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Michigan State University

African American Studies Research Guide: New Books, 2012-2013

Contents

A compilation of recent African American acquisitions by the MSU Libraries.

General Tips and Advice

  • Check the MSU Online Catalog for books, videos, and more.  Note that the MSU Online Catalog is a union catalog which includes the holdings of the Library of Michigan, the MSU College of Law Library, and other branches on our own campus.

  • Do a wider search using MelCat (a  network of participating Michigan libraries) or WorldCat (searches thousands of libraries). You can request non-MSU Library materials through interlibrary loan. NOTE: Not all materials listed in MelCat or WorldCat can be borrowed through interlibrary loan, but many can.

  • Don't forget to use the bibliographies in reference works, books, and articles to identify other resources on your topic.

Book Covers, A-B


African-Atlantic cultures and the South Carolina lowcountry

African-Atlantic cultures and the South Carolina lowcountry


African American faces of the Civil War : an album

African American faces of the Civil War : an album


African American Fraternities and Sororities : The Legacy and the Vision

African American Fraternities and Sororities : The Legacy and the Vision


African American identity : racial and cultural dimensions of the Black experience

African American identity : racial and cultural dimensions of the Black experience


Ain't scared of your jail : arrest, imprisonment, and the civil rights movement

Ain't scared of your jail : arrest, imprisonment, and the civil rights movement


The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom

The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom


The archaeology of antislavery resistance

The archaeology of antislavery resistance


Aretha Franklin : the queen of soul

Aretha Franklin : the queen of soul


An army of lions : the civil rights struggle before the NAACP

An army of lions : the civil rights struggle before the NAACP


Arrested justice : black women, violence, and America's prison nation

Arrested justice : black women, violence, and America's prison nation


Articulate while Black : Barack Obama, language, and race in the U.S.

Articulate while Black : Barack Obama, language, and race in the U.S.


Barack Obama : the story

Barack Obama : the story


Benjamin Elijah Mays, schoolmaster of the movement : a biography

Benjamin Elijah Mays, schoolmaster of the movement : a biography


Black against empire : the history and politics of the Black Panther Party

Black against empire : the history and politics of the Black Panther Party


The Black campus movement : Black students and the racial reconstitution of higher education, 1965-1972

The Black campus movement : Black students and the racial reconstitution of higher education, 1965-1972


The Black church and hip hop culture : toward bridging the generational divide

The Black church and hip hop culture : toward bridging the generational divide


Black cool : one thousand streams of Blackness

Black cool : one thousand streams of Blackness


Black ethnics : race, immigration, and the pursuit of the American dream

Black ethnics : race, immigration, and the pursuit of the American dream


Black Jews in Africa and the Americas

Black Jews in Africa and the Americas


Black-Latino relations in U.S. national politics : beyond conflict or cooperation

Black-Latino relations in U.S. national politics : beyond conflict or cooperation


Black patriots and loyalists : fighting for emancipation in the War for Independence

Black patriots and loyalists : fighting for emancipation in the War for Independence


Black politics today : the era of socioeconomic transition

Black politics today : the era of socioeconomic transition


The Black revolution on campus

The Black revolution on campus


Black women and politics in New York City

Black women and politics in New York City


Booker T. Washington rediscovered

Booker T. Washington rediscovered


Burnt cork : traditions and legacies of blackface minstrelsy

Burnt cork : traditions and legacies of blackface minstrelsy


Book Covers, C-L


Charles H. Thompson : policy entrepreneur of the Civil Rights movement,1932-1954

Charles H. Thompson : policy entrepreneur of the Civil Rights movement,1932-1954


Children of the changing South : accounts of growing up during and after integration

Children of the changing South : accounts of growing up during and after integration


The color of Christ : the Son of God & the saga of race in America

The color of Christ : the Son of God & the saga of race in America


Conflict : African American women and the new dilemma of race and gender politics

Conflict : African American women and the new dilemma of race and gender politics</


The courage to hope : how I stood up to the politics of fear

The courage to hope : how I stood up to the politics of fear


Crime and punishment in African American history

Crime and punishment in African American history


Crossing b(l)ack : mixed-race identity in modern American fiction and culture

Crossing b(l)ack : mixed-race identity in modern American fiction and culture


Desert rose : the life and legacy of Coretta Scott King

Desert rose : the life and legacy of Coretta Scott King


Detroit : race riots, racial conflicts, and efforts to bridge the racial divide

Detroit : race riots, racial conflicts, and efforts to bridge the racial divide


Devil in the grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the dawn of a new America

Devil in the grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the dawn of a new America


Early African American print culture

Early African American print culture


Encyclopedia of black radio in the United States, 1921-1955

Encyclopedia of black radio in the United States, 1921-1955


Envisioning emancipation : Black Americans and the end of slavery

Envisioning emancipation : Black Americans and the end of slavery


Eugene Kinckle Jones : the National Urban League and Black social work, 1910-1940

Eugene Kinckle Jones : the National Urban League and Black social work, 1910-1940


Faithful to the task at hand : the life of Lucy Diggs Slowe

Faithful to the task at hand : the life of Lucy Diggs Slowe


The fire of freedom : Abraham Galloway & the slaves' Civil War

The fire of freedom : Abraham Galloway & the slaves' Civil War


From Edward Brooke to Barack Obama : African American political success, 1966-2008

From Edward Brooke to Barack Obama : African American political success, 1966-2008


Go-go live : the musical life and death of a chocolate city

Go-go live : the musical life and death of a chocolate city


The Harlem Renaissance in the American West : the new Negro's western experience

The Harlem Renaissance in the American West : the new Negro's western experience


Harriet Tubman : freedom seeker, freedom leader

Harriet Tubman : freedom seeker, freedom leader


Help me to find my people : the African American search for family lost in slavery

Help me to find my people : the African American search for family lost in slavery


In the crossfire : Marcus Foster and the troubled history of American school reform

In the crossfire : Marcus Foster and the troubled history of American school reform


Jim Crow laws

Jim Crow laws


Jim Crow Wisdom : Memory and Identity in Black America since 1940

Jim Crow Wisdom : Memory and Identity in Black America since 1940


The King years : historic moments in the civil rights movement

The King years : historic moments in the civil rights movement


The land was ours : African American beaches from Jim Crow to the Sunbelt South

The land was ours : African American beaches from Jim Crow to the Sunbelt South


The Long Walk to Freedom: Runaway Slave Narratives

The Long Walk to Freedom: Runaway Slave Narratives


Looking for Leroy : illegible black masculinities

Looking for Leroy : illegible black masculinities


Featured Books, A-B

African-Atlantic cultures and the South Carolina lowcountry / Ras Michael Brown, Southern Illinois University.  New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2012.  296pp. Main Library BL2525 .B76 2012 : "African-Atlantic Cultures and the South Carolina Lowcountry examines perceptions of the natural world revealed by the religious ideas and practices of African-descended communities in South Carolina from the colonial period into the twentieth century. Focusing on Kongo nature spirits known as the simbi, Ras Michael Brown describes the essential role religion played in key historical processes, such as establishing new communities and incorporating American forms of Christianity into an African-based spirituality. This book illuminates how people of African descent engaged the spiritual landscape of the Lowcountry through their subsistence practices, religious experiences, and political discourse"

African American faces of the Civil War : an album / Ronald S. Coddington.  Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.  338pp. Main Library E540.N3 C64 2012 : A renowned collector of Civil War photographs and a prodigious researcher, Ronald S. Coddington combines compelling archival images with biographical stories that reveal the human side of the war. This third volume in his series on Civil War soldiers contains previously unpublished photographs of African American Civil War participants—many of whom fought to secure their freedom....During the Civil War, 200,000 African American men enlisted in the Union army or navy. Some of them were free men and some escaped from slavery; others were released by sympathetic owners to serve the war effort. African American Faces of the Civil War tells the story of the Civil War through the images of men of color who served in roles that ranged from servants and laborers to enlisted men and junior officers....Coddington discovers these portraits— cartes de visite, ambrotypes, and tintypes—in museums, archives, and private collections. He has pieced together each individual’s life and fate based upon personal documents, military records, and pension files. These stories tell of ordinary men who became fighters, of the prejudice they faced, and of the challenges they endured. African American Faces of the Civil War makes an important contribution to a comparatively understudied aspect of the war and provides a fascinating look into lives that helped shape America.

African American Fraternities and Sororities : The Legacy and the VisionLexington : University Press of Kentucky Feb. 2012.  2nd edition, 552pp.  Ebrary online title : The first African American fraternities and sororities were established at the turn of the twentieth century to encourage leadership, racial pride, and academic excellence among black college students confronting the legacy of slavery and the indignities of Jim Crow segregation. With a strong presence that endures on today's campuses, African American fraternities and sororities claim legendary artists, politicians, theologians, inventors, intellectuals, educators, civil rights leaders, and athletes in their ranks....In this second edition of African American Fraternities and Sororities: The Legacy and the Vision, editors Tamara L. Brown, Gregory S. Parks, and Clarenda M. Phillips have added new chapters that address issues such as the role of Christian values in black Greek-letter organizations and the persistence of hazing. Offering an overview of the historical, cultural, political, and social circumstances that have shaped these groups, African American Fraternities and Sororities explores the profound contributions that black Greek-letter organizations and their members have made to America....New in the second edition: Examination of the relationship between Christian values and organizational identity; Investigation of hazing rituals; Survey of academic performance in black Greek-letter organizations; Discourse on notions of masculinity in black Greek-letter organizations; Accounts of the professional lives of black Greek luminaries.

