexts and influences of these writers, and their exploration of black history and identity through a wealth of diverse, courageous and visionary dramas.  Kolin compiles a wealth of new essays, comprising:

  • Yale scholar David Krasner on the dramatic legacy of Lorraine Hansberry, Zora Neale Hurston, Marita Bonner and Georgia Douglas Johnson
  • individual chapters devoted to: Alice Childress, Sonia Sanchez, Adrienne Kennedy, Ntozake Shange, Pearl Cleage, Aishah Rahman, Glenda Dickerson, Anna Deavere Smith and Suzan Lori-Parks
  • an essay and accompanying interview with Lynn Nottage
  • comprehensive discussion of attendant theatrical forms, from choreopoems and surrealistic plays, to documentary theatre and civil rights dramas, and their use in challenging racial and gender hierarchies.

Continuing Perspectives on the Black Diaspora / edited with introductions by Aubrey W. Bonnett and Calvin B. Holde.  Lanham : University Press of America, c2009.  263pp.  Main Library CB235 .E47 2009 : This volume investigates the often-overlooked African presence in Asia, determining how many of these diasporic populations fared in the context of political independence, globalization / economic marginalization, and the presence of ethnic conflict and institutional racism, even with positive class formations and declining significance of race in other geographical areas.

Coretta Scott King : a Biography / Laura T. McCarty.  Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009.  160pp.  Main Library E185.97.K47 M387 2009 : Coretta Scott was committed to social justice long before she met and married Martin Luther King, Jr. She shared in all the dangers that King's prominence in the civil rights movement brought, and she saw herself as full partner in the movement. Yet she generally remained in the background, supporting King's work and caring for their children, until his assassination transformed her into a movement leader in her own right: founder of the King Center, leader of a mass demonstration for a renewed national commitment to nonviolent social change, force behind the establishment of the national holiday bearing her husband's name. This book follows the trajectory of Coretta Scott King's tumultuous life at the heart of the most important American social movement of the 20th century.

Cotton and Race in the Making of America : the Human Costs of Economic Power / Gene Dattel.  Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, 2009. 416pp.  Main Library E441 .D237 2009 : Two themes, one explicit, one implicit, compete in this exploration of the link between the development of American capitalism and the devastation of the African-American community. The price of cotton as the “determinant of America's destiny, influencing and even overcoming individual will and ethical behavior” is the fully explicit one. In treating it, Dattel (The Sun Never Rose), formerly a managing director at Salomon Brothers and Morgan Stanley, offers an economic history of cotton. The book's chronological path absorbs the creation of the Confederacy, the waging of the Civil War, Reconstruction, the rise of the Klan, the development of sharecropping, the displacement of black labor by machine and the falling price of cotton. The secondary and competing theme is Northern complicity in the slave trade, the cotton economy, segregation, racism and the development of the “black underclass in the North and South, with its destructive behavioral characteristics.” The economic slant leads to interesting tables and statistics concerning fluctuations in the price of cotton, but for serious readers, the usefulness of Dattel's work is diminished by his heavy reliance on secondary sources and casual documentation.

Criminal Injustice : S laves and Free Blacks in Georgia's Criminal Justice System / Glenn McNair.  Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009.  234pp.  Main Library HV9955.G4 M36 2009 : Contents - "My Lord, they are stark mad after Negroes" : slavery and the corruption of Georgia's legal culture -- "For the better ordering and governing Negroes" : Blacks and the law -- "Negroes might cut the throats of our people" : Black crime and its causes -- "Some convenient method and form of tryal" : the trial process -- "The slave should look to his master and the courts to avenge his wrongs" : the appellate process -- "May the Lord have mercy on his soul" : punishment.

Dan Burley's Jive / edited by Thomas Aiello.  DeKalb, Ill. : Northern Illinois University Press, 2009.  232pp.  Main Library PE3727.N4 B87 2009 : The book combines into one easily accessible volume two works: Dan Burley's Original Handbook of Harlem Jive and Diggeth Thou?

The Day Freedom Died : the Colfax Massacre, the Supreme Court, and the Betrayal of Reconstruction / Charles Lane.  New York : Henry Holt and Co., 2008.  326pp.  Main Library F379.C59 L36 2008 : Following the Civil War, Colfax, Louisiana, was a town, like many, where Negroes and whites mingled uneasily. But on April 13, 1873, a small army of white ex-Confederate soldiers, enraged after attempts by freedmen to assert their new rights, killed more than sixty Negroes who had occupied a courthouse. Now, journalist Charles Lane transforms this nearly forgotten incident into a historical saga. Seeking justice for the slain, one brave U.S. attorney, James Beckwith, risked his life and career to investigate and punish the perpetrators--but they all went free. What followed was a series of courtroom dramas that culminated at the Supreme Court, where the verdict compromised the victories of the Civil War and left Southern blacks at the mercy of violent whites for generations.

Deans and truants : race and realism in African American literature / Gene Andrew Jarrett.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2007.  223pp.  Main Library PS153.N5 J395 2007 : For a work to be considered African American literature, does it need to focus on black characters or political themes? Must it represent these within a specific stylistic range? Or is it enough for the author to be identified as African American? In Deans and Truants, Gene Andrew Jarrett traces the shifting definitions of African American literature and the authors who wrote beyond those boundaries at the cost of critical dismissal and, at times, obscurity. From the late nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth, de facto deans—critics and authors as different as William Howells, Alain Locke, Richard Wright, and Amiri Baraka—prescribed the shifting parameters of realism and racial subject matter appropriate to authentic African American literature, while truant authors such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, George S. Schuyler, Frank Yerby, and Toni Morrison—perhaps the most celebrated African American author of the twentieth century—wrote literature anomalous to those standards....Jarrett explores the issues at stake when Howells, the "Dean of American Letters," argues in 1896 that only Dunbar's "entirely black verse," written in dialect, "would succeed." Three decades later, Locke, the cultural arbiter of the Harlem Renaissance, stands in contrast to Schuyler, a journalist and novelist who questions the existence of a peculiarly black or "New Negro" art. Next, Wright's 1937 blueprint for African American writing sets the terms of the Chicago Renaissance, but Yerby's version of historical romance approaches race and realism in alternative literary ways. Finally, Deans and Truants measures the gravitational pull of the late 1960s Black Aesthetic in Baraka's editorial silence on Toni Morrison's first and only short story, "Recitatif."...Drawing from a wealth of biographical, historical, and literary sources, Deans and Truants describes the changing notions of race, politics, and gender that framed and were framed by the authors and critics of African American culture for more than a century.

Death or Liberty : African Americans and Revolutionary America / Douglas R. Egerton.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  342pp.  Main Library E269.N3 E35 2009 : In Death or Liberty, Douglas R. Egerton offers a sweeping chronicle of African American history stretching from Britain's 1763 victory in the Seven Years' War to the election of slaveholder Thomas Jefferson as president in 1800.,,,While American slavery is usually identified with the cotton plantations, Egerton shows that on the eve of the Revolution it encompassed everything from wading in the South Carolina rice fields to carting goods around Manhattan to serving the households of Boston's elite. More important, he recaptures the drama of slaves, freed blacks, and white reformers fighting to make the young nation fulfill its republican slogans. Although this struggle often unfolded in the corridors of power, Egerton pays special attention to what black Americans did for themselves in these decades, and his narrative brims with compelling portraits of forgotten figures such as Quok Walker, a Massachusetts runaway who took his master to court and thereby helped end slavery in that state; Absalom Jones, a Delaware house slave who bought his freedom and later formed the Free African Society; and Gabriel, a young Virginia artisan who was hanged for plotting to seize Richmond and hold James Monroe hostage. Egerton argues that the Founders lacked the courage to move decisively against slavery despite the real possibility of peaceful, if gradual, emancipation. Battling ouge odds, African American activists and rebels succeeded in finding liberty--if never equality--only in northern states.,,,Canvassing every colony and state, as well as incorporating the wider Atlantic world, Death or Liberty offers a lively and comprehensive account of black Americans and the Revolutionary era in America.,,,"Now, for the first time, the scores of recent investigations of black participation in the American Revolution have been synthesized into an elegant and seamless narrative. In Death or Liberty...Douglas Egerton shows that African Americans not only extracted the most liberty from the Revolutionary experience but also paid the highest price for it."

Devil's Sanctuary : an Eyewitness History of Mississippi Hate Crimes / Alex A. Alston, Jr. and James L. Dickerson.  Chicago, Ill. : Lawrence Hill Books, c2009.  369pp.  Main Library HV6773.53.M7 A47 2009 : Recalling the state’s shameful racist history of lynching, arson, denial of rights, false imprisonment, and other heinous crimes, this riveting narrative explores how Mississippi became a safe haven for the most violent and virulent racists, who were immune to prosecution for their crimes. This sanctuary of the then status quo emerged from the 1956 Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission’s efforts to preserve segregation and "Mississippi Values" by declaring the state outside the jurisdiction of the federal government. Analysis of the major crimes, the institutional collusion, delayed and never-delivered justice, and the state's attempts at atonement are interspersed with the authors' recollections of what they saw, heard, and experienced as whites—thus "insiders"—during this troubled time. With commentary extending to the present day, this is both a well-researched history and an eyewitness record of living through an era of judicial, media, and economic terrorism directed against African Americans.

Digging : the Afro-American Soul of American Classical Music / Amiri Baraka.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2009.  414pp.  Fine Arts, Music Collection ML3556 .B1612 2009 : For almost half a century, Amiri Baraka has ranked among the most important commentators on African American music and culture. In this brilliant assemblage of his writings on music, the first such collection in nearly twenty years, Baraka blends autobiography, history, musical analysis, and political commentary to recall the sounds, people, times, and places he's encountered. As in his earlier classics, Blues People and Black Music, Baraka offers essays on the famous--Max Roach, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, John Coltrane--and on those whose names are known mainly by jazz aficionados--Alan Shorter, Jon Jang, and Malachi Thompson. Baraka's literary style, with its deep roots in poetry, makes palpable his love and respect for his jazz musician friends. His energy and enthusiasm show us again how much Coltrane, Albert Ayler, and the others he lovingly considers mattered. He brings home to us how music itself matters, and how musicians carry and extend that knowledge from generation to generation, providing us, their listeners, with a sense of meaning and belonging.

Disturbing the Peace : Black Culture and the Police Power After Slavery / Bryan Wagner.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  307pp. Main Library E185.86 .W334 2009 : W. C. Handy waking up to the blues on a train platform, Buddy Bolden eavesdropping on the drums at Congo Square, John Lomax taking his phonograph recorder into a southern penitentiary—some foundational myths of the black vernacular remain inescapable, even as they come under increasing pressure from skeptics.  In Disturbing the Peace, Bryan Wagner revises the history of the black vernacular tradition and gives a new account of black culture by reading these myths in the context of the tradition’s ongoing engagement with the law. Returning to some familiar examples (trickster tales, outlaw legends, blues lyrics) central to previous studies of the black vernacular expression, Wagner uses an analytic framework he has developed from the historical language of the law to give new and surprising analyses. Wagner’s work draws both on his deep understanding of history and on a wealth of primary sources that range from novels to cartoons to popular ballads and early blues songs to newspapers and court reports. Through his innovative engagement with them, Wagner gives us a new and deeper understanding of black cultural expression, revealing its basis in the relational workings of African Americans in the social world.

Divine Discontent : the Religious Imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois / Jonathon S. Kahn Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  183pp.  Main Library E185.97.D73 K34 2009 : W. E. B. Du Bois is an improbable candidate for a project in religion. His skepticism of and, even, hostility toward religion is readily established and canonically accepted. Indeed, he spent his career rejecting normative religious commitments to institutions and supernatural beliefs. In this book, Jonathon Kahn offers a fresh and controversial reading of Du Bois that seeks to overturn this view. Kahn contends that the standard treatment of Du Bois turns a deaf ear to his writings. For if we're open to their religious timbre, those writings-from his epoch-making The Souls of Black Folk to his unstudied series of parables that depict the lynching of an African American Christ-reveal a virtual obsession with religion. Du Bois's moral, literary, and political imagination is inhabited by religious rhetoric, concepts and stories. Divine Discontent recovers and introduces readers to the remarkably complex and varied religious world in Du Bois's writings. It's a world of sermons, of religious virtues such as sacrifice and piety, of jeremiads that fight for a black American nation within the larger nation. Unlike other African American religious voices at the time, however, Du Bois's religious orientation is distinctly heterodox--it exists outside the bounds of institutional Christianity. Kahn shows how Du Bois self-consciously marshals religious rhetoric, concepts, typologies, narratives, virtues, and moods in order to challenge traditional Christian worldview in which events function to confirm a divine order. Du Bois's antimetaphysical religious voice, he argues, places him firmly in the American tradition of pragmatic religious naturalism typified by William James. This innovative reading of Du Bois should appeal to scholars of American religion, intellectual history, African American Studies, and philosophy of religion.

Dreaming Blackness : Black Nationalism and African American Public Opinion / Melanye T. Price. New York : New York University Press, c2009.  226pp. Main Library E185.625 .P74 2009 : Black Nationalism is one of the oldest and most enduring ideological constructs developed by African Americans to make sense of their social and political worlds. In Dreaming Blackness, Melanye T. Price explores the current understandings of Black Nationalism among African Americans, providing a balanced and critical view of today's black political agenda. She argues that Black Nationalism continues to enjoy moderate levels of support by most black citizens but has a more difficult time gaining a larger stronghold because of increasing diversity among blacks and a growing emphasis on individualism over collective struggle. She shows that black interests are a dynamic negotiation among various interested groups and suggests that those differences are not just important for the "black agenda" but also for how African Americans think and dialogue about black political questions daily....Using a mix of everyday talk and impressive statistical data to explain contemporary black opinions, Price highlights the ways in which Black Nationalism works in a "post-racial" society. Ultimately, Price offers a multilayered portrait of African American political opinions, providing a new understanding of race specific ideological views and their impact on African Americans, persuasively illustrating that Black Nationalism is an ideology that scholars and politicians should not dismiss.

Dred Scott's Revenge : a Legal History of Race and Freedom in America / Andrew P. Napolitano.  Nashville, Tenn. : Thomas Nelson, c2009.  288pp.  Gast Business Library KF4755 .N37 2009  : Contents - Slavery comes to the new world -- American slavery -- Ratifying and interpreting the Constitution -- Dred Scott and the Missouri compromise -- The Civil War -- Abraham Lincoln and human freedom -- Reconstruction : military rule in the post-Civil War South -- Jim Crow -- The federal government orchestrates racism -- Black education in the South and the end of Jim Crow after Brown v. Board of Education -- The civil rights legislation of the 1960s and afterward -- How Democrats and Republicans use racial rhetoric to get elected -- Justice and law enforcement -- Baseball.

Featured Books, E-G

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

The Education of a Black Radical : a Southern Civil Rights Activist's Journey, 1959-1964 / D'Army Bailey with Roger Easson ; foreword by Nikki Giovanni.   Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, c2009.  237pp.  Main Library E185.97.B15 A3 2009 : Bailey offers a personal story of his life as a cog in what we have come to know as the civil rights movement. His book isn't a tour of the familiar triumphs and tragedies in places like Greensboro, Selma, Montgomery, Birmingham and Little Rock. Instead, it is the tale of lesser-known battles that made the movement a movement. It is also a revealing story of one man's awakening to the call of his times.

Encyclopedia of African American Artists / Dele Jegede.  Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, c2009.  293pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Reference N6538.N5 J44 2009 : African American heritage is rich with stories of family, community, faith, love, adaptation and adjustment, grief, and suffering, all captured in a variety of media by artists intimately familiar with them. From traditional media of painting and artists such as Horace Pippin and Faith Ringgold, to photography of Gordon Parks, and new media of Sam Gilliam and Martin Puryear (installation art), the African American experience is reflected across generations and works. Eight pages of color plates and black and white images throughout the book introduce both favorite and new artists to students and adult readers alike.

The End of White World Supremacy : Black Internationalism and the Problem of the Color Line / Roderick D. Bush.  Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2009. 258pp.  Main Library E185.61 .B975 2009  : Contents - Introduction: "The handwriting on the wall" -- The peculiar internationalism of black nationalism -- The sociology of the color line : W.E.B. Du Bois and the end of white world supremacy -- The class-first, race-first debate : the contradictions of nationalism and internationalism and the stratification of the world-system -- Black feminism, intersectionality, and the critique of masculinist models of liberation -- The civil rights movement and the continuing struggle for the redemption of America -- Black power, the American dream, and the spirit of bandung : Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., in the age of world revolution.

Erasing Racism : The Survival of the American Nation / Molefi Kete Asante.  Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2009.  370pp.  Main Library E185.615 .A8 2009 : Asante  documents the continuing racism in the US and warns of its effect on the country and its people. His topics include the tortured dream, the mythic condition, the wilderness of racial discontent, race and the religion situation, the furious passage, and the national survival. To the 2002 first edition he has added a new introduction on the impact of Barack Obama's election as US president.

Extending the Diaspora : New Histories of Black People / edited by Dawne Y. Curry, Eric D. Duke, and Marshanda A. Smith ; forward by Darlene Clark Hine.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2009.  306pp.  Main Library DT16.5 .E95 2009 : This groundbreaking collection addresses both new and familiar topics with fresh perspectives to produce original and thought-provoking scholarship on the diasporic histories of black peoples. Through a variety of methodologies and theoretical constructs, the contributors plumb a wide range of localities to engage many important subjects, including slavery and emancipation, transnational and diasporic experiences, social and political activism, and political and cultural identity. In doing so, they offer insightful and thought provoking studies, highlight new areas of inquiry in the African diaspora, and in many cases transcend geographical and national boundaries. The probing and meticulously woven narratives of this collection combine to show the vibrant histories of peoples of African descent.

Faith Makes Us Live : Surviving and Thriving in the Haitian Diaspora / Margarita A. Mooney.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2009.  296pp.  Main Library BX1695.H2 M66 2009 : Based on fieldwork in Haiti and in three cities of the Haitian diaspora--Miami, Montreal, and Paris--this study offers a vivid portrait of the power of faith for immigrants. Drawing on extensive interviews and including rich details of everyday life, Margarita Mooney explores the struggles and joys of Haitian Catholics in these three very different cities. She finds that religious narratives, especially those about transformation and redemption, provide real meaning and hope in what are often difficult conditions. However, Mooney also finds that successful assimilation into the larger society varies from country to country, having less to do with these private religious beliefs than on cooperation between religious and government leaders. In the United States, the Catholic Church is able to offer services and advocacy that help immigrants succeed, but it is not able to do the same in France or Canada. Presenting a powerful picture of traditional Catholic piety that overturns many assumptions about Vodou practice in Haitian Catholicism, this work also provides a groundbreaking comparative perspective on how immigrants' experiences and opportunities vary greatly across different nations.

A Faithful Account of the Race : African American Historical Writing in Nineteenth-Century America / Stephen G. Hall.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  334pp. Main Library E184.65 .H35 2009  :  Contents - Troubling the pages of historians : African American intellectuals and historical writing in the early republic, 1817-1837 -- To present a just view of our origin : creating an African American historical discourse, 1837-1850 -- The destiny of the colored people : African American history between compromise and jubilee, 1850-1863 -- The historical mind of emancipation : writing African American history at the dawn of freedom, 1863-1882 -- Advancement in numbers, knowledge, and power : African American history in post-reconstruction America, 1883-1915 -- To smite the rock of knowledge : the Black academy and the professionalization of history.

Family Properties : Race, Real Estate, and the Exploitation of Black Urban America / Beryl Satter.  New York : Metropolitan Books, 2009.  495pp.  HD7288.76.U52 C434 2009 : The "Promised Land" for thousands of Southern blacks, postwar Chicago quickly became the most segregated city in the North, the site of the nation's worst ghettos and the target of Martin Luther King Jr.'s first campaign beyond the South. In this powerful book, Beryl Satter identifies the true causes of the city's black slums and the ruin of urban neighborhoods throughout the country: not, as some have argued, black pathology, the culture of poverty, or white flight, but a widespread and institutionalized system of legal and financial exploitation.
In Satter's account of a city in crisis, unscrupulous lawyers, slumlords, and speculators are pitched against religious reformers, community organizers, and an impassioned attorney - the author's father, Mark J. Satter - who launched a crusade against the profiteers. At the heart of the struggle stand the black migrants who, having left the South with its legacy of sharecropping, suddenly find themselves caught in a new kind of debt peonage. Satter shows the interlocking forces at work in their oppression: the discriminatory practices of the banking industry, the federal policies that created the country's shameful "dual housing market," the economic anxieties that fueled white violence, and the tempting profits to be made by preying on the city's most vulnerable population.

A Fatherless Child : Autobiographical Perspectives on African American Men / Tara T. Green.  Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2009.  172pp.  Main Library HQ756.8 .G74 2009 : Examining the works of Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Malcolm X, and Barack Obama, Green portrays the intersecting experiences of generations of black men during the twentieth century both before and after the civil rights movement, revealing the impact of fatherlessness on racial and gender identity formation

Fighting for Democracy : Black Veterans and the Struggle Against White Supremacy in the Postwar South / Christopher S. Parker.  Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, c2009.  266pp.  Main Library E185.61 .P25 2009 : Fighting for Democracy shows how the experiences of African American soldiers during World War II and the Korean War influenced many of them to challenge white supremacy in the South when they returned home. Focusing on the motivations of individual black veterans, this groundbreaking book explores the relationship between military service and political activism. Christopher Parker draws on unique sources of evidence, including interviews and survey data, to illustrate how and why black servicemen who fought for their country in wartime returned to America prepared to fight for their own equality.Parker discusses the history of African American military service and how the wartime experiences of black veterans inspired them to contest Jim Crow. Black veterans gained courage and confidence by fighting their nation's enemies on the battlefield and racism in the ranks. Viewing their military service as patriotic sacrifice in the defense of democracy, these veterans returned home with the determination and commitment to pursue equality and social reform in the South. Just as they had risked their lives to protect democratic rights while abroad, they risked their lives to demand those same rights on the domestic front.Providing a sophisticated understanding of how war abroad impacts efforts for social change at home, Fighting for Democracy recovers a vital story about black veterans and demonstrates their distinct contributions to the American political landscape.

The First Black President : Barack Obama, Race, Politics, and the American Dream / Johnny Bernard Hill.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  198pp.  Main Library E908 .H55 2009 : The First Black President is a critical and passionate reflection on the political and historical implications of an Obama administration concerning the issue of race in America.  Obama’s rise to political power has forever changed the contours of race relations in the country as many hail the new age of a “post-racial” society.  Yet, an Obama presidency could further complicate real racial progress and could set race relations back in the country for decades to come if not viewed in the proper context.  The book demonstrates that the Obama presidency must be celebrated as a historical triumph based on America’s racist past, but also the struggle for equality, justice and freedom must also intensify with recognition of its global consequences.  The problem of race in America no longer just affects American citizens but impacts cultures around the globe. The book speaks to both optimists and pessimists alike who are struggling to understand how race factors into the domestic and international policy agenda of Obama who now sits in the highest seat of political and global power.

Freedom By Any Means : Con Games, Voodoo Schemes, True Love and Lawsuits on the Underground Railroad / Betty DeRamus.  New York : Atria Books, 2009.  305pp.  Main Library E450 .D473 2009 : "Much of what we think we know about African American history isn't completely true," says Betty DeRamus in the introduction to Freedom by Any Means...."According to the usual story, slaves gained their freedom by running away, being freed by their owners, buying their way out of bondage or having someone else buy them. But how do we account for people like John Bowley, who bluffed his and his family's way to freedom, or Althea Lynch, whose cooking sprang her from jail? And what about all those who managed to win their freedom by sidestepping tricks and traps or winning lawsuits?"...Bowley, Lynch and dozens of others are as vivid and surprising as the very real characters who made the veteran journalist's first book, Forbidden Fruit, a best-seller. Essence magazine described Forbidden Fruit as "a rich collection of true slave-era tales that are at times haunting, often riveting, but always triumphant in the end."...The same can be said of Freedom by Any Means, which takes a broader look at the various extraordinary ways that enslaved and dehumanized people achieved freedom and the means to a self-determined life. Among these people are visionaries who not only survived against the odds, but prospered -- building businesses, owning land and other property....The historical research that grounds this beautifully written narrative is drawn from unpublished memoirs, census records, government reports, periodicals, books and much more. The story of slavery and the African American experience before the Emancipation Proclamation "isn't one story," according to DeRamus, but rather a multitude of stories. This book reveals how men and women were willing not just to risk their lives to escape the slave system, but able to use their intelligence and cunning to manipulate the court system, outwit slave traders and brave the unknown in order to assert their humanity.

Freedom Facts and Firsts : 400 Years of the African American Civil Rights Experience / Jessie Carney Smith and Linda T. Wynn, editors ; [contributors, Crystal Ann deGregory ... [et al.]].  Canton, MI : Visible Ink Press, 2009.  390pp.  Main Library E185.61 .S636 2009 : Spanning nearly 400 years from the early abolitionists to the present, this guide book profiles more than 400 people, places, and events that have shaped the history of the black struggle for freedom. Coverage includes information on such mainstay figures as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Rosa Parks, but also delves into how lesser known figures contributed to and shaped the history of civil rights. Learn how the Housewives' League of Detroit started a nationwide movement to support black businesses, helping many to survive the depression; or discover what effect sports journalist Samuel Harold Lacy had on Jackie Robinson's historic entrance into the major leagues. This comprehensive resource chronicles the breadth and passion of an entire people's quest for freedom.

Freedom on the Border : an Oral History of the Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky / [compiled and edited by] Catherine Fosl and Tracy E. K'Meyer.   Lexington, Ky. : University Press of Kentucky, c2009.  309pp.  Main Library E185.93.K3 F74 2009 : In this book, Fosl and K'Meyer "gather the voices of more than one hundred courageous crusaders for civil rights, many of whom have never before spoken publicly about their experiences. These activists hail from all over Kentucky, offering a wide representation of the state's geography and culture while explaining the civil rights movement in their respective communities and in their own words."

Freedom Struggles : African Americans and World War I / Adriane Lentz-Smith.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  318pp.  Main Library D639.N4 L46 2009 : For many of the 200,000 black soldiers sent to Europe with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, encounters with French civilians and colonial African troops led them to imagine a world beyond Jim Crow. They returned home to join activists working to make that world real. In narrating the efforts of African American soldiers and activists to gain full citizenship rights as recompense for military service, Adriane Lentz-Smith illuminates how World War I mobilized a generation....Black and white soldiers clashed as much with one another as they did with external enemies. Race wars within the military and riots across the United States demonstrated the lengths to which white Americans would go to protect a carefully constructed caste system. Inspired by Woodrow Wilson’s rhetoric of self-determination but battered by the harsh realities of segregation, African Americans fought their own “war for democracy,” from the rebellions of black draftees in French and American ports to the mutiny of Army Regulars in Houston, and from the lonely stances of stubborn individuals to organized national campaigns. African Americans abroad and at home reworked notions of nation and belonging, empire and diaspora, manhood and citizenship. By war’s end, they ceased trying to earn equal rights and resolved to demand them....This beautifully written book reclaims World War I as a critical moment in the freedom struggle and places African Americans at the crossroads of social, military, and international history.

Freedom's Teacher : the Life of Septima Clark / Katherine Mellen Charron.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  462pp.  Main Library E185.97.C59 C48 2009 : In the mid-1950s, Septima Poinsette Clark (1898-1987), a former public school teacher, developed a citizenship training program that enabled thousands of African Americans to register to vote and then to link the power of the ballot to concrete strategies for individual and communal empowerment. In this biography of Clark, Charron demonstrates Clark's crucial role--and the role of many black women teachers--in making education a cornerstone of the twentieth-century freedom struggle.

From slavery to poverty : the racial origins of welfare in New York, 1840-1918 / Gunja SenGupta.  New York : New York University Press, c2009.  335pp.  Main Library HV99.N59 S43 2009  : The racially charged stereotype of "welfare queen"—an allegedly promiscuous waster who uses her children as meal tickets funded by tax-payers—is a familiar icon in modern America, but as Gunja SenGupta reveals in From Slavery to Poverty, her historical roots run deep. For, SenGupta argues, the language and institutions of poor relief and reform have historically served as forums for inventing and negotiating identity....Mining a broad array of sources on nineteenth-century New York City’s interlocking network of private benevolence and municipal relief, SenGupta shows that these institutions promoted a racialized definition of poverty and citizenship. But they also offered a framework within which working poor New Yorkers—recently freed slaves and disfranchised free blacks, Afro-Caribbean sojourners and Irish immigrants, sex workers and unemployed laborers, and mothers and children—could challenge stereotypes and offer alternative visions of community. Thus, SenGupta argues, long before the advent of the twentieth-century welfare state, the discourse of welfare in its nineteenth-century incarnation created a space to talk about community, race, and nation; about what it meant to be “American,” who belonged, and who did not. Her work provides historical context for understanding why today the notion of "welfare"—with all its derogatory “un-American” connotations—is associated not with middle-class entitlements like Social Security and Medicare, but rather with programs targeted at the poor, which are wrongly assumed to benefit primarily urban African Americans.

From Toussaint to Tupac : the Black International Since the Age of Revolution / edited by Michael O. West, William G. Martin, & Fanon Che Wilkins.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  318pp.  Main Library DT16.5 .F766 2009 : This collection of essays explores black internationalism--the struggle against oppression, whether manifested in slavery, colonialism, or racism. Contributors focus on three moments in global black history: the American and Haitian revolutions, the Garvey movement and the Communist International following World War I, and the Black Power movement of the late twentieth century to demonstrate how black internationalism emerged and influenced events in particular localities, how participants in the various struggles communicated across natural and man-made boundaries, and how the black international aided resistance on the local level, creating a collective consciousness.

The Ghost of Jim Crow : How Southern Moderates Used Brown v. Board of Education to Stall Civil Rights / Anders Walker.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  241pp.  Main Library E185.61 .W17 2009 : In "Letter from Birmingham Jail," Martin Luther King, Jr. asserted that "the Negro's great stumbling block in his stride toward freedom is not the White Citizen's Counciler or the Ku Klux Klanner, but the white moderate, who is more devoted to 'order' than to justice." To date, our understanding of the Civil Rights era has been largely defined by high-profile public events such as the crisis at Little Rock high school, bus boycotts, and sit-ins-incidents that were met with massive resistance and brutality. The resistance of Southern moderates to racial integration was much less public and highly insidious, with far-reaching effects. The Ghost of Jim Crow draws long-overdue attention to the moderate tactics that stalled the progress of racial equality in the South.
Anders Walker explores how three moderate Southern governors formulated masked resistance in the wake of Brown v. Board of Education. J. P. Coleman in Mississippi, Luther Hodges in North Carolina, and LeRoy Collins in Florida each developed workable, lasting strategies to neutralize black political activists and control white extremists. Believing it possible to reinterpret Brown on their own terms, these governors drew on creative legal solutions that allowed them to perpetuate segregation without overtly defying the federal government. Hodges, Collins, and Coleman instituted seemingly neutral criteria--academic, economic, and moral--in place of racial classifications, thereby laying the foundations for a new way of rationalizing racial inequality. Rather than focus on legal repression, they endorsed cultural pluralism and uplift, claiming that black culture was unique and should be preserved, free from white interference. Meanwhile, they invalidated common law marriages and cut state benefits to unwed mothers, then judged black families for having low moral standards. They expanded the jurisdiction of state police and established agencies like the Mississippi Sovereignty Commission to control unrest. They hired black informants, bribed black leaders, and dramatically expanded the reach of the state into private life. Through these tactics, they hoped to avoid violent Civil Rights protests that would draw negative attention to their states and confirm national opinions of the South as backward. By crafting positive images of their states as tranquil and free of racial unrest, they hoped to attract investment and expand southern economic development. In reward for their work, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson appointed them to positions in the federal government, defying notions that Republicans were the only party to absorb southern segregationists and stall civil rights.
An eye-opening approach to law and politics in the Civil Rights era, The Ghost of Jim Crow looks beyond extremism to highlight some of the subversive tactics that prolonged racial inequality.

Go, Tell Michelle : African American Women Write to the New First Lady / compiled and edited by Barbara A. Seals Nevergold and Peggy Brooks-Bertram.  Albany, N.Y. : State University of New York Press, c2009. 268pp.  Main Library E185.86 .G58 2009 : This book gathers together letters to Michelle Obama, written by African American and African women. Shortly after the election, the Uncrowned Queens Institute in Buffalo, New York, sent out a call across the country for African American women to share their hopes, fears, and advice with the new First Lady. Hundreds of letters and poems poured in, signaling both an unprecedented moment in our nation's history and a remarkable opportunity for African American women to look at the White House and see and speak to one of their own there....These very personal letters and poems, written by African American women from all ages and walks of life, celebrate a newfound hope for our world and children, speak to a strong sisterhood with the First Lady, confess often very private fears and dreams, and acknowledge and remember the generations before who endured so much for so long.

Featured Books, H-K

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

The Hanging of Thomas Jeremiah : a Free Black Man's Encounter With Liberty / J. William HarrisNew Haven : Yale University Press, c2009. 223pp.  Main Library F279.C453 J474 2009 : The tragic untold story of how a nation struggling for its freedom denied it to one of its own....In 1775, Thomas Jeremiah was one of fewer than five hundred “Free Negros” in South Carolina and, with an estimated worth of £1,000 (about $200,000 in today’s dollars), possibly the richest person of African descent in British North America. A slaveowner himself, Jeremiah was falsely accused by whites—who resented his success as a Charleston harbor pilot—of sowing insurrection among slaves at the behest of the British....Chief among the accusers was Henry Laurens, Charleston’s leading patriot, a slaveowner and former slave trader, who would later become the president of the Continental Congress. On the other side was Lord William Campbell, royal governor of the colony, who passionately believed that the accusation was unjust and tried to save Jeremiah’s life but failed. Though a free man, Jeremiah was tried in a slave court and sentenced to death. In August 1775, he was hanged and his body burned....J. William Harris tells Jeremiah’s story in full for the first time, illuminating the contradiction between a nation that would be born in a struggle for freedom and yet deny it—often violently—to others.

Health Issues in the Black Community / [edited by] Ronald L. Braithwaite, Sandra E. Taylor, and Henrie M. Treadwell.  San Francisco, CA : Jossey-Bass ; [Washington, DC] : APHA Press, c2009.  3rd edition, 620pp.  Main Library RA448.5.N4 H395 2009 : Written by a stellar panel of scholars and practitioners, Health Issues in the Black Community (third edition) provides the most complete coverage of the factors affecting the health status of African Americans. The need for this book is tremendous: in the seven years since the release of the second edition, the health status among African Americans has continued to be marginalized against national morbidity and mortality statistics.