African American identity : racial and cultural dimensions of the Black experience / edited by Jas M. Sullivan and Ashraf M. EsmailLanham : Lexington Books, c2012.  441pp.  Main Library  E185.625 .A375 2012 : African American Identity: Racial and Cultural Dimensions of the Black Experience, edited by Jas M. Sullivan and Ashraf M. Esmail, is a multidisciplinary exploration of the African American racial identity. The contributors to this volume cover a broad spectrum of disciplines, exploring questions like what is racial identity, how do we quantify it, and what effects do racial identity have on psychological, political, educational, and health-related behavior.

Ain't scared of your jail : arrest, imprisonment, and the civil rights movement / Zoe A. Colley.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2013.  158pp.  Main Library  E185.615 .C6434 2013 : Imprisonment became a badge of honor for many protestors during the civil rights movement. With the popularization of expressions such as “jail-no-bail” and “jail-in,” civil rights activists sought to transform arrest and imprisonment from something to be feared to a platform for the cause....Beyond Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letters from the Birmingham Jail,” there has been little discussion on the incarceration experiences of civil rights activists. In her debut book, Zoe Colley does what no historian has done before by following civil rights activists inside the southern jails and prisons to explore their treatment and the different responses that civil rights organizations had to mass arrest and imprisonment....Colley focuses on the shift in philosophical and strategic responses of civil rights protestors from seeing jail as something to be avoided to seeing it as a way to further the cause. Imprisonment became a way to expose the evils of segregation, and highlighted to the rest of American society the injustice of southern racism....By drawing together the narratives of many individuals and organizations, Colley paints a clearer picture of how the incarceration of civil rights activists helped shape the course of the movement. She places imprisonment at the forefront of civil rights history and shows how these new attitudes toward arrest continue to impact contemporary society and shape strategies for civil disobedience.

American tapestry : the story of the black, white and multiracial ancestors of Michelle Obama / Rachel L. Swarns.  New York : Amistad, 2013, c2012.  391pp.  Main Library  E909.O24 S93 2013  :  Michelle Obama's family saga is a remarkable, quintessentially American story--a journey from slavery to the White House in five generations. In this prodigiously researched epic, New York Times correspondent Rachel L. Swarns traces that complex and fascinating tale--from the men who fought in the Revolutionary and Civil Wars, to the mothers and fathers who endured the horrors of slavery and the indignities of segregation to build a better future for their children--uncovering details about Mrs. Obama's black, white, and multiracial forebears that even the First Lady herself did not know. Though an intimate family history, American Tapestry is also the collective chronicle of our changing nation, a beautifully rendered and singularly inspiring story with resonance for us all.

The Amistad Rebellion: An Atlantic Odyssey of Slavery and Freedom /  Marcus Rediker. New York : Viking, 2012.  288pp.  Main Library  E447 .R44 2012 : On June 28, 1839, the Spanish slave schooner Amistad set sail from Havana on a routine delivery of human cargo. On a moonless night, the captive Africans rose up, killed the captain, and seized control of the ship. They attempted to sail to a safe port, but were captured by the U.S. Navy. Their legal battle for freedom made its way to the Supreme Court, where they were freed and eventually returned to Africa. The rebellion became one of the best-known events in the history of American slavery, celebrated in films and books--all reflecting the elite perspective of the judges, politicians, and abolitionists involved. In this highly original account, using newly discovered evidence, Marcus Rediker reclaims the rebellion for its true proponents: the African rebels who risked death to stake a claim for freedom. The successful Amistad rebellion changed the very nature of the struggle against slavery. As a handful of self-emancipated Africans steered their own course to freedom, they opened a way for millions to follow. This book honors their achievement.

The archaeology of antislavery resistance / Terrance M. Weik ; foreword by Michael S. Nassaney.  Gainesville : University Press of Florida, c2012.  193pp.  Main Library E450 .W398 2012 : In the days of slavery, people of African descent sought to protect their human rights, escape from bondage, and combat exploitation. Their actions varied across different settings and times, and included accommodation, collaboration, autonomy, and militancy. This volume focuses on the evolution of antislavery resistance by examining material culture, documents, oral traditions, and other evidence that illustrate how enslaved people fought for their freedom....Terrance Weik presents readers with case studies accumulated from the material record left by Maroons in the Americas, Black Seminoles, and the Underground Railroad. He specifically highlights the way archaeologists’ contributions have added to our understanding of struggles for freedom from slavery that were pursued by people of the African Diaspora in the Americas and their allies....Weik encourages readers to consider the global dimensions of antislavery resistance as well as issues that continue to spark debate today, including racism, cultural survival, self-determination, and inequality.

Aretha Franklin : the queen of soul / Mark Bego.  New York, N.Y. : Skyhorse Pub., 2012.  438pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Book Collection ML420.F778 B4 2012 : A frank examination of Aretha Franklin, Mark Bego’s definitivebiography traces her career accomplishments from her beginningsas a twelve-year-old member of a church choir in the early1950s, to recording her first album at the age of fourteen and signinga major recording contract at eighteen, right up through herheadline-grabbing 2010 health scare.Originally positioned to become a gospel star in her father’s Detroitchurch, Aretha had a privileged urban upbringing—stars suchas Mahalia Jackson, Dinah Washington, and Sam Cooke regularlyvisited her father, Rev. C. L. Franklin. It wasn’t long before she wascreating a string of hits, from “Respect” to “Freeway of Love,” andbecoming one of the most beloved singers of the twentieth century....This New York Times bestselling author’s detailed research includesin-person interviews with record producers Jerry Wexler, ClydeOtis, and Clive Davis, Aretha’s first husband, several of her singingstar contemporaries, and a rare one-on-one session with Arethaherself. Every album, every accolade, and every heart-breakingpersonal drama is examined with clarity and neutrality, allowingFranklin’s colorful story to unfold on its own. With two teenagepregnancies and an abusive first marriage, drinking problems, battleswith her weight, the murder of her father, and tabloid wars,Aretha’s life has been a roller coaster. This freshly updated and expandedbiography will give readers a clear understanding of whatmade Aretha Franklin the “Queen of Soul.”

An army of lions : the civil rights struggle before the NAACP / Shawn Leigh Alexander.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.  382pp.  Main Library E185.61 .A437 2012 : In January 1890, journalist T. Thomas Fortune stood before a delegation of African American activists in Chicago and declared, "We know our rights and have the courage to defend them," as together they formed the Afro-American League, the nation's first national civil rights organization. Over the next two decades, Fortune and his fellow activists organized, agitated, and, in the process, created the foundation for the modern civil rights movement....An Army of Lions: The Civil Rights Struggle Before the NAACP traces the history of this first generation of activists and the organizations they formed to give the most comprehensive account of black America's struggle for civil rights from the end of Reconstruction to the formation of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909. Here a host of leaders neglected by posterity—Bishop Alexander Walters, Mary Church Terrell, Jesse Lawson, Lewis G. Jordan, Kelly Miller, George H. White, Frederick McGhee, Archibald Grimké—worked alongside the more familiar figures of Ida B. Wells-Barnett, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, who are viewed through a fresh lens....As Jim Crow curtailed modes of political protest and legal redress, members of the Afro-American League and the organizations that formed in its wake—including the Afro-American Council, the Niagara Movement, the Constitution League, and the Committee of Twelve—used propaganda, moral suasion, boycotts, lobbying, electoral office, and the courts, as well as the call for self-defense, to end disfranchisement, segregation, and racial violence. In the process, the League and the organizations it spawned provided the ideological and strategic blueprint of the NAACP and the struggle for civil rights in the twentieth century, demonstrating that there was significant and effective agitation during "the age of accommodation."

Arrested justice : black women, violence, and America's prison nation / Beth E. Richie.  New York : New York University Press, c2012.  229pp.  Main Library HV6626.2 .R57 2012  : Black women in marginalized communities are uniquely at risk of battering, rape, sexual harassment, stalking and incest. Through the compelling stories of Black women who have been most affected by racism, persistent poverty, class inequality, limited access to support resources or institutions, Beth E. Richie shows that the threat of violence to Black women has never been more serious, demonstrating how conservative legal, social, political and economic policies have impacted activism in the U.S.-based movement to end violence against women. Richie argues that Black women face particular peril because of the ways that race and culture have not figured centrally enough in the analysis of the causes and consequences of gender violence. As a result, the extent of physical, sexual and other forms of violence in the lives of Black women, the various forms it takes, and the contexts within which it occurs are minimized—at best—and frequently ignored. Arrested Justice brings issues of sexuality, class, age, and criminalization into focus right alongside of questions of public policy and gender violence, resulting in a compelling critique, a passionate re-framing of stories, and a call to action for change. 