Here I Stand : One City's Musical History / by Sonya Bernard-Hollins ; design by Sean Hollins.  Kalamazoo, MI : Fortitude Graphic Design & Printing, c2003, 2009.  144pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Book Collection ML394 .B47 2009 : Detroit has Motown, and Chicago had Record Row. But not many know about the talented musicians who honed their skills in a small town just between these two cities. The town is Battle Creek, Michigan and it was there that such legendary musicians such as Big Band composer, Sy Oliver, Motown sax genious Jr. Walker and the All Stars, and smooth soul singer Al Green, are all connected....Many never-before published photos and stories of these muscians and their rise to stardom have been gathered after more than 10 years research into a book which shares of these musical icons and the city they first began their careers. The entertaining history book takes readers from 1825 to the present while weaving a story of the city's history which includes those such as Sojourner Truth, the Underground Railroad, and the stories of musical artists who signed with such labels as Blue Note Vee Jay, Motown, and other labels, in addition to comedian Jimmy Lynch who went on to perform with Rudy Ray Moore in the Dolomite movies of the 1970s.

Hubert Harrison : the voice of Harlem radicalism, 1883-1918 / Jeffrey B. Perry. New York : Columbia University Press, c2009. 600pp.  Main Library E185.97.H367 P47 2009 : This first full-length biography of Harrison offers a portrait of a man ahead of his time in synthesizing race and class struggles in the U.S. and a leading influence on better known activists from Marcus Garvey to A. Philip Randolph. Harrison emigrated from St. Croix in 1883 and went on to become a foremost organizer for the Socialist Party in New York, the editor of the Negro World, and founder and leader of the World War I–era New Negro movement. Harrison’s enormous political and intellectual appetites were channeled into his work as an orator, writer, political activist, and critic. He was an avid bibliophile, reportedly the first regular black book reviewer, who helped to develop the public library in Harlem into an international center for research on black culture. But Harrison was a freelancer so candid in his criticism of the establishment—black and white—that he had few allies or people interested in protecting his legacy. Historian Perry’s detailed research brings to life a transformative figure who has been little recognized for his contributions to progressive race and class politics.

I am your sister : collected and unpublished writings of Audre Lorde / edited by Rudolph P. Byrd, Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Beverly Guy-Sheftall.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  280pp.  Main Library PS3562.O75 I3 2009 : Audre Lorde was not only a famous poet; she was also one of the most important radical black feminists of the past century. Her writings and speeches grappled with an impressive broad list of topics, including sexuality, race, gender, class, disease, the arts, parenting, and resistance, and they have served as a transformative and important foundation for theorists and activists in considering questions of power and social justice. Lorde embraced difference, and at each turn she emphasized the importance of using it to build shared strength among marginalized communities....I Am Your Sister is a collection of Lorde's non-fiction prose, written between 1976 and 1990, and it introduces new perspectives on the depth and range of Lorde's intellectual interests and her commitments to progressive social change. Presented here, for the first time in print, is a major body of Lorde's speeches and essays, along with the complete text of A Burst of Light and Lorde's landmark prose works Sister Outsider and The Cancer Journals. Together, these writings reveal Lorde's commitment to a radical course of thought and action, situating her works within the women's, gay and lesbian, and African American Civil Rights movements. They also place her within a continuum of black feminists, from Sojourner Truth, to Anna Julia Cooper, Amy Jacques Garvey, Lorraine Hansberry, and Patricia Hill Collins. I Am Your Sister concludes with personal reflections from Alice Walker, Gloria Joseph, Johnnetta Betsch Cole, Beverly Guy-Sheftall, and bell hooks on Lorde's political and social commitments and the indelibility of her writings for all who are committed to a more equitable society.

If We Could Change the World : Young People and America's Long Struggle for Racial Equality / Rebecca de Schweinitz.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  379pp.  Main Library E185.61 .D39 2009  : Rebecca de Schweinitz offers a new perspective on the civil rights movement by bringing children and youth to the fore. In the first book to connect young people and shifting ideas about children and youth with the black freedom struggle, de Schweinitz explains how popular ideas about youth and young people themselves—both black and white—influenced the long history of the movement....If We Could Change the World brings out the voices and experiences of participants who are rarely heard. Here, familiar events from the black freedom struggle are examined in new ways, and the explanations and motivations for getting involved and taking action are told, often in the words of young people themselves....Taking an interdisciplinary approach, de Schweinitz argues that examining historical constructions of childhood and the roles children have played in history changes the way one understands the past. With de Schweinitz's analysis, young people—elementary age, adolescent, and young adult—take their place as significant historical and political actors in the black freedom struggle.

In the Shadow of Du Bois : Afro-Modern Political Thought in America / Robert Gooding-Williams.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  350pp.  Main Library E185.97.D73 G664 2009 : The Souls of Black Folk is Du Bois’s outstanding contribution to modern political theory. It is his still influential answer to the question, “What kind of politics should African Americans conduct to counter white supremacy?” Here, in a major addition to American studies and the first book-length philosophical treatment of Du Bois’s thought, Robert Gooding-Williams examines the conceptual foundations of Du Bois’s interpretation of black politics. For Du Bois, writing in a segregated America, a politics capable of countering Jim Crow had to uplift the black masses while heeding the ethos of the black folk: it had to be a politics of modernizing “self-realization” that expressed a collective spiritual identity. Highlighting Du Bois’s adaptations of Gustav Schmoller’s social thought, the German debate over the Geisteswissenschaften, and William Wordsworth’s poetry, Gooding-Williams reconstructs Souls’ defense of this “politics of expressive self-realization,” and then examines it critically, bringing it into dialogue with the picture of African American politics that Frederick Douglass sketches in My Bondage and My Freedom. Through a novel reading of Douglass, Gooding-Williams characterizes the limitations of Du Bois’s thought and questions the authority it still exerts in ongoing debates about black leadership, black identity, and the black underclass. Coming to Bondage and then to these debates by looking backward and then forward from Souls, Gooding-Williams lets Souls serve him as a productive hermeneutical lens for exploring Afro-Modern political thought in America.

In the Shadow of Slavery : Africa's Botanical Legacy in the Atlantic World / Judith A. Carney, Richard Nicholas Rosomoff.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2009.  280pp.  Main Library E29.N3 C38 2009 : The transatlantic slave trade forced millions of Africans into bondage. Until the early nineteenth century, African slaves came to the Americas in greater numbers than Europeans. A seed of Memory provides a startling new assessment of the Atlantic slave trade and upends conventional wisdom by shifting attention from the crops slaves were forced to produce to the foods they planted for their own nourishment. Many familiar foods-millet, sorghum, coffee, okra, watermelon, and the "Asian" long bean, for example-are native to Africa, while commercial products such as Coca Cola, Worcestershire Sauce, and Palmolive Soap rely on African plants that were brought to the Americas on slave ships as provisions, medicines, cordage, and bedding. In this exciting, original, and groundbreaking book, Judith A. Carney and Richard Nicholas Rosomoff draw on archaeological records, oral histories, and the accounts of slave ship captains to show how slaves' food plots-"botanical gardens of the dispossessed"-became the incubators of African survival in the Americas and Africanized the food ways of plantation societies.

In Their Own Words : Voices from the Middle Passage / edited by A.J. Williams-Myers.  Trenton, NJ : Africa World Press, c2009.  96pp.  Main Library HT1322 .I5 2009

Inventing the new Negro : narrative, culture, and ethnography / Daphne Lamothe.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008.  232pp.  Main Library GN645 .L36 2008 : It is no coincidence, Daphne Lamothe writes, that so many black writers and intellectuals of the first half of the twentieth century either trained formally as ethnographers or worked as amateur collectors of folklore and folk culture. In Inventing the New Negro Lamothe explores the process by which key figures such as Zora Neale Hurston, Katherine Dunham, W. E. B. Du Bois, James Weldon Johnson, and Sterling Brown adapted ethnography and folklore in their narratives to create a cohesive, collective, and modern black identity....
Lamothe explores how these figures assumed the roles of self-reflective translators and explicators of African American and African diasporic cultures to Western, largely white audiences. Lamothe argues that New Negro writers ultimately shifted the presuppositions of both literary modernism and modernist anthropology by making their narratives as much about ways of understanding as they were about any quest for objective knowledge. In critiquing the ethnographic framework within which they worked, they confronted the classist, racist, and cultural biases of the dominant society and challenged their readers to imagine a different set of relations between the powerful and the oppressed....Inventing the New Negro combines an intellectual history of one of the most important eras of African American letters with nuanced and original readings of seminal works of literature. It will be of interest not only to Harlem Renaissance scholars but to anyone who is interested in the intersections of culture, literature, folklore, and ethnography.

Jim Crow America : a Documentary History / edited by Catherine M. Lewis and J. Richard Lewis.  Fayetteville : University of Arkansas Press, 2009.  271pp.  Main Library E185.61 .J527 2009  :  Historian C. Lewis and educator J. R. Lewis have compiled this eminently useful collection of primary source documents that will most certainly be invaluable to any history student trying to understand the complexities of Jim Crow segregation. Divided thematically into five chapters, this volume features documents that demonstrate the manner in which the US's apartheid system was invented, built, lived, resisted, and finally dismantled--none of which was an easy task. Clearly designed for classroom use, the volume includes a time line, a list of Web resources, an annotated bibliography, and even discussion questions--all of which are a bonus to the extremely functional collection of documents. Although many of the documents have been published previously, such as the Emancipation Proclamation, many have not; never have all these documents been published together. Most histories of Jim Crow segregation have focused either on one region or on a specific topic such as gender or law. This volume endeavors to sample all and does so admirably. The editors provide newspaper articles, letters, essays, political cartoons, legal documents, and photographs from both sides of the divide and from all around the nation; they flesh out Jim Crow's strange career in a manner that will help students understand the craft of history. A few typos are evident but do not distract overall from the outstanding content.

King's Dream / Eric J. Sundquist.  New Haven : Yale University Press, c2009.  295pp.  Main Library E185.97.K5 S864 2009 : “I have a dream”—no words are more widely recognized, or more often repeated, than those called out from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial by Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1963. King’s speech, elegantly structured and commanding in tone, has become shorthand not only for his own life but for the entire civil rights movement. In this new exploration of the “I have a dream” speech, Eric J. Sundquist places it in the history of American debates about racial justice—debates as old as the nation itself—and demonstrates how the speech, an exultant blend of grand poetry and powerful elocution, perfectly expressed the story of African American freedom....This book is the first to set King’s speech within the cultural and rhetorical traditions on which the civil rights leader drew in crafting his oratory, as well as its essential historical contexts, from the early days of the republic through present-day Supreme Court rulings.  At a time when the meaning of the speech has been obscured by its appropriation for every conceivable cause, Sundquist clarifies the transformative power of King’s “Second Emancipation Proclamation” and its continuing relevance for contemporary arguments about equality.

Featured Books, L-M

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

Letters from Black America / edited by Pamela Newkirk.  New York : Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2009.  372pp.  Main Library E184.6 .L49 2009 : Letters from Black America fills a literary and historical void by presenting the pantheon of African American experience in the most intimate way possible—through the heartfelt correspondence of the men and women who lived through monumental changes and pivotal events, from the 1700s to the twenty-first century, from slavery to the war in Iraq....The first-ever narrative history of African Americans told through their own letters, this book includes the thoughts of politicians, writers, and entertainers, as well as those of slaves, servicemen, and domestic workers. From a slave who writes to his wife on the eve of being sold to famous documents like Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “Letter from Birmingham Jail,” these writings illuminate struggles and triumphs, hardships and glory, in the unforgettable words of the participants themselves. Letters from Black America is an indispensable addition to our country’s literary tradition, historical understanding, and self-knowledge. 

Liberalism, Black Power, and the Making of American Politics, 1965-1980 / Devin Fergus.  Athens : University of Georgia Press, c2009.  364pp.  Main Library E185.93.N6 F47 2009 : In this pioneering exploration of the interplay between liberalism and black nationalism, Devin Fergus returns to the tumultuous era of Johnson, Nixon, Carter, and Helms and challenges us to see familiar political developments through a new lens. What if the liberal coalition, instead of being torn apart by the demands of Black Power, actually engaged in a productive relationship with radical upstarts, absorbing black separatists into the political mainstream and keeping them from a more violent path? What if the New Right arose not only in response to Great Society Democrats but, as significantly, in reaction to Republican moderates who sought compromise with black nationalists through conduits like the Blacks for Nixon movement?...Focusing especially on North Carolina, a progressive southern state and a national center of Black Power activism, Fergus reveals how liberal engagement helped to bring a radical civic ideology back from the brink of political violence and social nihilism. He covers Malcolm X Liberation University and Soul City, two largely forgotten, federally funded black nationalist experiments; the political scene in Winston-Salem, where Black Panthers were elected to office in surprising numbers; and the liberal-nationalist coalition that formed in 1974 to defend Joan Little, a black prisoner who killed a guard she accused of raping her. Throughout, Fergus charts new territory in the study of America's recent past, taking up largely unexplored topics such as the expanding political role of institutions like the ACLU and the Ford Foundation and the emergence of sexual violence as a political issue. He also urges American historians to think globally by drawing comparisons between black nationalism in the United States and other separatist movements around the world....By 1980, Fergus writes, black radicals and their offspring were "more likely to petition Congress than blow it up." That liberals engaged black radicalism at all, however, was enough for New Right insurgents to paint liberalism as an effete, anti-American ideology--a sentiment that has had lasting appeal to significant numbers of voters.

The life and adventures of Nat Love, better known in the cattle country as "Deadwood Dick" / introduction to the Bison Books edition by Brackette F. Williams.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c1995.  162pp.  Main Library F594 .L89 1995 : Thousands of black cowpunchers drove cattle up the Chisholm Trail after the Civil War, but only Nat Love wrote about his experiences. Born to slaves in Davidson County, Tennessee, the newly freed Love struck out for Kansas after the war. He was fifteen and already endowed with a reckless and romantic readiness. In wide-open Dodge City he joined up with an outfit from the Texas Panhandle to begin a career riding the range and fighting Indians, outlaws, and the elements. Years later he would say, "I had an unusually adventurous life."...That was rare understatement. More characteristic was Love's claim: "I carry the marks of fourteen bullet wounds on different parts of my body, most any one of which would be sufficient to kill an ordinary man, but I am not even crippled." In 1876 a virtuoso rodeo performance in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, won him the moniker of Deadwood Dick. He became known as DD all over the West, entering into dime novels as a mysteriously dark and heroic presence. This vivid autobiography includes encounters with Bat Masterson and Billy the Kid, a soon-after view of the Custer battlefield, and a successful courtship. Love left the range in 1890, the year of the official closing of the frontier. Then, as a Pullman train conductor he traveled his old trails, and those good times bring his story to a satisfying end.

Life upon these shores : looking at African American history, 1513-2008 / Henry Louis Gates, Jr.  New York : Knopf, 2011.  487pp.  E185 .G27 2011 : "Henry Louis Gates, Jr., gives us a sumptuously illustrated, landmark book tracing African American history from the arrival of the conquistadors to the election of Barack Obama. Informed by the latest, sometimes provocative scholarship, and including more than eight hundred images--ancient maps, art, documents, photographs, cartoons, posters--Life Upon These Shores focuses on defining events, debates, and controversies, as well as the achievements of people famous and obscure. Gates takes us from the sixteenth century through the ordeal of slavery, from the Civil War and Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era and the Great Migration; from the civil rights and black nationalist movements through the age of hip-hop on to the Joshua generation. By documenting and illuminating the sheer diversity of African American involvement in American history, society, politics, and culture, Gates bracingly disabuses us of the presumption of a single "Black Experience." Life Upon These Shores is a book of major importance, a breathtaking tour de force of the historical imagination"

Lift every voice : the history of African American music / Burton W. Peretti.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2009.  223pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection (4 West) ML3556 .P45 2009 : Lift Every Voice traces the roots of black music in Africa and slavery and its evolution in the United States from the end of slavery to the present day. The music's creators, consumers, and distributors are all part of the story. Musical genres such as spirituals, ragtime, the blues, jazz, gospel, rhythm and blues, rock, soul, and hip-hop-as well as black contributions to classical, country, and other American music forms-depict the continuities and innovations that mark both the music and the history of African Americans. A rich selection of documents helps to define the place of music within African American communities and the nation as a whole.

Lift Every Voice : the NAACP and the Making of the Civil Rights Movement / Patricia Sullivan.  New York : New Press : Distributed by Perseus Distribution, 2009.  514pp.  Main Library E185.5.N276 S85 2009 : Published in conjunction with the NAACP centennial celebration, this resource begins with the little-known early decades of NAACP activism and then moves on to the critical post-war era, when the organization knocked out the legal underpinnings of segregation.

Little Richard : : The Birth of Rock 'N' Roll / David Kirby. New York : Continuum, c2009. 218pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML420 .K57 2009 : Kirby offers a short biography of Little Richard that places his song "Tutti Frutti" at the origin of rock 'n' roll. Through interviews with relatives and locals and other sources, he describes Little Richard in the days before his career in Macon, Georgia, within the context of the town and music at the time; the recording of "Tutti Frutti"; his impact on teen culture; and his place in history, showbiz persona, his movie roles, and concerts.

"A Long Time Coming" : The Inspiring, Combative 2008 Campaign and The Historic Election of Barack Obama / Evan Thomas ; with exclusive, behind-the-scenes reporting by the staff of Newsweek.  New York : PublicAffairs, c2009.  220pp.  Main Library JK526 2008 .T56 2009 : Since 1984, Newsweek has been renowned for its vivid, in-depth special election coverage of the ordeal of running for the presidency. A year before the election, Newsweek assigns reporters to get inside the campaigns of the Republican and Democratic candidates. Newsweek promises not to publish any information until after the votes are cast, and in exchange, the reporters receive remarkable access. They travel with the candidates, are there at crucial turning points and confidential meetings, and uncover stories not covered in day-to-day reporting....In this book, a compelling narrative by Evan Thomas, Newsweek shares the inside stories from one of the most exciting elections in recent history, illuminating the personalities and events that influenced the outcome, and taking stock of the key players and key issues for the new administration. This will be an absorbing read for anyone interested in American politics.

Lynching and Spectacle : Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940 / Amy Louise Wood.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  349pp.  Main Library HV6457 .W66 2009  : Lynch mobs in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America often exacted horrifying public torture and mutilation on their victims. In Lynching and Spectacle, Amy Wood explains what it meant for white Americans to perform and witness these sadistic spectacles and what they derived from them. Lynching, Wood argues, overlapped with a wide range of cultural practices and performances, both traditional and modern, including public executions, religious rituals, photography, and cinema. The connections between lynching and these practices encouraged the horrific violence committed and gave it social acceptability....Wood expounds on the critical role lynching spectacles played in establishing and affirming white supremacy at the turn of the century, particularly in towns and cities experiencing great social instability and change. She also shows how the national dissemination of lynching images fueled the momentum of the antilynching movement and ultimately led to the decline of lynching. By examining lynching spectacles alongside both traditional and modern practices and within both local and national contexts, Wood reconfigures our understanding of lynching's relationship to modern life.

Making a Way Out of No Way : African American Women and the Second Great Migration / Lisa Krissoff Boehm.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2009.  297pp.  Main Library E185.86 .B6325 2009 : Boehm's 40 oral history interviews with African American women who participated in the second great south-to-north migration of workers in the two decades after WW II add important material to the growing collections of historical evidence from previously ignored historical actors. Boehm (Worcester State College) also includes oral histories from other collections to document her thesis that "in struggling to establish themselves as agents of their own life direction, the women ... ultimately pieced together beautiful lives out of the sometimes tattered scraps supplied to them." In addition to presenting new material, the author discusses important issues about women's studies and oral history. Can one use the concepts of agency and choice when most of these women's choices were severely circumscribed? Boehm answers affirmatively, emphasizing women's resilience and persistence as positive aspects of their lives. Following Mary Catherine Bateson, she sees "desperate improvisation as significant achievement." Boehm also raises a continuing paradox for oral history practitioners: whether the oral historian's role should be to "honor the respondent's story" or to correct historical facts. Boehm chooses the former. An important addition to the literature about women and work and African American history.

Mongrel Nation : the America Begotten by Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings / Clarence E. Walker.  Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009.  128pp.  Main Library E185.62 .W35 2009 : The debate over the affair between Thomas Jefferson and Sally Hemings rarely rises above the question of "Did they or didn't they?" And lost become equally urgent questions about a history that is more complex, both sexually and culturally, than most realize. Mongrel Nation seeks to uncover this complexity, as well as the reasons it is so often obscured....Clarence Walker contends that the relationship between Jefferson and Hemings must be seen not in isolation but in the broader context of interracial affairs within the plantation complex. From this perspective, the relationship was not unusual or aberrant but fairly typical. For many, this is a disturbing realization, because it forces us to abandon the idea of American exceptionalism and reexamine slavery in America as part of a long. global history of slaveholders frequently crossing the color line....More than many other societies and despite our obvious mixed-race population - our nation has displayed particular reluctance to acknowledge this dynamic. In a country where, as early as 1662, interracial sex was already punishable by law, an understanding of the Hemings-Jefferson relationship has consistently met with resistance. From Jefferson's time to our own, the general public denied -or remained oblivious to - the possibility of the affair, Historians, too, dismissed the idea, even when confronted with compelling arguments by fellow scholars. It took the DNA findings of 1998 to persuade many....The refusal to admit the likelihood of this union stems, of course, from Jefferson's symbolic significance as a Founding Father. The president's apologists, both before and after the DNA findings, have constructed an iconic Jefferson that tells us more about their own beliefs - and the often alarming demands of those beliefs -than it does about the interaction between slave owners and slaves. Much more than a search for the facts about two individuals, the debate over Jefferson and Hemings is emblematic of tensions in our society between competing conceptions both of race and of our nation.

Montage of a dream : the art and life of Langston Hughes / edited by John Edgar Tidwell and Cheryl R. Ragar ; with a foreword by Arnold Rampersad.  Columbia : University of Missouri Press, c2007.  351pp.  Main Library PS3515.U274 Z6845 2007 : Over a forty-six-year career, Langston Hughes experimented with black folk expressive culture, creating an enduring body of extraordinary imaginative writing. Riding the crest of African American creative energy from the Harlem Renaissance to the onset of Black Power, he commanded an artistic prowess that survives in the legacy he bequeathed to a younger generation of writers, including Alice Walker, Paule Marshall, and Amiri Baraka. Montage of a Dream extends and deepens previous scholarship, multiplying the ways in which Hughes’s diverse body of writing can be explored. By showing that Hughes continues to speak to the fundamentals of human nature, this comprehensive reconsideration invites a renewed appreciation of Hughes’s work—and encourages new readers to discover his enduring relevance as they seek to understand the world in which we all live.

A Movement Without Marches : African American Women and the Politics of Poverty in Postwar Philadelphia / Lisa LevensteinChapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  300pp.  Main Library F158.9.N4 L485 2009  As she looked at gendered responses to the problems of urban poverty, Levenstein (Univ. of North Carolina, Greensboro) found that African American women created a dynamic give-and-take with Philadelphia's public institutions, shaping to some degree those institutional responses to their needs. While chronically underfunded, these institutions remained the principal way for working mothers to acquire the basics for their children. Negotiation pursued by mothers--sometimes unwed, frequently suffering from domestic abuse, always desperate to feed and clothe their families--brought a range of results. The most surprising successes came through the municipal court, well disposed to deal with childcare and restraining orders, putting limited state power behind completely marginalized women. At the other end, public schooling proved to be a great failure when massive white resistance to desegregation created isolated, second-rate schools that further held back black students by a program of tracking that effectively led to lower-paying, semi-skilled careers. Levenstein's focus on the 1950s and 1960s serves to explore the roots of political and social activism embraced by so many younger black people in the subsequent decade. The model for this next generation grew from their mothers' experience acting in concert to promote change, albeit without the overt political or public demonstrations.

Muhammad Ali : the Making of an Icon / Michael Ezra.  Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2009.  233pp.  Main Library GV1132.A4 E97 2009 : For a generation Muhammad Ali held the Guinness World Record as the most written-about person in history. Boxing champion, political lighting rod, poet, preacher, and man who constantly reinvented himself, Ali has both mirrored and helped shape modern America. Early on, he asserted that he did not have to be what others wanted him to be, that he was free to be himself. Ezra (Sonoma State Univ.) examines how people perceived Ali and how economic groups managed and manipulated his image for personal gain. In pursuing these themes, the author concentrates on Ali's early relationship with the Louisville Sponsoring Group (wealthy citizens who furthered his career) and the Nation of Islam, and on his reemergence as a cultural force after retirement. In short, most of the book deals with Ali's early and later career. Well researched and well argued, Ezra's book occasionally has an economically reductionist ring: to be sure, many made fortunes from their associations with Ali; whether their driving motive was economic gain is less certain. Still, Ezra's thoughtful study makes the reader wary of ever understanding the "real" Ali. Ali loves magic, and his greatest trick has been spending so much time in the public gaze while concealing himself. 

The Music Has Gone Out of the Movement : Civil Rights and the Johnson Administration, 1965-1968 / David C. Carter.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  359pp.  Main Library E185.615 .C3517 2009  : Contents - Leapfrogging the movement -- Romper lobbies and coloring lessons -- The cocktail hour on the Negro question -- Bomb throwers and babes in the wood -- Mississippi is everywhere -- The unwelcome guest at the feast -- Scouting the star-spangled jungles -- Just file them--or get rid of them.

Muslims in America : a Short History / Edward E. Curtis IV.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  144pp.  Main Library E184.M88 C877 2009 : Muslims are neither new nor foreign to the United States. They have been a vital presence in North America since the 16th century. Muslims in America unearths their history, documenting the lives of African, Middle Eastern, South Asian, European, black, white, Hispanic and other Americans who have been followers of Islam....The book begins with the tale of Job Ben Solomon, a 18th century African American Muslim slave, and goes on to chart the stories of sodbusters in North Dakota, African American converts to Islam in the 1920s, Muslim barkeepers in Toledo, the post-1965 wave of professional immigrants from Asia and Africa, and Muslim Americans after 9/11. The book reveals the richness of Sunni, Shi'a, Sufi and other forms of Islamic theology, ethics, and rituals in the United States by illustrating the way Islamic faith has been imagined and practiced in the everyday lives of individuals. Muslims in America recovers the place of Muslims in the larger American story, too. Showing how Muslim American men and women participated in each era of U.S. history, the book explores how they have both shaped and have been shaped by larger historical trends such as the abolition movement, Gilded Age immigration, the Great Migration of African Americans, urbanization, religious revivalism, the feminist movement, and the current war on terror. It also shows how, from the very beginning of American history, Muslim Americans have been at once a part of their local communities, their nation, and the worldwide community of Muslims....The first single-author history of Muslims in America from colonial times to the present, this book fills a huge gap and provides invaluable background on one of the most poorly understood groups in the United States.

Featured Books, N-R

Recently acquired books in the MSU Libraries.  Note : always check the online catalog for latest information on location and status.  If book says "in process", it can be requested at the Circulation Desk.

NAACP : Celebrating a Century : 100 Years in Pictures / NAACP and The Crisis Magazine; [text by Julian Bond, et al]  Layton, Utah : Gibbs Smith, c2009.  456pp.  Main Library E185.61 .N32 2009 : Enhanced by hundreds of photographs, chronicles the one-hundred-year history of America's most oldest, largest, and most important civil rights organization.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / written by himself ; introduction by Robert B. Stepto.  Cambridge, MA : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, c2009.  125pp.  Main Library E449 .D749 2009 : No book more vividly explains the horror of American slavery and the emotional impetus behind the antislavery movement than Frederick Douglass’s Narrative. In an introductory essay, Robert Stepto re-examines the extraordinary life and achievement of a man who escaped from slavery to become a leading abolitionist and one of our most important writers. The John Harvard Library text reproduces the first edition, published in Boston in 1845.

Now is the Time! : Detroit Black Politics and Grassroots Activism / Todd C. Shaw. Durham : Duke University Press, 2009.  288pp.  Main Library F574.D49 N48225 2009 : Now Is the Time! delves into the political strategies of post-Civil Rights Movement African American activists in Detroit, Michigan, to discover the conditions for effective social activism. Analyzing a wide range of grassroots community housing initiatives intended to revitalize Detroit's failing urban center and aid its impoverished population, Todd C. Shaw seeks to understand why certain collective actions have far-reaching effects while others fail to yield positive results. He emerges with EBAM (Effective Black Activism Model), a detailed political model that illuminates crucial elements of successful grassroots activism: strong alliances, strategic advantages, and adaptive techniques. EBAM shows that to be effective political action must happen at the right time, in the right place, and with the right tactic.
Shaw employs the tools of social movement analysis, including the qualitative analysis of budgets, electoral data, and housing statistics, as well as historical research and personal interviews, to better understand the dilemmas, innovations, and dynamics of grassroots activism. He begins with a history of discriminatory housing practices and racial divisions that deeply affected Detroit following the Second World War and set the stage for the election of the city's first black mayor, Coleman Young. By emphasizing downtown redevelopment, Mayor Young's administration often collided with low-income housing advocates. Only through grassroots activism were those advocates able to delay or derail governmental efforts to demolish low-income housing in order to make way for more upscale development. Shaw then looks at present-day public housing activism, assessing the mixed success of the nationally sponsored HOPE VI project aimed at fostering home ownership in low-income areas. Descriptive and prescriptive, Now Is the Time! traces the complicated legacy of community activism to illuminate what is required for grassroots activists to be effective in demanding public accountability to poor and marginalized citizens.

Obama : the Historic Journey / introduction by Bill Keller ; biographical text by Jill Abramson ; editors, Vincent Alabiso ... [et al.] ; art director, Toshiya Masuda.  New York : New York Times : Callaway : Distributed by Riverhead Books, 2009.  237pp.  Oversize Collection (Basement, Center) E908 .A27 2009 : This is the remarkable story of Barack Obama's journey to the White House, as told by the greatest cultural recorders in the world, the staff of The New York Times. From the first mention of Barack Obama in its pages (when he was elected president of the Harvard Law Review), to his electrifying speech at the 2004 Democratic Convention, to the days and months of the hardfought, innovative campaign for Presidency, The New York Times has documented, recorded, and analyzed Obama in all the ways that he has irrevocably changed this country....In twelve rich chapters, filled with award-winning photos and graphics, as well as text from Nobel Prize and Pulitzer–winning columnists like Paul Krugman and Thomas Friedman, and seasoned political reporters like Adam Nagourney, The New York Times tells ObamaÂ's unlikely and incredible journey from the beginning all the way to his inauguration as President of the United States. Jill Abramson, the managing editor of the Times will provide biographical text and Bill Keller, the executive editor, will pen the introduction. Throughout, there will be profiles of important figures in ObamaÂ's life and the campaign— Valerie Jarrett, Hillary Clinton, John McCain, his parents and grandparents, and Michelle Obama. ObamaÂ's own writing, from his memoirs and speeches across the country, will be included, along with what will surely be an iconic, groundbreaking speech—his Inauguration Day speech....This book will be a treasured cultural document and the pinnacle of election coverage. This is the best of the best showcasing the most extraordinary political event of recent times.

The Odyssey of an African Slave / by Sitiki ; edited by Patricia C. Griffin. Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2009.  21pp.  Main Library E444.S53 A3 2009 : Presents the memoir of a nineteenth-century slave, from his kidnapping in Africa, his journey to America, his life as a slave in North Carolina, his impressions of Spanish St. Augustine, and his change of status to freedman and minister.

Our minds on freedom : women and the struggle for Black equality in Louisiana, 1924-1967 / Shannon Frystak.  Baton Rouge : Louisiana State University Press, 2010 [c2009]  261pp.  E185.93.L6 F79 2010 : Traditionally, literature on the civil rights movement has highlighted the leadership of ministerial men and young black revolutionaries like the Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr., Stokely Carmichael, and Malcolm X. Though recent studies have begun to explore female participation in the struggle for racial justice, women have generally been relegated to the margins of civil rights history. In Our Minds on Freedom, Shannon Frystak explores the organizational and leadership roles female civil rights activists in Louisiana assumed from the 1920s to the 1960s, highlighting a diverse group of courageous women who fought alongside their brothers and fathers, uncles and cousins, to achieve a more racially just Louisiana....From the Depression through World War II and the postwar years, Frystak shows, black women joined and led local unions and civil rights organizations, agitating for voting rights and equal treatment in the public arena, in employment, and in admission to Louisiana's institutions of higher learning. At the same time, black women and white women began to find common ground in organizations such as the YWCA, the NAACP, and the National Urban League. Frystak explores how women of both races worked together to organize the 1953 Baton Rouge bus boycott, which served as inspiration for the more famous Montgomery bus boycott two years later;in the day-to-day struggle to alter the system of unequal education throughout the state; and in the fight to integrate New Orleans schools after the 1954 Brown decision....In the early 1960s, a new generation of female activists joined their older female counterparts to work with organizations such as the NAACP, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), and a number of local grassroots civil rights organizations. Frystak vividly describes the very real dangers they faced canvassing for voter registration in Louisiana's rural areas, teaching in Freedom Schools, and hosting out-of-town civil rights workers in their homes....As Frystak shows, the civil rights movement allowed women to step out of their socially prescribed roles as wives, mothers, and daughters and become significant actors, indeed leaders, in a social movement structure largely dominated by men. Our Minds on Freedom is a welcome addition to the literature of the civil rights movement and will intrigue those interested in African American history, women's history, Louisiana, or the U.S. South.

Overcoming Katrina : African American Voices From the Crescent City and Beyond / [edited by] D'Ann R. Penner and Keith C. Ferdinand ; foreword by Jimmy Carter. New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.  248pp.  Main Library F379.N59 N4 2009 : Overcoming Katrina tells the stories of 27 New Orleanians as they fought to survive Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. Their oral histories offer first-hand experiences: three days on a roof with Navy veteran Leonard Smith; at the convention center with waitress Eleanor Thornton; and with Willie Pitford, an elevator man, as he rescued 150 people in New Orleans East. Overcoming approaches the question of why New Orleans matters, from perspectives of the individuals who lived, loved, worked, and celebrated life and death there prior to being scattered across the country by Hurricane Katrina. This book's twenty-seven narrators range from Mack Slan, a conservative businessman who disparages the younger generation for not sharing his ability to make "good, rational decisions," to Kalamu ya Salaam, who was followed by the New Orleans Police Department for several years as a militant defender of Black Power in the late 1960s and '70s. These narratives are memorials to the corner stores, the Baptist churches, the community health clinics, and those streets where the aunties stood on the corner, and whose physical traces have now all been washed away. They conclude with visions of a safer, equitably rebuilt New Orleans.