Articulate while Black : Barack Obama, language, and race in the U.S. / H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman ; foreword by Michael Eric Dyson.  New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  205pp.  Main Library PE3102.N42 A43 2012 : Barack Obama is widely considered one of the most powerful and charismatic speakers of our age. Without missing a beat, he often moves between Washington insider talk and culturally Black ways of speaking--as shown in a famous YouTube clip, where Obama declined the change offered to him by a Black cashier in a Washington, D.C. restaurant with the phrase, "Nah, we straight."...In Articulate While Black, two renowned scholars of Black Language address language and racial politics in the U.S. through an insightful examination of President Barack Obama's language use--and America's response to it. In this eloquently written and powerfully argued book, H. Samy Alim and Geneva Smitherman provide new insights about President Obama and the relationship between language and race in contemporary society. Throughout, they analyze several racially loaded, cultural-linguistic controversies involving the President--from his use of Black Language and his "articulateness" to his "Race Speech," the so-called "fist-bump," and his relationship to Hip Hop Culture....Using their analysis of Barack Obama as a point of departure, Alim and Smitherman reveal how major debates about language, race, and educational inequality erupt into moments of racial crisis in America. In challenging American ideas about language, race, education, and power, they help take the national dialogue on race to the next level. In much the same way that Cornel West revealed nearly two decades ago that "race matters," Alim and Smitherman in this groundbreaking book show how deeply "language matters" to the national conversation on race--and in our daily lives.

Barack Obama : the story / David Maraniss.  New York : Simon & Schuster, c2012.  641pp.  Main Library E908 .M368 2012  : In Barack Obama: The Story, David Maraniss has written a deeply reported generational biography teeming with fresh insights and revealing information, a masterly narrative drawn from hundreds of interviews, including with President Obama in the Oval Office, and a trove of letters, journals, diaries, and other documents....The book unfolds in the small towns of Kansas and the remote villages of western Kenya, following the personal struggles of Obama’s white and black ancestors through the swirl of the twentieth century. It is a roots story on a global scale, a saga of constant movement, frustration and accomplishment, strong women and weak men, hopes lost and deferred, people leaving and being left. Disparate family threads converge in the climactic chapters as Obama reaches adulthood and travels from Honolulu to Los Angeles to New York to Chicago, trying to make sense of his past, establish his own identity, and prepare for his political future....Barack Obama: The Story chronicles as never before the forces that shaped the first black president of the United States and explains why he thinks and acts as he does. Much like the author’s classic study of Bill Clinton, First in His Class, this promises to become a seminal book that will redefine a president.

Benjamin Elijah Mays, schoolmaster of the movement : a biography / Randal Maurice Jelks. Chapel Hill [N.C.] : University of North Carolina Press, 2012.  327pp.  Main Library LC2851.M72 J45 2012  : In this first full-length biography of Benjamin Mays (1894-1984), Randal Maurice Jelks chronicles the life of the man Martin Luther King Jr. called his "spiritual and intellectual father." Dean of the Howard University School of Religion, president of Morehouse College, and mentor to influential black leaders, Mays had a profound impact on the education of the leadership of the black church and of a generation of activists, policymakers, and educators. Jelks argues that Mays's ability to connect the message of Christianity with the responsibility to challenge injustice prepared the black church for its pivotal role in the civil rights movement....From Mays's humble origins in Epworth, South Carolina, through his doctoral education, his work with institutions such as the National Urban League, the NAACP, and the national YMCA movement, and his significant career in academia, Jelks creates a rich portrait of the man, the teacher, and the scholar. Benjamin Elijah Mays, Schoolmaster of the Movement is a powerful portrayal of one man's faith, thought, and mentorship in bringing American apartheid to an end.

Black against empire : the history and politics of the Black Panther Party / Joshua Bloom and Waldo E. Martin, Jr.   Berkeley : University of California Press, c2013   539pp.  Main Library E185.615 .B5574 2013 : In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality. Unlike the Civil Rights Movement that called for full citizenship rights for blacks within the U.S., the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the U.S. government and positioned itself as part of a global struggle against American imperialism. In the face of intense repression, the Party flourished, becoming the center of a revolutionary movement with offices in 68 U.S. cities and powerful allies around the world....Black against Empire is the first comprehensive overview and analysis of the history and politics of the Black Panther Party. The authors analyze key political questions, such as why so many young black people across the country risked their lives for the revolution, why the Party grew most rapidly during the height of repression, and why allies abandoned the Party at its peak of influence. Bold, engrossing, and richly detailed, this book cuts through the mythology and obfuscation, revealing the political dynamics that drove the explosive growth of this revolutionary movement, and its disastrous unraveling. Informed by twelve years of meticulous archival research, as well as familiarity with most of the former Party leadership and many rank-and-file members, this book is the definitive history of one of the greatest challenges ever posed to American state power.

Black asset poverty and the enduring racial divide / Lori Latrice Martin.  Boulder, Colo. : FirstForumPress, 2013.  239pp.  Main Library HC110.P6 M32 2013 : Martin (Africana studies, CUNY John Jay College of Criminal Justice) presents a comprehensive overview of the historical, sociological, political, geographical, and economic factors affecting wealth inequality among blacks and between races. In particular, she focuses on asset wealth and the over-representation of blacks among the asset poor. She argues that we do not live in a post-racial society and that racial inequality is perhaps greater than ever. She goes back as far as the antebellum period, but focuses on New York City geographically. She reviews the literature on asset poverty and wealth inequality in general and addresses what she finds lacking or inaccurate. She considers only blacks descended from the Caribbean and Africa, but to this end interrogates the idea that black migrants have a better shot than natives. She concludes with a discussion of methodological, policy and theoretical implications and suggestions for more research.

The Black campus movement : Black students and the racial reconstitution of higher education, 1965-1972 / Ibram H. Rogers.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2012.  235pp.  Main Library LC2781 .R65 2012 : Between 1965 and 1972, African American students at upwards of a thousand historically black and white American colleges and universities organized, demanded, and protested for Black Studies, Black universities, new faces, new ideas—a relevant, diverse higher education. Black power inspired these black students, who were supported by white, Latino, Chicana, Asian American, and Native American students.The Black Campus Movement provides the first national study of this intense and challenging struggle which disrupted and refashioned institutions in almost every state. This book also illuminates the complex context for one of the most transformative educational movements in American history through a history of black higher education and black student activism before 1965.

The Black church and hip hop culture : toward bridging the generational divide / edited by Emmett G. Price III.  Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2012.  208pp.  Main Library BR563.N4 B5645 2012 : In this collection of provocative essays, leading thinkers, preachers, and scholars from around the country challenge both the Black church and the hip-hop generation to realize their shared responsibilities to one another and to the greater society.

Black cool : one thousand streams of Blackness / edited by Rebecca Walker.  Berkeley, Calif. : Soft Skull Press, c2012.  164pp. Main Library  E185.625 .B53 2012 : Black Cool explores the ineffable state and aesthetic of Black Cool. From the effortless reserve of Miles Davis in khakis on an early album cover, to the shock of resistance in black women’s fashion from Angela Davis to Rihanna, to the cadence of poets as diverse as Staceyann Chin and Audre Lorde, Black Cool looks at the roots of Black Cool and attempts to name elements of the phenomena that have emerged to shape the global expectation of cool itself....Buoyed by some of America’s most innovative thinkers on the subject?graphic novelist Mat Johnson, Brown University Professor of African Studies Tricia Rose, critical thinking and cultural icon bell hooks, Macarthur winner Kara Walker, and many more?the book is at once a handbook, a map, a journey into the matrix of another cosmology. It’s a literal periodic table of cool, wherein each writer names and defines their element of choice. Dream Hampton writes about Audacity. Helena Andrews about Reserve, Margo Jefferson on Eccentricity, Veronica Chambers on Genius, and so on. With a foreword by Henry Louis Gates that bridges historical African elements of cool with the path laid out for the future, Black Cool offers a provocative perspective on this powerful cultural legacy.

Black ethnics : race, immigration, and the pursuit of the American dream / Christina M. Greer.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2013.  212pp.  Main Library E185.625 .G64 2013 : In an age where racial and ethnic identity intersect, intertwine, and interact in increasingly complex ways, Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream offers a superb and rigorous analysis of black politics and coalitions in the post-Civil Rights era.

Black Jews in Africa and the Americas / Tudor Parfitt.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2013.  225pp.  Main Library  DS135.A25 P368 2013 : Black Jews in Africa and the Americas tells the fascinating story of how the Ashanti, Tutsi, Igbo, Zulu, Beta Israel, Maasai, and many other African peoples came to think of themselves as descendants of the ancient tribes of Israel. Pursuing medieval and modern European race narratives over a millennium in which not only were Jews cast as black but black Africans were cast as Jews, Tudor Parfitt reveals a complex history of the interaction between religious and racial labels and their political uses....For centuries, colonialists, travelers, and missionaries, in an attempt to explain and understand the strange people they encountered on the colonial frontier, labeled an astonishing array of African tribes, languages, and cultures as Hebrew, Jewish, or Israelite. Africans themselves came to adopt these identities as their own, invoking their shared histories of oppression, imagined blood-lines, and common traditional practices as proof of a racial relationship to Jews....Beginning in the post-slavery era, contacts between black Jews in America and their counterparts in Africa created powerful and ever-growing networks of black Jews who struggled against racism and colonialism. A community whose claims are denied by many, black Jews have developed a strong sense of who they are as a unique people. In Parfitt’s telling, forces of prejudice and the desire for new racial, redemptive identities converge, illuminating Jewish and black history alike in novel and unexplored ways.