Painting Harlem modern : the art of Jacob Lawrence / Patricia Hills.  Berkeley : University of California Press, 2009.  354pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection (4 West) ND237.L29 H55 2009 : Jacob Lawrence was one of the best-known African American artists of the twentieth century, but his work has never been the focus of an in-depth study. In Painting Harlem Modern, Patricia Hills renders a vivid assessment of Lawrence's long and productive career. She argues that his complex, cubist-based paintings developed out of a vital connection with a modern Harlem that was filled with artists, writers, musicians, and social activists. She also uniquely positions Lawrence alongside such important African American writers as Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison....Drawing from a wide range of archival materials and artists' interviews, Hills interprets Lawrence's art as distilled from a life of struggle and perseverance. She brings insightful analysis to his work, beginning with the 1930s street scenes that provided Harlem with its pictorial image. She follows each decade chronologically, including his impressions of Southern Jim Crow segregation and a groundbreaking discussion of Lawrence's symbolic use of masks and masking during the 1950s Cold War era. An absorbing book that is likely to become the definitive work on this seminal figure in American art, Painting Harlem Modern highlights Lawrence's heroic efforts to meet his many challenges while remaining true to his humanist values and artistic vision.

Passage on the Underground Railroad / photographs by Stephen Marc ; with contributions from Keith Griffler, Diane Miller, and Carla Williams.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2009.  143pp.  Fine Arts Library Art Collection E450 .M37 2009 : A photographer's evocative interpretation of the history and places along the slave's path to freedom.

Passing Strange : a Gilded Age Tale of Love and Deception Across the Color Line / Martha A. Sandweiss. New York : Penguin Press, 2009.  370pp.  Browsing Collection (1 East) E185.625 .S255 2009 : Clarence King is a hero of nineteenth-century western history. Brilliant scientist and witty conversationalist, bestselling author and architect of the great surveys that mapped the West after the Civil War, King hid a secret from his Gilded Age cohorts and prominent Newport family: for thirteen years he lived a double life--as the celebrated white Clarence King and as a black Pullman porter and steelworker. Unable to marry the black woman he loved, the fair-haired, blue-eyed King passed as a Negro, revealing his secret to his wife Ada only on his deathbed. Historian Martha Sandweiss is the first writer to uncover the life that King tried so hard to conceal. She reveals the complexity of a man who, while publicly espousing a personal dream of a uniquely American amalgam of white and black, hid his love for his wife and their five biracial children.

Paths to freedom : manumission in the Atlantic world / edited by Rosemary Brana-Shute and Randy J. Sparks.  Columbia, S.C. : University of South Carolina Press, c2009. 397pp.  Main Library HT1031 .P37 2009  : Historians mostly in the US but also elsewhere in the Americas cast some welcome light on the little studied practice of freeing individual slaves while the practice and institution of slavery continued. Among the insights they provide is that manumission was not a disinterested practice that countered or even humanized slavery, but was a response to the needs of slave owners within their own societies and economies. The topics include metropolitan Spain and the Canaries in the 15th and 16th centuries, the limits of manumission for enslaved Africans in 18th-century British West Indian sugar society, sex and gender in Surinamese manumissions, the struggle of liberated Africans for final emancipation in Brazil from the 1840s to the 1860s, and the slave owner's family and manumission in the post-revolutionary Chesapeake tidewater.

Peculiar passages : black women playwrights, 1875 to 2000 / Carol Dawn Allen.  New York : Peter Lang, c2005.  295pp.  Main Library PS338.N4 A425 2005 : This book features African American women playwrights from 1875 to 2000, with an emphasis on the late nineteenth century, a period rarely treated in regard to women's drama. Highlighting the lesser-known Pauline Hopkins, Angelina Weld Grimké, Georgia Douglas Johnson, Eulalie Spence, and May Miller, and the well-known Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Childress, Adrienne Kennedy, and Ntozake Shange, Peculiar Passages argues that these playwrights' efforts define a tradition characterized by quick-change mobility, sensitivity to vernacular forms, and dedication to intertextual dialogue. Situating the plays within a broader context, the book also connects them to minstrelsy, the Passion Play, and the Black Arts Movement.

A Philanthropic Covenant With Black America [electronic resource] / edited by Rodney M. Jackson ; introduction by Tavis Smiley ; afterword by Emmett D. Carson.  Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2009.  1 online resource (xviii, 238 p.) ; 24 cm.  Available via ebrary : A Philanthropic Covenant will feature eight essays from several prominent African American grantmakers, scholars, activists and clergy that will examine critical elements of modern philanthropy and how they affect Black communities for good and for ill. Each chapter will include statistical documentation of the issues, strategic recommendations to improve the quality of Black life, and examples of outstanding models already being practiced throughout the country. A Philanthropic Covenant is intended to inform individuals, grantors, religious organizations, fundraisers and youth how philanthropy--time, talent and treasure--can be strategically mobilized to assist Black communities in dealing more effectively with the issues outlined in The Covenant with Black America. Throughout the book, emphasis will be placed on the role, responsibilities and potential of African Americans and African-American philanthropy, in particular, to affect positive change in their own communities.

Picturing the New Negro : Harlem Renaissance print culture and modern black identity / Caroline Goeser.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2007.  360pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection (4 West) NC961.7.A37 G64 2007 : Goeser offers an important contribution to art history because it contains the first in-depth examination of African American illustration. Amy H. Kirschke's Art in Crisis  is close on its heels. Known painters such as Aaron Douglas, Laura Wheeler Waring, and Albert Smith are discussed here as well as many other artists who do not appear in any surveys of African American art; however, their work was undoubtedly seen by more people than that of William H. Johnson or Horace Pippin. Goeser argues how these popular artists responded to and shaped views about contemporary racial politics and issues of identity for their audiences in the 1920s-30s. Though some of the author's readings optimistically interpret the use of racial conventions as subversive, other aspects of the book are very noteworthy. There are new, significant readings of Bruce Nugent's visual art in relation to his writing, and Goeser provides a fascinating window onto the interracial partnerships among illustrators, editors, and authors at both Knopf and Harper during that time. There are 90 black-and-white illustrations. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through professionals.

The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom / Steven Hahn.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  246pp.  Main Library E449 .H15 2009 :  Pulitzer Prize–winner Steven Hahn’s provocative new book challenges deep-rooted views in the writing of American and African-American history. Moving from slave emancipations of the eighteenth century through slave activity during the Civil War and on to the black power movements of the twentieth century, he asks us to rethink African-American history and politics in bolder, more dynamic terms....Historians have offered important new perspectives and evidence concerning the geographical expanse of slavery in the United States and the protracted process of abolishing it. They have also uncovered a wealth of new material on the political currents running through black communities from enslavement to the present day. Yet their scholarship has failed to dislodge familiar interpretive frameworks that may no longer make much sense of the past....Based on the Nathan I. Huggins Lectures at Harvard University, The Political Worlds of Slavery and Freedom asks why this may be so and offers sweeping reassessments. It defines new chronological and spatial boundaries for American and African-American politics during the first half of the nineteenth century. It suggests, with historical comparisons, that we may have missed a massive slave rebellion during the Civil War. And it takes a serious look at the development and appeal of Garveyism and the hidden history of black politics it may help to reveal. Throughout, it presents African Americans as central actors in the arenas of American politics, while emphasizing traditions of self-determination, self-governance, and self-defense among them.

Pops : A Life of Louis Armstrong / Terry Teachout.  Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009.  475pp.  Fine Arts, Music Collection (4 West)  ML419.A75 T43 2009 : Louis Armstrong was the greatest jazz musician of the twentieth century and a giant of modern American culture. Offstage he was witty, introspective and unexpectedly complex, a beloved colleague with an explosive temper whose larger-than-life personality was tougher and more sharp-edged than his worshipping fans ever knew. Wall Street Journal arts columnist Terry Teachout has drawn on new sources unavailable to previous biographers, including hundreds of private recordings of backstage and after-hours conversations, to craft a sweeping new narrative biography of this towering figure that shares, for the first time, full, accurate versions of such storied events as Armstrong's quarrel with President Eisenhower and his decision to break up his big band.

Race, Wrongs, and Remedies : Group Justice in the 21st CenturyLanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield ; Stanford, Calif. : Published in cooperation with the Hoover Institute, c2009  190pp.  Main Library HV9950 .W37 2009 :  Contents - The remedial ideal and the demand for racial justice -- Group disadvantage and the case of race -- Racial disparities and human capital deficit -- The psychology of victimization -- Is self-help possible? -- Reparations, Affirmative Action, and the relationship of race and class.

Racial Justice in the Age of Obama / Roy Brooks.  Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2009.  237pp.  Main Library E185.615 .B7297 2009 : With the election of Barack Obama as the first black president of the United States, the issue of racial justice in America occupies center stage. Have black Americans finally achieved racial justice? Is government intervention no longer required? Racial Justice in the Age of Obama considers contemporary civil rights questions and theories, and offers fresh insights and effective remedies for race issues in America today.While there are now unprecedented opportunities for talented African Americans, Roy Brooks shows that lingering deficiencies remain within the black community. Exploring solutions to these social ills, Brooks identifies competing civil rights theories and perspectives, organizing them into four distinct categories--traditionalism, reformism, limited separation, and critical race theory. After examining each approach, Brooks constructs the best civil rights theory for the Obama phase of the post-civil rights era. Brooks supports his theoretical model with strong statistics that break down the major racial groups along such demographics as income and education. He factors in the cultural and structural explanations for the nation's racial divisions, and he addresses affirmative action, the failures of integration, the negative aspects of black urban culture, and the black community's limited access to resources. The book focuses on African Americans, but its lessons are relevant for other groups, including Latinos, Asians, women, and gays and lesbians.Racial Justice in the Age of Obama maps out today's civil rights questions so that all groups can achieve equality at a time of unprecedented historical change. 

Raised From the Dead : the Personal Testimony of "America's First Evangelical Anchorman" / By Frank Turner.  Canton, MI : Zoe Life Pub., c2008.  300pp.  Main Library BR1725.T78 A3 2008 : The gripping and powerful account of Emmy Award-winning television news anchor Frank Turner's descent into hopeless drug addiction even as his career was skyrocketing him to fame, wealth and prominence.  This riveting and heart-renching story includes Frank s personal account of: (1) Abandonment and sexual abuse as a child; (2) Addiction to smoking pure cocaine; (3) Marriage to the daughter of Louis Farrakhan; (4) Drug use and trafficking even at Detroit s WXYZ-TV Channel 7! (5)and Salvation, Deliverance, Healing and Restoration.

Reflections on Blaxploitation : Actors and Directors Speak / [interviewers] David Walker, Andrew J. Rausch, Chris Watson.  Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2009.  237pp.  Main Library PN1995.9.N4 R46 2009  :  "In the early 1970s, much of America - especially black America - was still dealing with the tumultuous 1960s. Out of this period came a new breed of film that would completely change the way African Americans were presented in movies, With afros picked to spherical perfection and guns blazing, big bad soul brothers and super sexy sisters lit up movie screens across the country, Never before had black men and women appeared on screen in quite this way. In time, these films would be dubbed "blaxploitation." Although film historians and fans have long debated exactly which film launched the blaxploitation era, the financial success of Melvin Van Peebles's Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song and Gordon Parks's Shaft helped open the floodgates for the more than two hundred films that are now considered blaxploitation." Reflections on Blaxploitation: Actors and Directors Speak is a collection of interviews with many of the men and women who defined the genre. In candid conversations, some of the most important figures of the era describe what it was like to work on these films and what impact they had on American culture, black and otherwise.  

Featured Books, S-T

Sag Harbor : A Novel / Colson Whitehead. New York : Doubleday, c2009. 273pp. Main Library PS3573.H4768 S35 2009  : The time is 1985. Benji, the son of a lawyer and a doctor, is one of the only black kids at an elite prep school in Manhattan. He spends his falls and winters going to roller-disco bar mitzvahs and trying desperately to find a social group that will accept him....But every summer, Benji and his brother, Reggie, escape to the East End of Sag Harbor, where a small community of African American professionals has built a world of its own. Except Benji is just as confused about this all-black refuge as he is about the white world he negotiates during the school year. He's hopelessly one step behind on every new dance, and his fantasies of hooking up are no match for his own awkwardness, not to mention his braces, his horrid father-cut Afro, or his secret Lite FM addiction....In this deeply affectionate and fiercely funny coming-of-age novel, Colson Whitehead—using the perpetual mortification of teenage existence and the desperate quest for reinvention—beautifully explores racial and class identity, illustrating the complex rhythms of the adult world.

The Sage Handbook of African American Education / Linda C. Tillman, editor.  Thousand Oaks, Calif. : Sage Publications, c2009.  599pp.  Main Library LC2717 .S34 2009 : A unique, comprehensive collection of theoretical and empirical scholarship in six important areas: historical perspectives, teaching and learning, PK-12 school leadership, higher education, current issues, and education policy. The purpose of the Handbook is to articulate perspectives on issues affecting the participation and leadership of African Americans in PK-12 and postsecondary education. This volume also addresses historical and current issues affecting the education of African Americans and discusses current and future school reform efforts that directly affect this group.

Schooling Citizens : the Struggle for African American Education in Antebellum America / Hilary J. Moss. Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2009. 274pp. Main Library LC2741 .M688 2009 :
While white residents of antebellum Boston and New Haven forcefully opposed the education of black residents, their counterparts in slaveholding Baltimore did little to resist the establishment of African American schools. Such discrepancies, Hilary Moss argues, suggest that white opposition to black education was not a foregone conclusion. Through the comparative lenses of these three cities, she shows why opposition erupted where it did across the United States during the same period that gave rise to public education....As common schooling emerged in the 1830s, providing white children of all classes and ethnicities with the opportunity to become full-fledged citizens, it redefined citizenship as synonymous with whiteness. This link between school and American identity, Moss argues, increased white hostility to black education at the same time that it spurred African Americans to demand public schooling as a means of securing status as full and equal members of society. Shedding new light on the efforts of black Americans to learn independently in the face of white attempts to withhold opportunity, Schooling Citizens narrates a previously untold chapter in the thorny history of America’s educational inequality.

Screens fade to black : contemporary African American cinema / David J. Leonard.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2006.  217pp.  Main Library PN1995.9.N4 L46 2006 : The triple crown of Oscars awarded to Denzel Washington, Halle Berry, and Sidney Poitier on a single evening in 2002 seemed to mark a turning point for African Americans in cinema. Certainly it was hyped as such by the media, eager to overlook the nuances of this sudden embrace. In this new study, author David Leonard uses this event as a jumping-off point from which to discuss the current state of African-American cinema and the various genres that currently compose it. Looking at such recent films as Soul Food, Antwone Fisher, Training Day, and the two Barbershop films-all of which were directed by black artists, and most of which starred and were written by blacks as well-author David Leonard examines the issues of representation and opportunity in contemporary cinema.

A Shadow on the Household : One Enslaved Family's Incredible Struggle for Freedom / Bryan Prince. Toronto, Ont. : McClelland & Stewart, c2009. 280pp. Main Library E444 .P75 2009 : Prior to abolition in 1865, as many as 40,000 men, women, and children made the perilous trip north from enslavement in the United States to freedom in Canada. Many were aided by networks that came to be known as the Underground Railroad. And the stories that emerge from the past about these journeys are truly remarkable....In A Shadow on the Household, Bryan Prince, a descendant of slaves, brings to life the heart-wrenching story of the Weems family and their struggle to liberate themselves from slavery. John Weems, a man who purchased his own freedom, paid the owner of his enslaved wife and eight children an annual fee to keep them together at one plantation. But when that owner died, the Weemses were cruelly separated and scattered throughout the South. Heartbroken and desperate, John resolved to raise the money to buy his family’s freedom and reunite them. Mining newspapers, private letters, diaries, estate records, marriage registries, and abolitionist papers for details of a story cloaked in secrecy, Bryan Prince has rescued the Weems family and their plight from historical oblivion....An unforgettable story of love and persistence, played out in four countries (the United States, Canada, Jamaica, and the United Kingdom) against the backdrop of the publication of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, a growing abolitionist movement, and the heroic efforts of the Underground Railroad, the Weems family saga must be read to be believed.

The Shadows of Youth : The Remarkable Journey of The Civil Rights Generation / Andrew B. Lewis.  New York : Hill and Wang, 2009.  356pp.  Main Library E185.615 .L47755 2009 : Through the lives of Diane Nash, Stokely Carmichael, Bob Moses, Bob Zellner, Julian Bond, Marion Barry, John Lewis, and their contemporaries, The Shadows of Youth provides a carefully woven group biography of the activists who—under the banner of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee—challenged the way Americans think about civil rights, politics, and moral obligation in an unjust democracy. A wealth of original sources and oral interviews allows the historian Andrew B. Lewis to recover the sweeping narrative of the civil rights movement, from its origins in the youth culture of the 1950s to the near present....The teenagers who spontaneously launched sit-ins across the South in the summer of 1960 became the SNCC activists and veterans without whom the civil rights movement could not have succeeded. The Shadows of Youth replaces a story centered on the achievements of Martin Luther King Jr. with one that unearths the cultural currents that turned a disparate group of young adults into, in Nash’s term, skilled freedom fighters. Their dedication to radical democratic possibility was transformative. In the trajectory of their lives, from teenager to adult, is visible the entire arc of the most decisive era of the American civil rights movement, and The Shadows of Youth for the first time establishes the centrality of their achievement in the movement’s accomplishments.

Shaping memories : reflections of African American women writers / edited by Joanne Veal Gabbin.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c2009.  245pp.  Main Library PS153.N5 S46 2009 : Offers short essays by notable black women writers--including poet Nikki Giovanni, novelist Paule Marshall, folklorist Daryl Cumber Dance, and more-- on pivotal moments that strongly influenced their careers, providing an overview of the formal concerns and thematic issues facing these writers.