Black-Latino relations in U.S. national politics : beyond conflict or cooperation / Rodney E. Hero, Robert R. Preuhs.  Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.  252pp.  Main Library  E185.615 .H39 2013 : "Social science research has frequently found conflict between Latinos and African Americans in urban politics and governance, as well as in the groups' attitudes toward one another. Rodney E. Hero and Robert R. Preuhs analyze whether conflict between these two groups is also found in national politics. Based on extensive evidence on the activities of minority advocacy group in national politics and the behavior of minority members of Congress, the authors find the relationship between the groups is characterized mainly by non-conflict and a considerable degree of independence. The question of why there appears to be little minority intergroup conflict at the national level of government is also addressed. This is the first systematic study of Black-Latino intergroup relations at the national level of United States politics"

Black mayors, White majorities : the balancing act of racial politics / Ravi K. Perry.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, [2013]   323pp.  Main Library  E185.615 .P434 2013 : Recent years have seen an increase in the number of African Americans elected to political office in cities where the majority of their constituents are not black. In the past, the leadership of black politicians was characterized as either “deracialized” or “racialized”—that is, as either focusing on politics that transcend race or as making black issues central to their agenda. Today many African American politicians elected to offices in non-majority-black cities are adopting a strategy that universalizes black interests as intrinsically relevant to the needs of their entire constituency....In Black Mayors, White Majorities Ravi K. Perry explores the conditions in which black mayors of majority-white cities are able to represent black interests and whether blacks’ historically high expectations for black mayors are being realized. Perry uses Toledo and Dayton, Ohio, as case studies, and his analysis draws on interviews with mayors and other city officials, business leaders, and heads of civic organizations, in addition to official city and campaign documents and newspapers. Perry also analyzes mayoral speeches, the 2001 ward-level election results, and city demographics. Black Mayors, White Majorities encourages readers to think beyond the black-white dyad and instead to envision policies that can serve constituencies with the greatest needs as well as the general public.*

Black patriots and loyalists : fighting for emancipation in the War for Independence / Alan Gilbert.  Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2012.  369pp.  Main Library E269.N3 G55 2012  : We commonly think of the American Revolution as simply the war for independence from British colonial rule. But, of course, that independence actually applied to only a portion of the American population—African Americans would still be bound in slavery for nearly another century. In Black Patriots and Loyalists, Alan Gilbert asks us to rethink what we know about the Revolutionary War, to realize that while white Americans were fighting for their freedom, black Americans were joining the British imperial forces to gain theirs. There were actually two wars being waged at once: a political revolution for independence from Britain and a social revolution for emancipation and equality....Drawing upon recently discovered archival material, Gilbert traces the intense imperial and patriot rivalry over recruitment and emancipation that led both sides to depend on blacks. As well, he presents persuasive evidence that slavery could have been abolished during the Revolution itself if either side had fully pursued the military advantage of freeing slaves and pressing them into combat—as when Washington formed the all-black and Native American First Rhode Island Regimen and Lord Dunmore freed slaves and indentured servants to fight for the British. Gilbert’s extensive research reveals that free blacks on both sides played a crucial and underappreciated role in the actual fighting. Black Patriots and Loyalists contends that the struggle for emancipation was not only basic to the Revolution itself, but was a rousing force that would inspire freedom movements like the abolition societies of the North and the black loyalist pilgrimages for freedom in places such as Nova Scotia and Sierra Leone....In this thought-provoking history, Gilbert illuminates how the fight for abolition and equality—not just for the independence of the few but for the freedom and self-government of the many—has been central to the American story from its inception.

Black politics today : the era of socioeconomic transition / Theodore J. Davis Jr.  New York : Routledge, 2012.  183pp.  Main Library E185.615 .D386 2012 : The late 1980s ushered in a new era of black politics, the socioeconomic transition era. Coming on the heels of the protest era and politics era, the current stage is characterized by the emergence of a new black middle class that came of age after the Civil Rights struggle. Although class still isn’t a strong factor in the external politics of the black community, it is increasingly a wedge issue in the community’s internal politics. Black politics today is increasingly less about the interest of the larger group and more about the interest of smaller subgroups within the community....Theodore J. Davis Jr. argues that the greatest threat to the social and political cohesiveness of the so-called black community may be the rise of a socially and economically privileged group among the ranks of black America. This rift has affected blacks’ ability to organize effectively and influence politics. Davis traces the changes in economic status, public opinion, political power and participation, and leadership over three generations of black politics. The result is an insightful analysis of black politics today.

The Black revolution on campus / Martha Biondi.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2012.  356pp.  Main Library LC2781 .B38 2012  : The Black Revolution on Campus is the definitive account of an extraordinary but forgotten chapter of the black freedom struggle. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Black students organized hundreds of protests that sparked a period of crackdown, negotiation, and reform that profoundly transformed college life. At stake was the very mission of higher education. Black students demanded that public universities serve their communities; that private universities rethink the mission of elite education; and that black colleges embrace self-determination and resist the threat of integration. Most crucially, black students demanded a role in the definition of scholarly knowledge....Martha Biondi masterfully combines impressive research with a wealth of interviews from participants to tell the story of how students turned the slogan "black power" into a social movement. Vividly demonstrating the critical linkage between the student movement and changes in university culture, Biondi illustrates how victories in establishing Black Studies ultimately produced important intellectual innovations that have had a lasting impact on academic research and university curricula over the past 40 years. This book makes a major contribution to the current debate on Ethnic Studies, access to higher education, and opportunity for all.

Black women and politics in New York City / Julie A. Gallagher.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.  249pp.  Main Library E185.93.N56 G35 2012 : Julie A. Gallagher documents six decades of politically active black women in New York City who waged struggles for justice, rights, and equality not through grassroots activism but through formal politics. In tracing the paths of black women activists from women's clubs and civic organizations to national politics--including appointments to presidential commissions, congressional offices, and even a presidential candidacy--Gallagher also articulates the vision of politics the women developed and its influence on the Democratic party and its policies. Deftly examining how race, gender, and the structure of the state itself shape outcomes, she exposes the layers of power and discrimination at work in all sectors of U.S. society.

Booker T. Washington rediscovered / edited by Michael Scott Bieze and Marybeth Gasman.  Baltimore : The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.  265pp.  Main Library E185.97.W4 B673 2012 : Booker T. Washington, a founding father of African American education in the United States, has long been studied, revered, and reviled by scholars and students. Born into slavery, freed and raised in the Reconstruction South, and active in educational reform through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Washington sought to use education to bridge the nation’s racial divide. This volume explores Washington’s life and work through his writings and speeches....Drawing on previously unpublished writings, hard-to-find speeches and essays, and other primary documents from public and private collections, Michael Scott Bieze and Marybeth Gasman provide a balanced and insightful look at this controversial and sometimes misunderstood leader. Their essays follow key themes in Washington’s life—politics, aesthetics, philanthropy, religion, celebrity, race, and education—that show both his range of thought and the evolution of his thinking on topics vital to African Americans at the time. Wherever possible, the book reproduces archival material in its original form, aiding the reader in delving more deeply into the primary sources, while the accompanying introductions and analyses by Bieze and Gasman provide rich context. A companion website contains additional primary source documents and suggested classroom exercises and teaching aids....Innovative and multifaceted, Booker T. Washington Rediscovered provides the opportunity to experience Washington’s work as he intended and examines this turn-of-the-century pioneer in his own right, not merely in juxtaposition with W. E. B. Du Bois and other black leaders.

Burnt cork : traditions and legacies of blackface minstrelsy / edited by Stephen Johnson.  Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, c2012.  266pp.  Main Library PN1969.M5 B87 2012 : Beginning in the 1830s and continuing for more than a century, blackface minstrelsy stage performances that claimed to represent the culture of black Americans remained arguably the most popular entertainment in North America. A renewed scholarly interest in this contentious form of entertainment has produced studies treating a range of issues: its contradictory depictions of class, race, and gender; its role in the development of racial stereotyping; and its legacy in humor, dance, and music, and in live performance, film, and television. The style and substance of minstrelsy persist in popular music, tap and hip-hop dance, the language of the standup comic, and everyday rituals of contemporary culture. The blackface makeup all but disappeared for a time, though its influence never diminished and recently, even the makeup has been making a comeback....This collection of original essays brings together a group of prominent scholars of blackface performance to reflect on this complex and troublesome tradition.

Featured Books, C-E

Charles H. Thompson : policy entrepreneur of the Civil Rights movement,1932-1954 / Louis Ray.  Madison, N.J. : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2012.  201pp.  Main Library LA2317.T4878 R39 2012 : During the era of segregation, the Journal of Negro Education published research vital to overturning racial segregation as public policy. Its founder, Charles Thompson’s editorials inspired and mobilized activists, slowly molding public support for human rights. A major college administrator and expert witness for the NAACP, Thompson chronicled the highs and lows of the civil rights struggle and African-American teachers’ central role in the struggle for equality.

Children of the changing South : accounts of growing up during and after integration / edited by Foster Dickson ; afterword by David Molina.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co., c2012.  189pp.  Main Library HQ792.U5 C4335 2012 : Although much attention has been paid to the adults who led, participated in, or witnessed the civil rights movement, much less attention has been given to those who were children during that era. Especially in the South, these children of the 1950s and afterward came of age in the midst of major societal shifts regarding race, gender, social class, and industry as the South re-branded itself the "Sun Belt." In this collection of memoirs, writers, teachers, scholars and historians recall growing up in the South from the late 1950s to the early 1990s, revealing how the region changed over time, as well as how a Southern childhood varied across time, race, gender, socio-economic status, and geography. By viewing these remembrances through the lens of multiculturalism, this collection offers anuanced understanding of how the pre-civil rights movement South evolved into the South of the 21st century.

The color of Christ : the Son of God & the saga of race in America / Edward J. Blum, Paul Harvey.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  340pp.  Main Library BR515 .B59 2012 : How is it that in America the image of Jesus Christ has been used both to justify the atrocities of white supremacy and to inspire the righteousness of civil rights crusades? In The Color of Christ, Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey weave a tapestry of American dreams and visions--from witch hunts to web pages, Harlem to Hollywood, slave cabins to South Park, Mormon revelations to Indian reservations--to show how Americans remade the Son of God visually time and again into a sacred symbol of their greatest aspirations, deepest terrors, and mightiest strivings for racial power and justice....The Color of Christ uncovers how, in a country founded by Puritans who destroyed depictions of Jesus, Americans came to believe in the whiteness of Christ. Some envisioned a white Christ who would sanctify the exploitation of Native Americans and African Americans and bless imperial expansion. Many others gazed at a messiah, not necessarily white, who was willing and able to confront white supremacy. The color of Christ still symbolizes America's most combustible divisions, revealing the power and malleability of race and religion from colonial times to the presidency of Barack Obama.

Conflict : African American women and the new dilemma of race and gender politics / Cindy Hooper.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2012.  169pp.  E185.86 .H744 2012 : Independent scholar Cindy Hooper has created a book for general readers with an interest in race, gender, or U.S. politics from other perspectives than academic theory. The book has three main points of focus. The first looks at the history of black women in political office in America, and the political identity of Americans who are considered to belong to two different groups: "women," and "blacks." The second is to show that African-American women, as a specific voting bloc of their own, can influence the outcome of elections in the United States. The third is to look at what that fact might mean for politics in America. The writing is smart, strong, and accessible. Occasionally the book's twin aims of statistical proof and conversation get in each other's way. When this happens the author usually errs on the side of conversation, which makes for a less rigorous analysis but a more interesting read. Some of the statistical points are compelling, and she makes a strong argument that African-American women form a voting bloc with strikingly consistent Democratic voting patterns and unusually high voter turnout, and the 2008 presidential election showed that these factors aren't simply reducible to either "black" or "women's" voting patterns. So in any election where the white vote is divided or a swing vote is important, the author argues that African-American women have significant power for political influence on a national level. The book tries to define a political identity and role for African-American women in the U.S., and within the range of its subject (electoral politics for general readers), it succeeds in setting up an interesting and important conversation.

The Cosby cohort : blessings and burdens of growing up Black middle class / Cherise A. Harris.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2013.  243pp.  on order : The Cosby Cohort examines the now-grown children who were raised in the black middle class. This probing book studies how their parents established their middle class position, how they interact with white America, the pressures placed upon them by their parents, how they connect with African Americans of other social classes, and more. Even though these young African Americans grew up watching The Cosby Show, as the book reveals, their stories reveal a much more complex reality than portrayed by the show.

The courage to hope : how I stood up to the politics of fear / Shirley Sherrod ; with Catherine Whitney.  New York : Atria Books, 2012.  240pp.  Main Library E901.1.S54 A3 2012 : In the summer of 2010, Shirley Sherrod was catapulted into a media storm that blew apart her life and her job doing what she’d done for decades: helping poor, hardworking people live the American dream. She was a lifelong activist who served as Georgia’s first black director of rural development....A right-wing blogger, the now late Andrew Breitbart, disseminated a video clip of a speech Sherrod had given to the Georgia NAACP, intending to make her an example of “reverse racism.” The right-wing media ramped up the outrage, and before Sherrod had a chance to defend herself, the Obama administration demanded her resignation. Then, after hearing from Sherrod herself and learning the entire truth of what she said in that speech, the administration tried to backtrack. As public officials and media professionals admitted to being duped and apologized for their rush to judgment, Sherrod found herself the subject of a teachable moment....The Courage to Hope addresses this regret-table episode in American politics, but it also tells Sherrod’s own story of growing up on a farm in southwest Georgia during the final violent years of Jim Crow. As a child she dreamed of leaving the South, but when her father was murdered by a white neighbor who was never brought to justice, Sherrod made a vow to stay in Georgia and commit herself to the cause of truth and racial healing. With her husband, Charles, a legend in the civil rights movement, she has devoted her life to empowering poor people and rural communities—Americans who are most in need....The incident that brought Sherrod into the spotlight does not define her life and work, but it strengthens her commitment to stand against the politics of fear and have the courage to hope.

Crime and punishment in African American history / by James Campbell.  New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.  263pp.  Main Library HV9466 .C36 2013 : An in-depth survey of crime, punishment and justice in African American history. Presenting cutting-edge scholarship on issues of criminal justice in African American history in an accessible way for students, he makes connections between black experiences of criminal justice and violence from the slave era to the present.

Crossing b(l)ack : mixed-race identity in modern American fiction and culture / Sika A. Dagbovie-Mullins.  Knoxville : University of Tennessee Press, c2013.  171pp. Main Library PS374.N4 D34 2013 : The past two decades have seen a growing influx of biracial discourse in fiction, memoir, and theory, and since the 2008 election of Barack Obama to the presidency, debates over whether America has entered a “post-racial” phase have set the media abuzz. In this penetrating and provocative study, Sika A. Dagbovie-Mullins adds a new dimension to this dialogue as she investigates the ways in which various mixed-race writers and public figures have redefined both “blackness” and “whiteness” by invoking multiple racial identities....Focusing on several key novels—Nella Larsen’s Quicksand (1928), Lucinda Roy’s Lady Moses (1998), and Danzy Senna’s Caucasia (1998)—as well as memoirs by Obama, James McBride, and Rebecca Walker and the personae of singer Mariah Carey and actress Halle Berry, Dagbovie-Mullins challenges conventional claims about biracial identification with a concept she calls “black-sentient mixed-race identity.” Whereas some multiracial organizations can diminish blackness by, for example, championing the inclusion of multiple-race options on census forms and similar documents, a black-sentient consciousness stresses a perception rooted in blackness—“a connection to a black consciousness,” writes the author, “that does not overdetermine but still plays a large role in one’s racial identification.” By examining the nuances of this concept through close readings of fiction, memoir, and the public images of mixed-race celebrities, Dagbovie-Mullins demonstrates how a “black-sentient mixed-race identity reconciles the widening separation between black/white mixed race and blackness that has been encouraged by contemporary mixed-race politics and popular culture.”...A book that promises to spark new debate and thoughtful reconsiderations of an especially timely topic, Crossing B(l)ack recognizes and investigates assertions of a black-centered mixed-race identity that does not divorce a premodern racial identity from a postmodern racial fluidity.

Desert rose : the life and legacy of Coretta Scott King / Edythe Scott Bagley with Joe Hilley ; afterword by Bernice A. King.  Tuscaloosa : University of Alabama Press, c2012.  318pp.  Main Library E185.97.K47 B34 2012 : Desert Rose details Coretta Scott King's upbringing in a family of proud, land-owning African Americans with a profound devotion to the ideals of social equality and the values of education, as well as her later role as her husband's most trusted confidant and advisor....Coretta Scott King—noted author, human rights activist, and wife and partner of famed Civil Rights Movement leader Martin Luther King Jr.—grew up in the rural Alabama Black Belt with her older sister, Edythe Scott Bagley. Bagley chronicles the sisters’ early education together at the Crossroads School and later at the progressive Lincoln School in Marion. She describes Coretta’s burgeoning talent for singing and her devotion to musical studies, and the sisters’ experiences matriculating at Antioch College, an all-white college far from the rural South. Bagley provides vivid insights into Coretta’s early passion for racial and economic justice, which lead to her involvement in the Peace Movement and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People....As Coretta’s older sister, Edythe shared in almost all of Coretta’s many trials and tribulations. Desert Rose charts Coretta’s hesitance about her romance with Martin Luther King and the prospect of having to sacrifice her dream of a career in music to become a minister’s wife.  Ultimately, Coretta chose to utilize her artistic gifts and singing voice for the Movement through the development and performance of Freedom Concerts. This book also charts Coretta’s own commitment and dedication, in the years that followed King’s death, to the causes of international civil rights, the antiapartheid movement, and the establishment of the King Center in Atlanta and the national King Holiday. Coretta’s devotion to activism, motherhood, and the movement led by her husband, and her courageous assumption of the legacy left in the wake of King’s untimely assassination, are wonderfully detailed in this intimate biography.