Slavery's Constitution : From Revolution to Ratification / David Waldstreicher. New York : Hill and Wang, 2009. 195pp. MSU College of Law Library, Level 1 KF4545.S5 W347 2009 : Taking on decades of received wisdom, David Waldstreicher has written the first book to recognize slavery’s place at the heart of the U.S. Constitution. Famously, the Constitution never mentions slavery. And yet, of its eighty-four clauses, six were directly concerned with slaves and the interests of their owners. Five other clauses had implications for slavery that were considered and debated by the delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention and the citizens of the states during ratification. This “peculiar institution” was not a moral blind spot for America’s otherwise enlightened framers, nor was it the expression of a mere economic interest. Slavery was as important to the making of the Constitution as the Constitution was to the survival of slavery....By tracing slavery from before the revolution, through the Constitution’s framing, and into the public debate that followed, Waldstreicher rigorously shows that slavery was not only actively discussed behind the closed and locked doors of the Constitutional Convention, but that it was also deftly woven into the Constitution itself. For one thing, slavery was central to the American economy, and since the document set the stage for a national economy, the Constitution could not avoid having implications for slavery. Even more, since the government defined sovereignty over individuals, as well as property in them, discussion of sovereignty led directly to debate over slavery’s place in the new republic....Finding meaning in silences that have long been ignored, Slavery’s Constitution is a vital and sorely needed contribution to the conversation about the origins, impact, and meaning of our nation’s founding document.

Slaves to Fashion : Black Dandyism and the Styling of Black Diasporic Identity / Monica L. Miller. Durham : Duke University Press, 2009. 390pp. Main Library E185.89.F37 M55 2009 : Slaves to Fashion is a pioneering cultural history of the black dandy, from his emergence in Enlightenment England to his contemporary incarnations in the cosmopolitan art worlds of London and New York. It is populated by sartorial impresarios such as Julius Soubise, a freed slave who sometimes wore diamond-buckled, red-heeled shoes as he circulated through the social scene of eighteenth-century London, and Yinka Shonibare, a prominent Afro-British artist who not only styles himself as a fop but also creates ironic commentaries on black dandyism in his work. Interpreting performances and representations of black dandyism in particular cultural settings and literary and visual texts, Monica L. Miller emphasizes the importance of sartorial style to black identity formation in the Atlantic diaspora....Dandyism was initially imposed on black men in eighteenth-century England, as the Atlantic slave trade and an emerging culture of conspicuous consumption generated a vogue in dandified black servants. "Luxury slaves" tweaked and reworked their uniforms, and were soon known for their sartorial novelty and sometimes flamboyant personalities. Tracing the history of the black dandy forward to contemporary celebrity incarnations such as Andre 3000 and Sean Combs, Miller explains how black people became arbiters of style and how they have historically used the dandy's signature tools-clothing, gesture, and wit-to break down limiting identity markers and propose new ways of fashioning political and social possibility in the black Atlantic world. With an aplomb worthy of her iconographic subject, she considers the black dandy in relation to nineteenth-century American literature and drama, W.E. B. Du Bois's reflections on black masculinity and cultural nationalism, the modernist aesthetics of the Harlem Renaissance, and representations of black cosmopolitanism in contemporary visual art.

The Songs of Blind Folk : African American Musicians and the Cultures of Blindness / Terry Rowden. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2009. 171pp. Fine Arts Library Music Collection ML3556 .R68 2009 : The Songs of Blind Folk explores the ways that the lives and careers of blind and visually impaired African American musicians and singers have mirrored the changes in America's image of African Americans and the social positioning and possibilities of the entire black community. The book offers a historically grounded consideration of African American performers and their audiences, and the ways that blindness, like blackness, has affected the way the music has been produced and received. Author Terry Rowden considers the controversial nineteenth-century prodigy Blind Tom Bethune; blues singers and songwriters such as Blind Lemon Jefferson, who achieved an unprecedented degree of visibility and acceptance in the 1920s and '30s; spiritual and gospel musicians such as the Blind Boys of Alabama; celebrated jazz and rhythm and blues artists Art Tatum, Rahsaan Roland Kirk, and Ray Charles; and finally, perhaps the best known of all blind performers, Stevie Wonder.

Southern Horrors : Women and The Politics of Rape and Lynching / Crystal N. Feimster.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, c2009.  314pp.  HV6250.4.W65 F43 2009 : Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence....Pairing the lives of two Southern women—Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white women—Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women....Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

Speak like singing : classics of Native American literature / Kenneth Lincoln.  Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2007.  367pp.  Main Library PS153.I52 L55 2007 : Speak Like Singing focuses on early books of poetry and prose by select Native writers showcasing the distinct voices and tribal diversities of living Indians. Rather than scanning the new-day horizon, as in Native American Renaissance three decades ago, this study focuses on carefully chosen paradigms in working daylight....This is not a book about bygone ethnoliteracies in other tongues and times. Speak Like Singing offers a cross-cultural study of Native voices today as they speak through American literature, specifically the fusions of poetry and prose in Western English.

The spirit and the shotgun : armed resistance and the struggle for civil rights / Simon Wendt.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2007.  279pp.  Main LibraryE185.61 .W48 2007 : The Spirit and the Shotgun explores the role of armed self-defense in tandem with nonviolent protests in the African American freedom struggle of the 1950s and 1960s. Confronted with violent attacks by the Ku Klux Klan and other racist terrorists, southern blacks adopted Martin Luther King's philosophy of nonviolent resistance as a tactic, Wendt argues, but at the same time armed themselves out of necessity and pride. Sophisticated self-defense units patrolled black neighborhoods, guarded the homes of movement leaders, rescued activists from harm, and occasionally traded shots with their white attackers. These patrols enhanced and sustained local movements in the face of white aggression. They also provoked vigorous debate within traditionally nonviolent civil rights organizations such as SNCC, CORE, and the NAACP....This study reevaluates black militants such as Malcolm X and the Black Panther Party and also appraises largely unknown protective agencies in Tuscaloosa, Cleveland, and other locales. Not confined to one state, one organization, or the best-known activists, this is the first balanced history of armed self-defense that begins with the southern civil rights movement and ends with the Black Power era....Drawing on extensive research from a wide variety of sources to build his case, Wendt argues that during the Black Power years, armed resistance became largely symbolic and ultimately counterproductive to the black struggle--no longer coexisting with peaceful protest in “the spirit and the shotgun” philosophy that had served the southern movement so effectively. This is an essential volume for historians and students of the era.

Still Brave : The Evolution of Black Women's Studies / Stanlie M. James, Frances Smith Foster, Beverly Guy-Sheftall, editorsNew York, NY : Feminist Press, 2009.  444pp. Main Library E185.86 .S765 2009 :  A definitive guide to race and gender from the pioneers of black women's studies.

Stormy Weather : the Life of Lena Horne / James Gavin.  New York : Atria Books, 2009.  598pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML420.H65 G38 2009 :  At the 74th annual Academy Awards in 2002, Halle Berry thanked Lena Horne for paving the way for her to become the first black recipient of a Best Actress Oscar. Though limited, mostly to guest singing appearances in splashy Hollywood musicals, "the beautiful Lena Horne," as she was often called, became a pioneering star for African Americans in the 1940s and fifties. Now James Gavin, author of Deep in a Dream: The Long Night of Chet Baker, draws on a wealth of unmined material and hundreds of interviews - one of them with Horne herself - to give us the defining portrait of an American icon....Gavin has gotten closer than any other writer to the celebrity who has lived in reclusion since 1998. Incorporating insights from the likes of Ruby Dee, Tony Bennett, Diahann Carroll, Arthur Laurents, and several of Horne's fellow chorines from Harlem's Cotton Club, Stormy Weather offers a fascinating portrait of a complex, even tragic Horne - a stunning talent who inspired such giants of showbiz as Barbra Streisand, Eartha Kitt, and Aretha Franklin, but whose frustrations with racism, and with tumultuous, root-less childhood, left wounds too deep to heal. The woman who emerged was as angry as she was luminous....From the Cotton Club's glory days and the back lots of Hollywood's biggest studios to the glitzy but bigoted hotels of Las Vegas's heyday, this behind-the-scenes look at an American icon is as much a story of the limits of the American dream as it is a masterful, ground-breaking biography. 

Strategies For Survival : Recollections of Bondage in Antebellum Virginia / William Dusinberre.  Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009.  251pp.  Main Library E445.V8 D87 2009 : Strategies for Survival conveys the experience of bondage through the words of former slaves themselves. The interviews -- conducted in Virginia in 1937 by WPA interviewers -- are considered among the most valuable of the WPA interviews because in Virginia the interviewers were almost all African Americans; thus the interviewees almost certainly spoke more frankly than they would otherwise have done. Dusinberre uses the interviews to assess the strategies by which slaves sought to survive, despite the severe constrictions bondage imposed upon their lives. Religion and escape were common means of coping with the indignity of family disruption, contempt, and the harsh realities of slavery. However, while Dusinberre recognizes the creativity and variety of slaves' responses to oppression, he acknowledges the dispiriting realities of the limits of slave resistance and agency.

Strength in What Remains / Tracy Kidder. New York : Random House, c2009. 277pp. Main Library E184.B89 K53 2009 : The Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tracy Kidder returns with the extraordinary true story of Deo, a young man who arrives in America from Burundi in search of a new life. After surviving a civil war and genocide, he ekes out a precarious existence delivering groceries, living in Central Park, and learning English by reading dictionaries in bookstores until he begins to meet the strangers who will change his life, pointing him eventually in the direction of Columbia University, medical school, and a life devoted to healing.

The Suffering Will Not Be Televised : African American Women and Sentimental Political Storytelling / Rebecca Wanzo.  Albany, NY : State University of New York Press, c2009. 278pp.  EMain Library 185.86 .W355 2009 : Why do some stories of lost white girls garner national media headlines, while others missing remain unknown to the general public? What makes a suffering person legible as a legitimate victim in U.S. culture? In The Suffering Will Not Be Televised, Rebecca Wanzo uses African American women as a case study to explore the conventions of sentimental political storytelling—the cultural practices that make the suffering of some legible while obscuring other kinds of suffering. Through an examination of memoirs, news media, film, and television, Wanzo’s analysis reveals historical and contemporary tendencies to conflate differences between different kinds of suffering, to construct suffering hierarchies, and to treat wounds inflicted by the state as best healed through therapeutic, interpersonal interaction. Wanzo’s focus on situations as varied as disparities in child abduction coverage, pain experienced in medical settings, sexual violence, and treatment of prisoners of war illuminates how widely and deeply these conventions function within U.S. culture.
...“Tracing the invisibility of the suffering of African American women across media, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised offers an important analysis of the many ways in which African American women’s experiences have been excluded from narratives about social violence and victimization. Wanzo’s book serves as a reminder about the necessity of considering gender and race relationally for women’s studies, cultural studies, and studies of crime, media, and culture.”

The Supremes : a saga of Motown dreams, success, and betrayal / Mark Ribowsky.  Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, c2009. 440pp.  Browsing Collection (1 East) ML421.S86 R53 2009 : Drawing on intimate recollections from friends, family, and Motown contemporaries, Mark Ribowsky charts the Supremes’ meteoric rise and bitter disintegration. He sheds light on Diana Ross’s relationship with Berry Gordy and her cutthroat rise to top billing in the group, as well as Florence Ballard’s corresponding decline. He also takes us inside the studio, examining how timeless classics were conceived and recorded on the Motown “assembly line,” and considers the place of Motown in an era of cultural upheaval, when not being “black enough” became a fierce denunciation within the black music industry....Deftly combining personal testimony, history, and expert analysis, Ribowsky not only tells the full, heartbreaking story of the Supremes, but shows why Gordy’s revolutionary concept of “blacks singing white” was essential to the modern evolution of music.

Sweet Thunder : the Life and Times of Sugar Ray Robinson / Wil Haygood.  New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2009.  Browsing Collection (1 East) GV1132.R6 H39 2009 : Wil Haygood grounds the story of Sugar Ray Robinson’s spectacular rise to greatness firmly within the historical context of his lifetime: born in 1921, Robinson came of age when the country seethed with virulent racism. Detroit was his birthplace, but from the time he was young, Harlem was his home. It was there that he began boxing, at thirteen, and, in the 1940s and 1950s, became a staple figure, glamorous and electrifying, emerging as a powerful symbol of Black America....Among the great strengths of the book are the vivid descriptions of Sugar Ray’s unique blend of grace and ferocity in the ring. But with equal vividness, the author describes Robinson’s life outside the ring, weaving in portraits of Langston Hughes, Lena Horne, and Miles Davis—whose lives not only intersected with Sugar Ray’s but also contribute to the illumination of his moment in our cultural and political history....From scrappy street kid to cultural icon to the relative obscurity of his last years, Sugar Ray comes hauntingly and powerfully to life against the vivid backdrop of the world he captivated.

Telling histories : Black women historians in the ivory tower / edited by Deborah Gray White.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2008.  291pp.  Main Library E185.86 .T379 2008 : The field of black women's history gained recognition as a legitimate field of study late in the twentieth century. Collecting stories that are both deeply personal and powerfully political, Telling Histories compiles seventeen personal narratives by leading black women historians at various stages in their careers. Their essays illuminate how--first as graduate students and then as professional historians--they entered and navigated the realm of higher education, a world concerned with and dominated by whites and men. In distinct voices and from different vantage points, the personal histories revealed here also tell the story of the struggle to establish a new scholarly field....Black women, alleged by affirmative-action supporters and opponents to be "twofers," recount how they have confronted racism, sexism, and homophobia on college campuses. They explore how the personal and the political intersect in historical research and writing and in the academy. Organized by the years the contributors earned their Ph.D.'s, these essays follow the black women who entered the field of history during and after the civil rights and black power movements, endured the turbulent 1970s, and opened up the field of black women's history in the 1980s. By comparing the experiences of older and younger generations, this collection makes visible the benefits and drawbacks of the institutionalization of African American and African American women's history. Telling Histories captures the voices of these pioneers, intimately and publicly.

The Tempest tales / Walter Mosley.  Baltimore : Black Classic Press ; [Berkeley] : Distributed by Publishers Group West, 2008.  165pp.  Main Library PS3563.O88456 T46 2008 : Tempest Landry, an everyman African American, is “accidentally” killed by a cop. Denied access to heaven because of what he considers a few minor transgressions, Tempest refuses to go to hell. Stymied, Saint Peter sends him back to Harlem, where a guiding angel tries to convince him to accept Saint Peter's judgment, and even the Devil himself tries to win over Tempest’s soul. Through the street-smart Landry, Mosley poses the provocative question: Is sin for blacks the same as it is for whites? And who gets to decide?

Term Paper Resource Guide to African American History / Caryn E. Neumann. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009. 304pp. Main Library E184.7 .N47 2009 : Major help for African American history term papers has arrived to enrich and stimulate students in challenging and enjoyable ways. Students from high school age to undergraduate will be able to get a jump start on assignments with the hundreds of term paper projects and research information offered here in an easy-to-use format. Users can quickly choose from the 100 important events, spanning from the expansion of the slave trade to North America in 1581 to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Each event entry begins with a brief summary to pique interest and then offers original and thought-provoking term paper ideas in both standard and alternative formats that often incorporate the latest in electronic media, such as iPod and iMovie. The best in primary and secondary sources for further research are then annotated, followed by vetted, stable Web site suggestions and multimedia resources, usually films, for further viewing and listening. Librarians and faculty will want to use this as well.

Terror in the Heart of Freedom : Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South / Hannah Rosen.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2009.  407pp.  Main Library E185.2 .R75 2009 : The meaning of race in the antebellum southern United States was anchored in the racial exclusivity of slavery (coded as black) and full citizenship (coded as white as well as male). These traditional definitions of race were radically disrupted after emancipation, when citizenship was granted to all persons born in the United States and suffrage was extended to all men. Hannah Rosen persuasively argues that in this critical moment of Reconstruction, contests over the future meaning of race were often fought on the terrain of gender....Sexual violence—specifically, white-on-black rape—emerged as a critical arena in postemancipation struggles over African American citizenship. Analyzing the testimony of rape survivors, Rosen finds that white men often staged elaborate attacks meant to enact prior racial hierarchy. Through their testimony, black women defiantly rejected such hierarchy and claimed their new and equal rights. Rosen explains how heated debates over interracial marriage were also attempts by whites to undermine African American men's demands for suffrage and a voice in public affairs. By connecting histories of rape and discourses of "social equality" with struggles over citizenship, Rosen shows how gendered violence and gendered rhetorics of race together produced a climate of terror for black men and women seeking to exercise their new rights as citizens. Linking political events at the city, state, and regional levels, Rosen places gender and sexual violence at the heart of understanding the reconsolidation of race and racism in the postemancipation United States.

Thelonious Monk : The Life and Times of an American Original / Robin D.G. Kelley.  New York : Free Press, 2009.  588pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML417.M846 K46 2009 : His angular melodies and dissonant harmonies shook the jazz world to its foundations, ushering in the birth of "bebop" and establishing Monk as one of America's greatest composers. Yet throughout much of his life, his musical contribution took a backseat to tales of his reputed behavior. Writers tended to obsess over Monk's hats or his proclivity to dance on stage. To his fans, he was the ultimate hipster; to his detractors, he was temperamental, eccentric, taciturn, or childlike. Now, historian Robin D.G. Kelley brings to light a startlingly different Thelonious Monk--witty, intelligent, generous, politically engaged, brutally honest, and a devoted father and husband. This is the saga of an artist's struggle to "make it" without compromising his musical vision; a story that, like its subject, reflects the tidal ebbs and flows of American history in the twentieth century.