Detroit : race riots, racial conflicts, and efforts to bridge the racial divide / Joe T. Darden and Richard W. Thomas.  East Lansing : Michigan State University Press, c2013. 346pp.  F574.D49 N43345 2013 : During the summer of 1967, Detroit suffered the most severe racial conflict in its history and in the US. Darden (geography) and Thomas (emeritus, history, both Michigan State U.) ask what happened, where it happened, why it happened, the extent to which the conditions that caused the riots have changed since then, what efforts have occurred since the riots to reduce racial conflicts and build bridges across racial divides, and what alternative futures Detroit  residents face.

Devil in the grove: Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys, and the dawn of a new America / Gilbert King.  New York : Harper, c2012.  434pp.  Main Library HV9956.G76 K56 2012 : Chronicles a little-known court case in which Thurgood Marshall successfully saved a black citrus worker from the electric chair after the worker was accused of raping a while woman with three other black men.

Early African American print culture / edited by Lara Langer Cohen and Jordan Alexander Stein.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press : Library Company of Philadelphia, c2012.  422pp.  Main Library Z480.L58 E17 2012 : The eighteenth and nineteenth centuries saw both the consolidation of American print culture and the establishment of an African American literary tradition, yet the two are too rarely considered in tandem. In this landmark volume, a stellar group of established and emerging scholars ranges over periods, locations, and media to explore African Americans' diverse contributions to early American print culture, both on the page and off....The book's seventeen chapters consider domestic novels and gallows narratives, Francophone poetry and engravings of Liberia, transatlantic lyrics and San Francisco newspapers. Together, they consider how close attention to the archive can expand the study of African American literature well beyond matters of authorship to include issues of editing, illustration, circulation, and reading—and how this expansion can enrich and transform the study of print culture more generally....Published in cooperation with the Library Company of Philadelphia.

Encyclopedia of black radio in the United States, 1921-1955 / Ryan Ellett.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland, c2012.  208pp.  Main LibraryPN1991.8.A35 E45 2012 : In this encyclopedia, Ellett, who edits an online publication on old time radio, collects information on black programming during radio's Golden Age, from 1928 to 1962. Performers and shows are arranged alphabetically, with information on appearances, radio stations, and show dates, content, and history. Some white performers are included when the program had African American actors or writers or was based on themes and content of interest to the black press and its readers, and listeners. The radio work of some black musicians, such as Louis Armstrong, is also included. Detailed coverage of disc jockeys is excluded, although prominent pioneers are listed. An appendix provides episode guides for The Negro Achievement Hour and The Negro Art Group Hour.

Envisioning emancipation : Black Americans and the end of slavery / Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer.  Philadelphia [Pa.] : Temple University Press, 2013. 232pp.  E185.2 .W68 2013 : The Emancipation Proclamation is one of the most important documents in American history. As we commemorate its 150th anniversary, what do we really know about those who experienced slavery? ..In their pioneering book, Envisioning Emancipation, renowned photographic historian Deborah Willis and historian of slavery Barbara Krauthamer have amassed 150 photographs--some never before published--from the antebellum days of the 1850s through the New Deal era of the 1930s. The authors vividly display the seismic impact of emancipation on African Americans born before and after the Proclamation, providing a perspective on freedom and slavery and a way to understand the photos as documents of engagement, action, struggle, and aspiration....Envisioning Emancipation illustrates what freedom looked like for black Americans in the Civil War era. From photos of the enslaved on plantations and African American soldiers and camp workers in the Union Army to Juneteenth celebrations, slave reunions, and portraits of black families and workers in the American South, the images in this book challenge perceptions of slavery. They show not only what the subjects emphasized about themselves but also the ways Americans of all colors and genders opposed slavery and marked its end....Filled with powerful images of lives too often ignored or erased from historical records, Envisioning Emancipation provides a new perspective on American culture

Eugene Kinckle Jones : the National Urban League and Black social work, 1910-1940 / Felix L. Armfield.  Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012.  116pp.  Main LibraryHN64 .A76 2012 : Drawing on extensive interviews and newly available primary source documents, this biography of Eugene Kinkle Jones examines the wide ranging career of this social reformer of the early twentieth century, and explores his work with the Urban League, campaigning for the rights of African-Americans in the economic expansion of the era. The work discusses the development of professional social work in the African American community in the work of the League, and advances in workplace and labor rights in northern cities full of recent emigrants from the rural South.

Featured Books, F-L

Faithful to the task at hand : the life of Lucy Diggs Slowe / Carroll L.L. Miller and Anne S. Pruitt-Logan.  Albany : State University of New York Press, c2012.  448pp.  Main Library LA2317.S6185 M55 2012 : The story of Lucy Diggs Slowe, a pioneering African American figure in sports and education

The fire of freedom : Abraham Galloway & the slaves' Civil War / David S. Cecelski.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  326pp.  Main Library E540.N3 C37 2012 : Abraham H. Galloway (1837-70) was a fiery young slave rebel, radical abolitionist, and Union spy who rose out of bondage to become one of the most significant and stirring black leaders in the South during the Civil War. Throughout his brief, mercurial life, Galloway fought against slavery and injustice. He risked his life behind enemy lines, recruited black soldiers for the North, and fought racism in the Union army's ranks. He also stood at the forefront of an African American political movement that flourished in the Union-occupied parts of North Carolina, even leading a historic delegation of black southerners to the White House to meet with President Lincoln and to demand the full rights of citizenship. He later became one of the first black men elected to the North Carolina legislature....Long hidden from history, Galloway's story reveals a war unfamiliar to most of us. As David Cecelski writes, "Galloway's Civil War was a slave insurgency, a war of liberation that was the culmination of generations of perseverance and faith." This riveting portrait illuminates Galloway's life and deepens our insight into the Civil War and Reconstruction as experienced by African Americans in the South.

From Edward Brooke to Barack Obama : African American political success, 1966-2008 / Dennis S. Nordin.  Columbia, Mo. ; London : University of Missouri Press, c2012.  258pp.  Main Library E185.615 .N67 2012 : In 2008, American history was forever changed with the election of Barack Obama, the United States’ first African American president. However, Obama was far from the first African American to run for a public office or to face the complexities of race in a political campaign. For over a century, offices ranging from city mayor to state senator have been filled by African Americans, making race a factor in many elections. In From Edward Brooke to Barack Obama, Dennis S. Nordin navigates the history of biracial elections by examining the experiences of a variety of African American politicians from across the country, revealing how voters, both black and white, respond to the issue of race in an election....The idea to compare the African American political experience across several levels of office first occurred to Nordin as he was researching Arthur W. Mitchell’s 1934 congressional campaign. The question of white voter support was of particular significance, as was whether the continuation of that support depended upon his avoiding minority issues in office. To begin answering these questions and others, Nordin compares the experiences of eleven African American politicians. Taken from across the country to ensure a wide sample and accurate depiction of the subject, the case studies examined include Tom Bradley, mayor of Los Angeles; David Dinkins, mayor of New York; Freeman Bosley Jr., mayor of St. Louis; Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts; Senator Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois; Governor L. Douglas Wilder of Virginia; and Representative J. C. Watts Jr. of Oklahoma, among others. As Nordin analyzes these individuals and their contribution to the whole, he concludes that biracial elections in the United States have yet to progress beyond race....From Edward Brooke to Barack Obama investigates the implications of race in politics, a highly relevant topic in today’s American society. It offers readers a chronological overview of the progress made over the last several decades as well as shows where there is room for growth in the political arena. By taking a pertinent topic for the era and placing it in the context of history, Nordin successfully chronicles the roles of race and race relations in American politics.

Go-go live : the musical life and death of a chocolate city / Natalie Hopkinson.  Durham : Duke University Press, 2012.  214pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Book Collection ML3527.84 .H67 2012 : Go-go is the conga drum–inflected black popular music that emerged in Washington, D.C., during the 1970s. The guitarist Chuck Brown, the "Godfather of Go-Go," created the music by mixing sounds borrowed from church and the blues with the funk and flavor that he picked up playing for a local Latino band. Born in the inner city, amid the charred ruins of the 1968 race riots, go-go generated a distinct culture and an economy of independent, almost exclusively black-owned businesses that sold tickets to shows and recordings of live go-gos. At the peak of its popularity, in the 1980s, go-go could be heard around the capital every night of the week, on college campuses and in crumbling historic theaters, hole-in-the-wall nightclubs, backyards, and city parks....Go-Go Live is a social history of black Washington told through its go-go music and culture. Encompassing dance moves, nightclubs, and fashion, as well as the voices of artists, fans, business owners, and politicians, Natalie Hopkinson's Washington-based narrative reflects the broader history of race in urban America in the second half of the twentieth century and the early twenty-first. In the 1990s, the middle class that had left the city for the suburbs in the postwar years began to return. Gentrification drove up property values and pushed go-go into D.C.'s suburbs. The Chocolate City is in decline, but its heart, D.C.'s distinctive go-go musical culture, continues to beat. On any given night, there's live go-go in the D.C. metro area.