Those about him remained silent : the battle over W.E.B. Du Bois / Amy Bass.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2009.  198pp.  Main Library  E185.97.D73 B37 2009 : On the eve of Martin Luther King Jr.'s 1963 March on Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois died in exile in Ghana at the age of 95, more than a half century after cofounding the NAACP. Five years after his death, residents of Great Barrington, the small Massachusetts town where Du Bois was born in 1868, proposed recognizing his legacy through the creation of a memorial park on the site of his childhood home. Supported by the local newspaper and prominent national figures including Harry Belafonte and Sydney Poitier, the effort to honor Du Bois set off an acrimonious debate that bitterly divided the town. Led by the local chapter of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, opponents compared Du Bois to Hitler, vilifying him as an anti-American traitor for his communist sympathies, his critique of American race relations, and his pan-Africanist worldview....In Those About Him Remained Silent, Amy Bass provides the first detailed account of the battle over Du Bois and his legacy, as well as a history of Du Bois's early life in Massachusetts. Bass locates the roots of the hostility to memorialize Du Bois in a cold war worldview that reduced complicated politics to a vehement hatred of both communism and, more broadly, anti-Americanism. The town's reaction was intensified, she argues, by the racism encoded within cold war patriotism....Showing the potency of prevailing, often hidden, biases, Those About Him Remained Silent is an unexpected history of how racism, patriotism, and global politics played out in a New England community divided on how-or even if-to honor the memory of its greatest citizen.

The Ties That Bind : a Memoir of Race, Memory, and Redemption / Bertice Berry. New York : Broadway Books, c2009. 205pp. Main Library E185.96 .B46 2009 : When novelist Bertice Berry set out to write a history of her family, she initially believed she’d uncover a story of slavery and black pain, but the deeper she dug, the more surprises she found. There was heartache, yes, but also something unexpected: hope. Peeling away the layers, Berry came to learn that the history of slavery cannot be quantified in simple, black-and-white terms of “good” and “evil” but is rather a complex tapestry of roles and relations, of choices and individual responsibility....In this poignant, reflective memoir, Berry skillfully relays the evolution of relations between the races, from slavery to Reconstruction, from the struggles of the Civil Rights movement and the Black Power 1970s, and on to the present day. In doing so, she sheds light on a picture of the past that not only liberates but also unites and evokes the need to forgive and be forgiven.

Through It All : Reflections On My Life, My Family, And My Faith / Christine King Farris.  New York : Atria Books, 2009.  257pp.  Main Library E185.97.F374 A3 2009 : Christine King Farris, the only sister of Dr. King and his brother, A.D., is the surviving member of the family that together stood for the rights of all Americans at the forefront of the civil rights movement. They come from a long line of African Americans in the South who combined education and conviction not only to survive against the odds but to make life better for themselves and those around them, especially the poor. She offers a rare opportunity to learn more about the man behind the myth -- as she describes, Martin Luther King was "no saint, ordained as such at birth. Instead, he was an average ordinary man, called by a God, in whom he had deep and abiding faith, to perform extraordinary deeds."...The revelatory glimpses into her childhood with Dr. King are heartwarming. Her memories of, and insight into, her family's early years, including the brutal murder of their mother in church and the drowning of their youngest brother, are startling....Ms. Farris has led a fascinating life, not only as the sibling of one of America's most internationally celebrated leaders, but in her own right as a wife and mother, activist, and career educator who has put in more than fifty years of service at Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. Her children's book, My Brother Martin, was described by Kirkus Reviews as "a window to show Martin as a small boy in a loving extended family."...Through It All, Christine King Farris's first memoir, opens doors to let readers of all ages into her life, her family, and the faith that allows her, in the ninth decade of her life, to still stand for all the principles that make America great.

To Ask For An Equal Chance : African Americans in the Great Depression / Cheryl Lynn Greenberg.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2009.  187pp.  Main Library E185.6 .G79 2009 : Conventional US history mentions African Americans in relation to the Civil War and Reconstruction in the late 19th century, then again during the civil rights movement beginning in the 1950s; the Great Depression is part of another world, along with industrialization and world wars. Greenburg (history, Trinity College, Connecticut) points out that Black Americans also endured the lean years, and describes how. She looks at Black life before the crash, working, New Deals and raw deals, political organizing, and Black communities and Black culture,

To Tell the Truth Freely : the Life of Ida B. Wells / Mia Bay. New York : Hill and Wang, 2009. 374pp. Main Library E185.97.W55 B39 2009 : Born to slaves in 1862, Ida B. Wells became a fearless antilynching crusader, women’s rights advocate, and journalist. Wells’s refusal to accept any compromise on racial inequality caused her to be labeled a “dangerous radical” in her day but made her a model for later civil rights activists as well as a powerful witness to the troubled racial politics of her era. In the richly illustrated To Tell the Truth Freely, the historian Mia Bay vividly captures Wells’s legacy and life, from her childhood in Mississippi to her early career in late nineteenth-century Memphis and her later life in Progressive-era Chicago. Wells’s fight for racial and gender justice began in 1883, when she was a young schoolteacher who traveled to her rural schoolhouse by rail. Forcibly ejected from her seat on a train one day on account of her race, Wells immediately sued the railroad. Though she ultimately lost her case on appeal in the Supreme Court of Tennessee, the published account of her legal challenge to Jim Crow changed her life, propelling her into a career as an outspoken journalist and social activist. Also a fierce critic of the racial violence that marked her era, Wells went on to launch a crusade against lynching that took her across the United States and eventually to Britain. Though she helped found the NAACP in 1910 after resettling in Chicago, she would not remain a member for long. Always militant in her quest for racial justice, Wells rejected not only Booker T. Washington’s accommodationism but also the moderating influence of white reformers within the early NAACP. The life of Ida B. Wells and her enduring achievements are dramaticallyrecovered in Mia Bay’s To Tell the Truth Freely.

The Triumph of Voting Rights in the South / Charles S. Bullock III and Ronald Keith GaddieNorman : University of Oklahoma Press, c2009.  440pp.  Main Library JK1924 .B85 2009 : Political scientists Bullock (U. of Georgia) and Gaddie (U. of Oklahoma) examine southern voting-rights advances since passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, the translation of access into representation, and the evolution of southern politics in relation to the role of the minority electorate. The text is organized to assess progress in each of the 11 southern states in succession, starting with those that have been covered the longest by Section 5, those picked up by the 1975 amendments, and the two southern states not subject to preclearance. Also included are analyses of voting-rights progress across the region, racial progress in political participation, and the intersection of race and party in voting progress and in participation in the new, two-party South. For political scientists, historians, students, and general readers interested in southern politics and minority voting rights.

Featured Books, U-Z

The Unchosen Me : Race, Gender, and Identity Among Black Women in College / Rachelle Winkle-Wagner. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009. 227pp. Main Library LC2781 .W57 2009 : Racial and gender inequities persist among college students, despite ongoing efforts to combat them. Students of color face alienation, stereotyping, low expectations, and lingering racism even as they actively engage in the academic and social worlds of college life. The Unchosen Me examines the experiences of African American collegiate women and the identity-related pressures they encounter both on and off campus....Rachelle Winkle-Wagner finds that the predominantly white college environment often denies African American students the chance to determine their own sense of self. Even the very programs and policies developed to promote racial equality may effectively impose "unchosen" identities on underrepresented students. She offers clear evidence of this interactive process, showing how race, gender, and identity are created through interactions among one's self, others, and society....At the heart of this book are the voices of women who struggle to define and maintain their identities during college. In a unique series of focus groups called "sister circles," these women could speak freely and openly about the pressures and tensions they faced in school. The Unchosen Me is a rich examination of the underrepresented student experience, offering a new approach to studying identity, race, and gender in higher education.

The underground railroad on the western frontier : escapes from Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa and the territories of Kansas, Nebraska and the Indian nations, 1840-1865 / James Patrick Morgans.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., 2010.  221pp. Main Library E450 .M77 2010 : All along the mid-1800s Western frontier, the path of fugitive slaves in the Underground Railroad was filled with danger. An escapee who managed to avoid violence still was hard-pressed to survive in a place of frequent drought and illness, where newly settled sympathizers were often unable to give accurate descriptions of the topography, climate, or food sources. This book details the history and development of the Underground Railroad in Arkansas, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Nebraska, and Oklahoma. Topics include lesser known escape routes into Mexico and the American Indian nations, the sacking of Lawrence, Kansas, and guerilla warfare; escapees' use of steamboats along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers; and the activities of John Brown, James Montgomery, Dan Anthony, and others.

Unexpected places : relocating nineteenth-century African American literature / Eric Gardner.  Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, 2009.  258pp.  Main Library PS153.N5 G25 2009 : In this provocative and important study, Gardner (Saginaw Valley State Univ.) revises much of what the academy has understood about African American literature. He argues that scholars have defined 19th-century African American writing as "southern stories told in bound books that were written by blacks in the urban Northeast and published in one of the handful of urban Northeast centers of activism like New York, Philadelphia, and Boston." This, the author contends, has erased such black writings as Western narratives, free southern authors, and the general role of newspaper publishing. Unexpected Places asks readers to reconsider the scope and variety of 19th-century black writing by refocusing interest in periodical publications, which often were the only literary outlet non-eastern writers had, especially since they were composing works other than slaves' narratives. Gardner's arrangement is geographic: chapters treat such locations as St. Louis, Indiana, and northern California, sustaining the proposition that "affinities of place may well tell [the reader] much about questions of influence, composition, content, publication, and reception." The chapter on freedom lawsuits in St. Louis is particularly compelling for the way it expands knowledge of black lives and pursuits of freedom

Up From History : the Life of Booker T. Washington / Robert J. Norrell. Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2009. 508pp. Main Library E185.97.W4 N67 2009 : Since the 1960s, Martin Luther King, Jr., has personified black leadership with his use of direct action protests against white authority. A century ago, in the era of Jim Crow, Booker T. Washington pursued a different strategy to lift his people. In this compelling biography, Norrell reveals how conditions in the segregated South led Washington to call for a less contentious path to freedom and equality. He urged black people to acquire economic independence and to develop the moral character that would ultimately gain them full citizenship. Although widely accepted as the most realistic way to integrate blacks into American life during his time, Washington’s strategy has been disparaged since the 1960s....The first full-length biography of Booker T. in a generation, Up from History recreates the broad contexts in which Washington worked: He struggled against white bigots who hated his economic ambitions for blacks, African-American intellectuals like W. E. B. Du Bois who resented his huge influence, and such inconstant allies as Theodore Roosevelt. Norrell details the positive power of Washington’s vision, one that invoked hope and optimism to overcome past exploitation and present discrimination. Indeed, his ideas have since inspired peoples across the Third World that there are many ways to struggle for equality and justice. Up from History reinstates this extraordinary historical figure to the pantheon of black leaders, illuminating not only his mission and achievement but also, poignantly, the man himself.

Voices From Beneath the Veil : Analysis of the Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs of Middle Class African Americans / Michael E. Hodge. Lanham : University Press of America, c2009. 88pp. Main Library E185.86 .H63 2009 : This book is about race relations that tell the stories of successful African Americans as they negotiate through the turbulence of everyday life. The author conducted a national interview with over two hundred middle class African American respondents.

Voices of the African American Experience / edited by Lionel C. Bascom. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, c2009. 3 volumes. Main Library E184.6 .V65 2009 : This three-volume anthology presents readers with a road map of the struggle and triumphs in US history that eventually made the election of the first African-American president possible. The compilation of primary documents is broad in scope, spanning four centuries, which enhances its usefulness to undergraduate and graduate students of American history. Editor Bascom (Western Connecticut State Univ.) builds on and refreshes older compilations such as A Documentary History of the Negro People in the United States (1951-94), ed. by Herbert Aptheker; and The Voice of Black America: Major Speeches by Negroes in the United States, 1797-1973 (1975), edited by Philip Foner. Bascom animates the voices of the famous and the unknown in a way that is reminiscent of the style of his earlier work, A Renaissance in Harlem: Lost Voices of an American Community (1999). The documents are arranged in chronological order with brief introductions to most entries that add context and perspective. A table of contents for the entire work appears in each of the three volumes. The third volume features a chronology of significant events, a selected bibliography, and the index. Some of the oral histories in volume 3 are interviews with minor celebrities, a curious choice in an otherwise serious work.

Waiting for Lightning to Strike : the Fundamentals of Black Politics / Kevin Alexander Gray. Petrolia, Calif. : CounterPunch ; Edinburgh ; Oakland, Calif. : AK Press, 2008. 261pp. Main Library E185.615 .G73 2008 : Contents - The fundamentals of black politics -- Dixie 101 : South Carolina's heritage of slavery -- The intensification of racial solidarity in the 1990s in the guise of black nationalism -- The million man march : identity and race politics -- A call for a new anti-war movement -- Big Daddy and the plantation -- Soul brother? Bill Clinton and black America -- The legacy of Strom Thurmond -- The sun never sets : how did we become an outlaw nation? -- The packaging of Obama -- The black primary -- Race, class and art : hustle and flow -- Richard Pryor's mirror on America -- The soul will find a way -- Why does Barack Obama hate my family?

Walter White : the dilemma of Black identity in America / Thomas Dyja.  Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, c2008.  212pp.  Main Library E185.97.W6 D95 2008 : Once known as Mr. NAACP, Walter White and his contributions to African-American history have been lost in the margins of memory. Dyja offers a straightforward biography of the light-skinned, blue-eyed, blond-haired black man who served as executive secretary of the NAACP for the complex and pivotal decades from 1931 to 1955. White's daring made him an unparalleled investigator into the horrendous violence and systematic peonage that characterized the decades before WWII. His accomplishments were history making: desegregation of the armed forces owes a debt to his investigations into the treatment of black soldiers in Europe and the Pacific; the Legal Defense Fund owes much to White's focus on litigation. Usefully but often controversially, this man of few theories and many tactics, remained squarely, sanely and consistently down the middle for almost four decades and kept the NAACP along that same path. As in White's life, the NAACP holds the center, but Dyja attends to White's place as a writer of the Harlem Renaissance and to his more intimate life, including his last act—White's marriage to a white woman that, according to the author, cost him his place in history.

Want to Start a Revolution? : Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle / edited by Dayo F. Gore, Jeanne Theoharis, and Komozi Woodard.  New York : New York University Press, c2009.  353pp.  Main Library E185.615 .W328 2009 : The story of the black freedom struggle in America has been overwhelmingly male-centric, starring leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X, and Huey Newton. With few exceptions, black women have been perceived as supporting actresses; as behind-the-scenes or peripheral activists, or rank and file party members. But what about Vicki Garvin, a Brooklyn-born activist who became a leader of the National Negro Labor Council and guide to Malcolm X on his travels through Africa? What about Shirley Chisholm, the first black Congresswoman?...From Rosa Parks and Esther Cooper Jackson, to Shirley Graham DuBois and Assata Shakur, a host of women demonstrated a lifelong commitment to radical change, embracing multiple roles to sustain the movement, founding numerous groups and mentoring younger activists. Helping to create the groundwork and continuity for the movement by operating as local organizers, international mobilizers, and charismatic leaders, the stories of the women profiled in Want to Start a Revolution? help shatter the pervasive and imbalanced image of women on the sidelines of the black freedom struggle.

We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns : the Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi / Tracy Sugarman. Syruacuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, c2009. 332pp. Main Library E185.93.M6 S883 2009 : In 1966 Hill and Wang published Sugarman's Stranger at the Gates: A Summer in Mississippi. A journalist and illustrator, Sugarman provided an activist's perspective and analysis of preparing for and participating in the so-called Freedom Summer of 1964. His narrative and visual descriptions of the struggle for civil rights in the Mississippi delta are riveting. The present title revisits the topic. Indeed, the first two parts of the book condense the earlier work. But here Sugarman, who retains the blend of narrative and illustration, focuses on key individuals--black and white--who affected him. The most recognizable of these people is Fannie Lou Hamer, and her death in 1977 and Sugarman's decision to produce a documentary on her life unite part 3. The book's final segment evolves from Sugarman's return to the Mississippi delta in the fall of 2001. He reacquaints the reader with several members of the Freedom Summer cohort, and through exploring their memories assesses the personal and civic impacts of that noble crusade. Though the book lacks scholarly apparatus, it will interest those who wish to acquaint themselves with 20th-century southern history or the Civil Rights Movement. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower- and upper-division undergraduates; general readers.

We Shall Overcome To We Shall Overrun : the Collapse of the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power Revolt (1962-1968) / Hettie V. Williams. Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c2009. 110pp. Main Library E185.61 .W55 2009 : We Shall Overcome to We Shall Overrun uses the metaphor of a nervous breakdown to critique the collapse of the American Civil Rights Movement from a historical perspective. Focusing on the years 1962 to 1968, using a topical chronological approach, this work seeks to discuss the major organizations and personalities central to the African American freedom struggle in the 1960s with an emphasis on the debate over the meaning, the means, and the attainment of 'black power.' The five major national groups that made up the civil rights coalition ultimately divided and "broke-down" as concerns of strategy and methodology were compounded by questions of black identity. A nuanced interpretive psycho-intellectual history such as this seeks to redefine our understanding of the American Civil Rights Movement altogether.