The Harlem Renaissance in the American West : the new Negro's western experience / edited by Bruce A. Glasrud and Cary D. Wintz.  New York : Routledge, 2012.  260pp.  Main Library E185.86 .H325 2012 : The Harlem Renaissance, an exciting period in the social and cultural history of the US, has over the past few decades re-established itself as a watershed moment in African American history. However, many of the African American communities outside the urban center of Harlem that participated in the Harlem Renaissance between 1914 and 1940, have been overlooked and neglected as locations of scholarship and research....

Harriet Tubman : freedom seeker, freedom leader / Rosemary Sadlier.  Toronto : Dundurn, c2012.  190pp.  E444.T82 S245 2012 : Born in the United States and enslaved as a child, Harriet Tubman (circa 18201913) is one of the best-known figures connected to the Underground Railroad. Through her knowledge and outdoor survival skills, honed through her unpaid labour in the fields and through the later connections she made in the abolitionist community, Tubman was well poised to command her followers. By her discipline and example, she never lost a "passenger."...Tubman's exploits helped to empower those opposed to slavery and enrage those who supported it. Her success encouraged enslaved Africans to make the brave break for freedom and reinforced the belief held by abolitionists in the potential of black freedom and independence. Referred to as "General Tubman" due to her contributions to the Underground Railroad and to the Union Army, Tubman's numerous rescue missions ending in Canada helped to build the interest in escape and reinforce the position of Canada as the final stop on the journey to freedom.

Help me to find my people : the African American search for family lost in slavery / Heather Andrea Williams.  Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  251pp.  Main Library E443 .W63 2012  : After the Civil War, African Americans placed poignant "information wanted" advertisements in newspapers, searching for missing family members. Inspired by the power of these ads, Heather Andrea Williams uses slave narratives, letters, interviews, public records, and diaries to guide readers back to devastating moments of family separation during slavery when people were sold away from parents, siblings, spouses, and children. Williams explores the heartbreaking stories of separation and the long, usually unsuccessful journeys toward reunification. Examining the interior lives of the enslaved and freedpeople as they tried to come to terms with great loss, Williams grounds their grief, fear, anger, longing, frustration, and hope in the history of American slavery and the domestic slave trade.
Williams follows those who were separated, chronicles their searches, and documents the rare experience of reunion. She also explores the sympathy, indifference, hostility, or empathy expressed by whites about sundered black families. Williams shows how searches for family members in the post-Civil War era continue to reverberate in African American culture in the ongoing search for family history and connection across generations.

In the crossfire : Marcus Foster and the troubled history of American school reform / John P. Spencer.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012.  304pp.  Main Library LA2317.F677 S64 2012  : As a teacher, principal, and superintendent-- first in his native Philadelphia and eventually in Oakland, California-- Foster made success stories of urban schools and children whom others had dismissed as hopeless, only to be assassinated in 1973 by thepreviously unknown Symbionese Liberation Army in a bizarre protest against an allegedly racist school system. Foster's story encapsulates larger social changes in the decades after World War II. By focusing on an educator who worked in the trenches and had a reputation for bridging divisions, Spencer sheds new light on the continuing ideological debates over race, poverty, and achievement.

Jim Crow laws / Leslie V. Tischauser.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2012.  215pp. Main Library KF4757 .T57 2012 : This volume on US race relations, part of the Landmarks of the American Mosaic series that highlights events and themes in the history of US multiculturalism, examines the rise and fall of Jim Crow segregation laws in the American South from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1960s. The work begins with a chronology of relevant events and provides detailed narrative chapters on the history of Jim Crow, biographical information on key figures, and a collection of important primary documents. An annotated bibliography of important related works is also provided.

Jim Crow Wisdom : Memory and Identity in Black America since 1940 / Jonathan Scott Holloway.  Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2013]  273pp.  Main Library  E185.625 .H64 2013 : How do we balance the desire for tales of exceptional accomplishment with the need for painful doses of reality? How hard do we work to remember our past or to forget it? These are some of the questions that Jonathan Scott Holloway addresses in this exploration of race memory from the dawn of the modern civil rights era to the present. Relying on social science, documentary film, dance, popular literature, museums, memoir, and the tourism trade, Holloway explores the stories black Americans have told about their past and why these stories are vital to understanding a modern black identity. In the process, Holloway asks much larger questions about the value of history and facts when memories do violence to both....Making discoveries about his own past while researching this book, Holloway weaves first-person and family memories into the traditional third-person historian's perspective. The result is a highly readable, rich, and deeply personal narrative that will be familiar to some, shocking to others, and thought-provoking to everyone.

The King years : historic moments in the civil rights movement / Taylor Branch.  New York : Simon & Schuster, 2013.  210pp.  Main Library E185.61 .B7913 2013 : The King Years delivers riveting tales of everyday heroes who achieved miracles in constructive purpose and yet poignantly fell short. Here is the full sweep of an era that still reverberates in national politics. Its legacy remains unsettled; there are further lessons to be discovered before free citizens can once again move officials to address the most intractable, fearful dilemmas. This vital primer amply fulfills its author’s dedication: “For students of freedom and teachers of history.”  ... This compact volume brings to life eighteen pivotal dramas, beginning with the impromptu speech that turned an untested, twenty-six-year-old Martin Luther King forever into a public figure on the first night of the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. Five years later, minority students filled the jails in a 1960 sit-in movement, and, in 1961, the Freedom Riders seized national attention. ... Branch interprets King’s famous speech at the 1963 March on Washington, then relives the Birmingham church bombing that challenged his dream of equal souls and equal votes. We see student leader Bob Moses mobilize college volunteers for Mississippi’s 1964 Freedom Summer, and a decade-long movement at last secures the first of several landmark laws for equal rights. At the same time, the presidential nominating conventions were drawn into sharp and unprecedented party realignment.  ... In “King, J. Edgar Hoover, and the Nobel Peace Prize,” Branch details the covert use of state power for a personal vendetta. “Crossroads in Selma” describes King’s ordeal to steer the battered citizen’s movement through hopes and threats from every level of government. “Crossroads in Vietnam” glimpses the ominous wartime split between King and President Lyndon Johnson. As backlash shadowed a Chicago campaign to expose northern prejudice, and the Black Power slogan of Stokely Carmichael captivated a world grown weary of nonviolent protest, King grew ever more isolated. As Branch writes, King “pushed downward into lonelier causes until he wound up among the sanitation workers of Memphis.” A requiem chapter leads to his fateful assassination.

The land was ours : African American beaches from Jim Crow to the Sunbelt South / Andrew W. Kahrl.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2012.  346pp.  Main Library E185.8 .K215 2012 : Driving along the coasts of the American South, we see miles of luxury condominiums, timeshare resorts, and gated communities. Yet, a century ago, a surprising amount of beachfront property in the Chesapeake, along the Carolina shore, and around the Gulf of Mexico was owned and populated by African Americans. In a pathbreaking combination of social and environmental history, Andrew W. Kahrl shows how the rise and fall of Jim Crow and the growing prosperity of the Sunbelt have transformed both communities and ecosystems along the southern seaboard....Kahrl traces the history of these dynamic coastlines in all their incarnations, from unimproved marshlands to segregated beaches, from exclusive resorts for the black elite to campgrounds for religious revival. His careful reconstruction of African American life, labor, and leisure in small oceanside communities reveals the variety of ways African Americans pursued freedom and mobility through the land under their feet....The Land Was Ours makes unexpected connections between two seemingly diverse topics: African Americans’ struggles for economic empowerment and the ecology of coastal lands. Kahrl’s innovative approach allows him fresh insights into the rise of African American consumers and the widespread campaigns to dispossess blacks of their property. His skillful portrayal of African American landowners and real-estate developers rescues the stories of these architects of the southern landscape from historical neglect. Ultimately, Kahrl offers readers a thoughtful, judicious appraisal of the ambiguous legacy of racial progress in the Sunbelt.

The Long Walk to Freedom: Runaway Slave Narratives / edited, and with introductions, by Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise.  Boston, Mass. : Beacon Press, c2012.  248pp.  Main Library E450 .L83 2012 : In this groundbreaking compilation of first-person accounts of the runaway slave phenomenon, editors Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise have recovered twelve narratives spanning eight decades—more than half of which have been long out of print. Told in the voices of the runaway slaves themselves, these narratives reveal the extraordinary and often innovative ways that these men and women sought freedom and demanded citizenship. Also included is an essay by UCLA history professor Brenda Stevenson that contextualizes these narratives, providing a brief yet comprehensive history of slavery, as well as a look into the daily life of a slave. Divided into four categories—running away for family, running inspired by religion, running by any means necessary, and running to be free—these stories are a testament to the indelible spirit of these remarkable survivors....The Long Walk to Freedom presents excerpts from the narratives of well-known runaway slaves, like Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, as well as from the narratives of lesser-known and virtually unknown people. Several of these excerpts have not been published for more than a hundred years. But they all portray the courageous and sometimes shocking ways that these men and women sought their freedom and asserted power, often challenging many of the common assumptions about slaves’ lack of agency....Among the remarkable and inspiring stories is the tense but triumphant tale of Henry Box Brown, who, with a white abolitionist’s help, shipped himself in a box—over a twenty-seven-hour train ride, part of which he spent standing on his head—to freedom in Philadelphia. And there’s the story of William and Ellen Craft, who fled across thousands of miles, with Ellen, who was light-skinned, disguised as a white male slave-owner so she and her husband could achieve their dream of raising their children as free people...