W.E.B. Du Bois and the Sociological Imagination : a Reader, 1897-1914 / Robert A. Wortham, editor. Waco, Tex. : Baylor University Press, c2009. 431pp. Main Library E185.86 .W433 2009 : Introducing and presenting thirty core texts from the sociological writings of W. E. B. Du Bois, Robert Wortham's unique reader highlights Du Bois as a multifaceted researcher and thinker who, by attempting to approach African American social life from every angle, became a pioneer in American sociology....As this astute reader demonstrates, in addition to his profound contributions to our understanding of racial inequality in the United States, Du Bois made momentous advances in the areas of research methods, social problems, community studies, population studies, the sociology of religion, and crime and deviance. When sociology appeared to be heading toward a deductive methodology, Du Bois presented a strong argument for inductive methods, advocating for the use of a more interdisciplinary approach. Eventually, combining sociological perspectives with those of history and anthropology, he developed his landmark approach: methodological triangulation....In this long-overdue volume, Wortham showcases the enormous influence of Du Bois's wide-ranging sociological imagination. Organized into four major parts—"The Scientific Study of Society and Social Problems," "Social Structure and Social Processes," "Dimensions of Inequality," and "Social Dynamics"—the reader concludes with a complete biography of Du Bois' early sociological works.

What Comes Naturally : Miscegenation Law and The Making of Race in America / Peggy Pascoe.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  404pp.  MSU College of Law Library, Level 1, KF4755 .P37 2009 : A long-awaited history that promises to dramatically change our understanding of race in America, What Comes Naturally traces the origins, spread, and demise of miscegenation laws in the United States--laws that banned interracial marriage and sex, most often between whites and members of other races. Peggy Pascoe demonstrates how these laws were enacted and applied not just in the South but throughout most of the country, in the West, the North, and the Midwest. Beginning in the Reconstruction era, when the term miscegenation first was coined, she traces the creation of a racial hierarchy that bolstered white supremacy and banned the marriage of Whites to Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, and American Indians as well as the marriage of Whites to Blacks. She ends not simply with the landmark 1967 case of Loving v. Virginia, in which the Supreme Court finally struck down miscegenation laws throughout the country, but looks at the implications of ideas of colorblindness that replaced them. What Comes Naturally is both accessible to the general reader and informative to the specialist, a rare feat for an original work of history based on archival research.

"What Shall We Do With the Negro?" : Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America / Paul D. Escott. Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2009. 304pp. Main Library E457.2 .E73 2009 : Throughout the Civil War, newspaper headlines and stories repeatedly asked some variation of the question posed by the New York Times in 1862, "What shall we do with the negro?" The future status of African Americans was a pressing issue for those in both the North and in the South. Consulting a broad range of contemporary newspapers, magazines, books, army records, government documents, publications of citizens' organizations, letters, diaries, and other sources, Paul D. Escott examines the attitudes and actions of Northerners and Southerners regarding the future of African Americans after the end of slavery. "What Shall We Do with the Negro?" demonstrates how historians together with our larger national popular culture have wrenched the history of this period from its context in order to portray key figures as heroes or exemplars of national virtue....Escott gives especial critical attention to Abraham Lincoln. Since the civil rights movement, many popular books have treated Lincoln as an icon, a mythical leader with thoroughly modern views on all aspects of race. But, focusing on Lincoln's policies rather than attempting to divine Lincoln's intentions from his often ambiguous or cryptic statements, Escott reveals a president who placed a higher priority on reunion than on emancipation, who showed an enduring respect for states' rights, who assumed that the social status of African Americans would change very slowly in freedom, and who offered major incentives to white Southerners at the expense of the interests of blacks.Escott's approach reveals the depth of slavery's influence on society and the pervasiveness of assumptions of white supremacy. "What Shall We Do with theNegro?" serves as a corrective in offering a more realistic, more nuanced, and less celebratory approach to understanding this crucial period in American history.

When The Game Was Ours / Larry Bird & Earvin "Magic" Johnson ; with Jackie MacMullan. Boston : Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2009. 340pp.  Browsing Collection (1 East) GV884.A1 B47 2009 : From the moment these two players took the court on opposing sides, they engaged in a fierce physical and psychological battle. Their uncommonly competitive relationship came to symbolize the most compelling rivalry in the NBA. These were the basketball epics of the 1980s - Celtics vs Lakers, East vs West, physical vs finesse, Old School vs Showtime, even white vs black. Each pushed the other to greatness - together Bird and Johnson collected 8 NBA Championships, and 6 MVP awards and helped save the floundering NBA at its most critical time. When it started they were bitter rivals, but along the way they became lifelong friends....With intimate, fly-on-the-wall detail, When the Game Was Ours transports readers to this electric era of basketball and reveals for the first time the inner workings of two players dead set on besting one another. From the heady days of trading championships to the darker days of injury and illness, we come to understand Larry's obsessive devotion to winning and how his demons drove him on the court. We hear him talk with candor about playing through chronic pain and its truly exacting toll. In Magic we see a young, invincible star struggle with the sting of defeat, not just as a player but as a team leader. We are there the moment he learns he's contracted HIV and hear in his own words how that devastating news impacted his relationships in basketball and beyond. But always, in both cases, we see them prevail....A compelling, up-close-and-personal portrait of basketball's most inimitable duo, When the Game Was Ours is a reevaluation of three decades in counterpoint. It is also a rollicking ride through professional basketball's best times.

White Prescriptions? : the Dangerous Social Potential for Ritalin and Other Psychotropic Drugs to Harm Black Boys / Terence D. Fitzgerald. Boulder : Paradigm Publishers, c2009. 183pp. Main Library LC2779 .F58 2009 : For all the debates about black males and their role in American society, there has been little attention to a dangerous and growing trend: the overprescription of Ritalin and other behavioral drugs. This book reveals how and why black males are disproportionately targeted and controlled by American schools in ways that hamper and endanger their educational success. Fitzgerald shows how the government, medical practitioners, and the pharmaceuticals industry have facilitated this oppressive trend, setting it against a larger historical backdrop of racism in American education.

Womanist Forefathers : Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois / Gary L. Lemons. Albany : State University of New York Press, c2009.  221pp.  Main Library HQ1413.D695 L46 2009 : What role did African American men have in the early twentieth-century struggle for women’s suffrage? How is gender significant to the historical and contemporary struggles for African American liberation? In Womanist Forefathers, Gary L. Lemons examines the memoirs and political writings on women by Frederick Douglass and W. E. B. Du Bois, positioning these radical proponents of female equality as “womanist forefathers” to later generations of gender progressive black men. Lemons argues that the writings of Douglass and Du Bois, which merge confessional narrative with social criticism, demonstrate the power of pro-womanist thinking in the vision of racial uplift both men advanced. Womanist Forefathers then traces the lineage between these early African American activists to contemporary pro-feminist black men, many of whom have similarly combined analyses of the personal with the political to envision a black male brotherhood founded on womanist principles, free from nationalism rooted in patriarchy, heterosexism, and homophobia....“Lemons provides a deep historical inquiry into black male feminist origins. No one has asked in quite as compelling a manner what qualities or experiences help to produce black men who see women’s oppression as a devastating problem. Furthermore, his positioning of absent and problematic fathers as the origin of the investment in the mother that is then transformed into an abiding concern with women’s rights is brilliant.”

Would you like the experience? : blacks/whites in the South during segregation / by Lawrence Cade.  Baltimore : PublishAmerica, c2008.  244pp.  Main Library PS3603.A3735 W65 2008 : The story of a dynamic African-American family from North Carolina. Controversial, blunt, honest, and compelling, the men and women of the Callaway clan tell us what it is like to be black in the period of time between the Civil War and the late fifties. Would You Like the Experience? tells the story of the Callaways from the trenches. There is no editing for political correctness. It doesn’t hold back to paint a pretty picture. This story hits you full in the heart. The patriarch of the family dies while waiting for a room at a segregated hospital. A white man steps up to rescue a little boy from a mob when he makes the mistake of drinking from the wrong water fountain. A woman is forced to sleep with a man because she has no other way to secure her family’s needs. One brother murders another. Despite the KKK, white and black people have secret lives together. This is real life. Would You Like the Experience? belongs in libraries across the country. Its portrayal of reality goes far beyond the sanitized versions of history that fill our bookshelves. The book is perfect for any college course centered on our country’s history, politics, sociology, or ethnic studies. Yet, it’s an exciting read. Like To Kill a Mockingbird, it will become a favorite in the classroom.

Writing the future of Black America : literature of the hip-hop generation / Daniel Grassian.  Columbia : University of South Carolina Press, c2009.  200pp.  Main Library PS153.N5 G69 2009 : Writing the Future of Black America explores the work of eight representative African American writers of the hip-hop generation to assess their common themes and offer insights into contemporary race relations in America as expressed and challenged in their works. In this groundbreaking study, Daniel Grassian takes as his subjects a group of impressive novelists, essayists, poets, and playwrights - Paul Beatty, Trey Ellis, Terrence Hayes, Allison Joseph, Jake Lamar, Suzan-Lori Parks, Danzy Senna, and Colson Whitehead - to chart the depths of their literary work against that of their predecessors in the civil rights generation and their predominantly white contemporaries of Generation X....Although African American writers such as Toni Morrison, Maya Angelou, and Alice Walker have risen to mainstream prominence thanks to vehicles such as Oprah's Book Club, significantly less critical and commercial attention has been given to their proverbial literary offspring, those African American writers born in the 1960s and 1970s who are part of the hip-hop generation. Characterized by the pursuit of empowerment through hybridity, social criticism, and personal expression, hip-hop has become the music and culture of choice for a sizable portion of America, regardless of race or socioeconomic standing. Meanwhile the writers of this generation have received little serious critical attention, aside from singular book reviews and occasional essays. Grassian fills in a gap in the discourse with his thorough analysis of the works crafted by these eight distinguished hip-hop writers, and he makes a case for the validity and value of studying their sophisticated engagements with race in contemporary America. To that end he maps their writings against the larger field of African American literature and the larger-yet canon of American literature to show their distinctive contributions to each....Selected because their work addresses a broad range of African American life, these writers fathom such topics as what it means to be African American or multiethnic in an increasingly global society, what role art and literature play in affecting their communities, and what positive and negative authority has been assigned to popular culture (and hip-hop culture specifically) in modern African American life. Their responses are provocative and emblematic of the evolving attitudes expressed by the generation they represent. In this first critical appreciation of hip-hop writers, Grassian finds myriad social challenges faced by this generation of authors and thinkers, bur also definable elements of progress that they herald and continue to shape in ongoing racial struggles.

Wrong Place, Wrong Time : Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men / John A. Rich.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.  212pp.  Main Library E185.86 .R52 2009 : Medical school taught John Rich how to deal with physical trauma in a big city hospital but not with the disturbing fact that young black men were daily shot, stabbed, and beaten. This is Rich's account of his personal search to find sense in the juxtaposition of his life and theirs....Young black men in cities are overwhelmingly the victims -- and perpetrators -- of violent crime in the United States. Troubled by this tragedy -- and by his medical colleagues' apparent numbness in the face of it -- Rich, a black man who grew up in relative safety and comfort, reached out to many of these young crime victims to learn why they lived in a seemingly endless cycle of violence and how it affected them. The stories they told him are unsettling -- and revealing about the reality of life in American cities....Mixing his own perspective with their seldom-heard voices, Rich relates the stories of young black men whose lives were violently disrupted -- and of their struggles to heal and remain safe in an environment that both denied their trauma and blamed them for their injuries. He tells us of people such as Roy, a former drug dealer who fought to turn his life around and found himself torn between the ease of returning to the familiarity of life on the violent streets of Boston and the tenuous promise of accepting a new, less dangerous one....Rich's poignant portrait humanizes young black men and illustrates the complexity of a situation that defies easy answers and solutions.

"Yes We Can" : Barack Obama's Proverbial Rhetoric / Wolfgang Mieder.  New York : Peter Lang, 2009. 352pp.  Main Library E908.3 .M54 2009 : Mieder has written extensively about proverbs, and has analyzed how several previous US presidents used them. Here he turns to the latest holder of the office, pointing out and discussing both traditional proverbs that Obama has used or adapted, and those he has invented in his books and speeches throughout his political career. The topics include opportunity, family, his origins, Kenya, pseudo-proverbs, sport expressions, his keynote speech at the Democratic National Convention, his speech in Berlin on A World that Stands as One, and his inauguration address. He provides an index of proverbs and proverbial phrases.

Yes We Did? : From King's Dream to Obama's Promise / Cynthia Griggs Fleming. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, c2009. 281pp. Main Library E185.615 .F56 2009 : Barack Obama’s presidential victory demonstrated unprecedented racial progress on a national level. Not since the civil rights legislation of the 1960s has the United States seen such remarkable advances. During Obama’s historic campaign, however, prominent African Americans voiced concern about his candidacy, demonstrating a divided agenda among black political leaders....The assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. changed perceptions about the nature of African American leadership. In Yes We Did?, Cynthia Fleming examines the expansion of black leadership from grassroots to the national arena, beginning with Booker T. Washington and W. E. B. DuBois and progressing through contemporary leaders including Harold Ford Jr., Louis Farrakhan, Jesse Jackson Jr., and Barack Obama. She emphasizes socioeconomic status, female black leadership, media influence, black conservatism, and generational conflict....Fleming had unprecedented access to a wide range of activists, including Carol Mosley Braun, Al Sharpton, and John Hope Franklin. She deftly maps the history of black leadership in America, illuminating both lingering disadvantages and obstacles that developed after the civil rights movement. Among those interviewed were community activists and scholars, as well as former freedom riders, sit-in activists, and others who were intimately involved in the civil rights struggle and close to Dr. King. Their personal accounts reflect the diverse viewpoints of the black community and offer a new understanding of the history of African American leadership, its current status, and its uncertain future.

Your history : from the beginning of time to the present / by J.A. Rogers.  Baltimore, Md. : Black Classic Press, 1983.  95pp.  Main Library E185 .R56 1983 : First published in 1940, this is a unique history which chronicles the accomplishments and tenacity of Black men and women.

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Book Covers, T-Z


Telling histories : Black women historians in the ivory tower

Telling histories : Black women historians in the ivory tower


The Tempest tales

The Tempest tales


Term Paper Resource Guide to African American History

Term Paper Resource Guide to African American History


Terror in the Heart of Freedom : Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South

Terror in the Heart of Freedom : Citizenship, Sexual Violence, and the Meaning of Race in the Postemancipation South


Thelonious Monk : The Life and Times of an American Original

Thelonious Monk : The Life and Times of an American Original


Those about him remained silent : the battle over W.E.B. Du Bois

Those about him remained silent : the battle over W.E.B. Du Bois


Through It All : Reflections On My Life, My Family, And My Faith

Through It All : Reflections On My Life, My Family, And My Faith


The Ties That Bind : a Memoir of Race, Memory, and Redemption

The Ties That Bind : a Memoir of Race, Memory, and Redemption


To Ask For An Equal Chance : African Americans in the Great Depression

To Ask For An Equal Chance : African Americans in the Great Depression


To Tell the Truth Freely : the Life of Ida B. Wells

To Tell the Truth Freely : the Life of Ida B. Wells


The Triumph of Voting Rights in the South

The Triumph of Voting Rights in the South


The underground railroad on the western frontier : escapes from Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa and the territories of Kansas, Nebraska and the Indian nations, 1840-1865

The underground railroad on the western frontier : escapes from Missouri, Arkansas, Iowa and the territories of Kansas, Nebraska and the Indian nations, 1840-1865


Unexpected places : relocating nineteenth-century African American literature

Unexpected places : relocating nineteenth-century African American literature


Up From History : the Life of Booker T. Washington

Up From History : the Life of Booker T. Washington


Voices From Beneath the Veil : Analysis of the Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs of Middle Class African Americans

Voices From Beneath the Veil : Analysis of the Trials, Tribulations, and Triumphs of Middle Class African Americans


Voices of the African American Experience

Voices of the African American Experience


Waiting for Lightning to Strike : the Fundamentals of Black Politics

Waiting for Lightning to Strike : the Fundamentals of Black Politics


Walter White : the dilemma of Black identity in America

Walter White : the dilemma of Black identity in America


Want to Start a Revolution? : Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle

Want to Start a Revolution? : Radical Women in the Black Freedom Struggle


We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns : the Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi

We Had Sneakers, They Had Guns : the Kids Who Fought for Civil Rights in Mississippi


We Shall Overcome To We Shall Overrun : the Collapse of the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power Revolt (1962-1968)

We Shall Overcome To We Shall Overrun : the Collapse of the Civil Rights Movement and the Black Power Revolt (1962-1968)


What Comes Naturally : Miscegenation Law and The Making of Race in America

What Comes Naturally : Miscegenation Law and The Making of Race in America


"What Shall We Do With the Negro?" : Lincoln, White Racism, and Civil War America


When The Game Was Ours

When The Game Was Ours


Womanist Forefathers : Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois

Womanist Forefathers : Frederick Douglass and W.E.B. Du Bois


Would you like the experience? : blacks/whites in the South during segregation

Would you like the experience? : blacks/whites in the South during segregation


Writing the future of Black America : literature of the hip-hop generation

Writing the future of Black America : literature of the hip-hop generation


Wrong Place, Wrong Time : Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men

Wrong Place, Wrong Time : Trauma and Violence in the Lives of Young Black Men


"Yes We Can" : Barack Obama's Proverbial Rhetoric

>Yes We Can : Barack Obama's Proverbial Rhetoric


Yes We Did? : From King's Dream to Obama's Promise

Yes We Did? : From King's Dream to Obama's Promise


Your history : from the beginning of time to the present

Your history : from the beginning of time to the present


Michigan State University