Looking for Leroy : illegible black masculinities / Mark Anthony NealNew York : New York University Press, [2013].  207pp.  Main Library E185.86 .N394 2013 : Mark Anthony Neal’s Looking for Leroy is an engaging and provocative analysis of the complex ways in which black masculinity has been read and misread through contemporary American popular culture. Neal argues that black men and boys are bound, in profound ways, to and by their legibility. The most “legible” black male bodies are often rendered as criminal, bodies in need of policing and containment. Ironically, Neal argues, this sort of legibility brings welcome relief to white America, providing easily identifiable images of black men in an era defined by shifts in racial, sexual, and gendered identities....Neal highlights the radical potential of rendering legible black male bodies—those bodies that are all too real for us—as illegible, while simultaneously rendering illegible black male bodies—those versions of black masculinity that we can’t believe are real—as legible. In examining figures such as hip-hop entrepreneur and artist Jay-Z, R&B Svengali R. Kelly, the late vocalist Luther Vandross, and characters from the hit HBO series The Wire, among others, Neal demonstrates how distinct representations of black masculinity can break the links in the public imagination that create antagonism toward black men. Looking for Leroy features close readings of contemporary black masculinity and popular culture, highlighting both the complexity and accessibility of black men and boys through visual and sonic cues within American culture, media, and public policy. By rendering legible the illegible, Neal maps the range of identifications and anxieties that have marked the performance and reception of post-Civil Rights era African American masculinity.

Featured Books, M-Z

The making of Black Detroit in the age of Henry Ford / Beth Tompkins Bates. Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2012.  343pp.  F574.D49 N428 2012 : In the 1920s, Henry Ford hired thousands of African American men for his open-shop system of auto manufacturing. This move was a rejection of the notion that better jobs were for white men only. In The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford, Beth Tompkins Bates explains how black Detroiters, newly arrived from the South, seized the economic opportunities offered by Ford in the hope of gaining greater economic security. As these workers came to realize that Ford's anti-union "American Plan" did not allow them full access to the American Dream, their loyalty eroded, and they sought empowerment by pursuing a broad activist agenda. This, in turn, led them to play a pivotal role in the United Auto Workers' challenge to Ford's interests....In order to fully understand this complex shift, Bates traces allegiances among Detroit's African American community as reflected in its opposition to the Ku Klux Klan, challenges to unfair housing practices, and demands for increased and effective political participation. This groundbreaking history demonstrates how by World War II Henry Ford and his company had helped kindle the civil rights movement in Detroit without intending to do so.

Mojo workin' : the old African American Hoodoo system / Katrina Hazzard-Donald.  Urbana, IL : University of Illinois Press, c2013.  234pp.  on order : In this book, Katrina Hazzard-Donald explores African Americans' experience and practice of the herbal, healing folk belief tradition known as Hoodoo. Working against conventional scholarship, Hazzard-Donald argues that Hoodoo emerged first in three distinct regions she calls "regional Hoodoo clusters" and that after the turn of the nineteenth century, Hoodoo took on a national rather than regional profile. The first interdisciplinary examination to incorporate a full glossary of Hoodoo culture, Mojo Workin': The Old African American Hoodoo System lays out the movement of Hoodoo against a series of watershed changes in the American cultural landscape. Throughout, Hazzard-Donald distinguishes between "Old tradition Black Belt Hoodoo" and commercially marketed forms that have been controlled, modified, and often fabricated by outsiders; this study focuses on the hidden system operating almost exclusively among African Americans in the Black spiritual underground.

Nation of cowards : black activism in Barack Obama's post-racial America / David Ikard and Martell Lee Teasley.  Bloomington : Indiana University Press, 2012.  160pp.  Main Library E185.86 .I39 2012 : In a speech from which Nation of Cowards derives its title, Attorney General Eric Holder argued forcefully that Americans today need to talk more—not less—about racism. This appeal for candid talk about race exposes the paradox of Barack Obama’s historic rise to the US presidency and the ever-increasing social and economic instability of African American communities. David H. Ikard and Martell Lee Teasley maintain that such a conversation can take place only with passionate and organized pressure from black Americans, and that neither Obama nor any political figure is likely to be in the forefront of addressing issues of racial inequality and injustice. The authors caution blacks not to slip into an accommodating and self-defeating "post-racial" political posture, settling for the symbolic capital of a black president instead of demanding structural change. They urge the black community to challenge the social terms on which it copes with oppression, including acts of self-imposed victimization.

Negro Leagues baseball / Roger A. Bruns.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2012.  196pp.  on order : Part of Greenwood's Landmarks of the American Mosaic series, this work is a one-stop introduction to the subject of Negro League baseball that spotlights the achievements and experiences of black ball players during the time of segregation—ones that must not be allowed to fade into obscurity. Telling far more than a story about sports that includes engaging tales of star athletes like "Satchel" Paige and "Cool Papa" Bell, Negro Leagues Baseball documents an essential chapter of American history rooted in the fight for civil rights and human dignity and the battle against racism and bigotry....The book comprises an introduction, chronology, and narrative chapters, as well as biographical profiles, primary documents, a glossary, a bibliography, and an index. The recounting of individual stories and historical events will fascinate general readers, while rarely used documentary material places the subject of Negro League baseball in relation to civil rights issues, making the book invaluable to students of American social history and culture.

The one : the life and music of James Brown / R.J. Smith.  New York : Gotham Books, c2012.  455pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML420.B818 S65 2012 : Playing 350 shows a year at his peak, with more than forty Billboard hits, James Brown was a dazzling showman who transformed American music. His life offstage was just as vibrant, and until now no biographer has delivered a complete profile. The One draws on interviews with more than 100 people who knew Brown personally or played with him professionally. Using these sources, award-winning writer RJ Smith draws a portrait of a man whose twisted and amazing life helps us to understand the music he made....The One delves deeply into the story of a man who was raised in abject-almost medieval-poverty in the segregated South but grew up to earn (and lose) several fortunes. Covering everything from Brown's unconventional childhood (his aunt ran a bordello), to his role in the Black Power movement, which used "Say It Loud (I'm Black and Proud)" as its anthem, to his high-profile friendships, to his complicated family life, Smith's meticulous research and sparkling prose blend biography with a cultural history of a pivotal era....At the heart of The One is Brown's musical genius. He had crucial influence as an artist during at least three decades; he inspires pity, awe, and revulsion. As Smith traces the legend's reinvention of funk, soul, R&B, and pop, he gives this history a melody all its own.

Opposing Jim Crow : African Americans and the Soviet indictment of U.S. racism, 1928 - 1937 / Meredith L Roman.  Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, 2012.  301pp.  Main Library DK268.4 .R66 2012  : Before the Nazis came to power in Germany, Soviet officials labeled the United States the most racist country in the world. Photographs, children’s stories, films, newspaper articles, political education campaigns, and court proceedings exposed the hypocrisy of America’s racial democracy. In contrast, the Soviets represented the USSR itself as a superior society where racism was absent and identified African Americans as valued allies in resisting an imminent imperialist war against the first workers’ state....Meredith L. Roman’s Opposing Jim Crow examines the period between 1928 and 1937, when the promotion of antiracism by party and trade union officials in Moscow became a priority policy. Although Soviet leaders stood to gain considerable propagandistic value at home and abroad by drawing attention to U.S. racism, their actions simultaneously directed attention to the routine violation of human rights that African Americans suffered as citizens of the United States. Soviet policy also challenged the prevailing white supremacist notion that blacks were biologically inferior and thus unworthy of equality with whites. African Americans of various political and socioeconomic backgrounds became indispensable contributors to Soviet antiracism and helped officials in Moscow challenge the United States’ claim to be the world’s beacon of democracy and freedom.

The Oxford handbook of African American citizenship, 1865-present / edited by Henry Louis Gates, Jr., Claude Steele, Lawrence D. Bobo, Michael C. Dawson, Gerald Jaynes, Lisa Crooms-Robinson, Linda Darling-Hammond.  New York : Oxford University Press, ©2012.  848pp.  Main Library E185.6 .O85 2012 : When newly-liberated African American slaves attempted to enter the marketplace and exercise their rights as citizens of the United States in 1865, few, if any, Americans expected that, a century and a half later, the class divide between black and white Americans would be as wide as it is today. The United States has faced several potential key turning points in the status of African Americans over the course of its history, yet at each of these points the prevailing understanding of African Americans and their place in the economic and political fabric of the country was at best contested and resolved on the side of second-class citizenship....The Oxford Handbook of African American Citizenship, 1865-Present seeks to answer the question of what the United States would look like today if, at the end of the Civil War, freed slaves had been granted full political, social and economic rights. It does so by tracing the historical evolution of African American experiences, from the dawn of Reconstruction onward, through the perspectives of sociology, political science, law, economics, education and psychology. As a whole, the book is the first systematic study of the gap between promise and performance of African Americans since 1865. Over the course of thirty-four chapters, written by some of the most eminent scholars of African American studies and across every major social discipline, this handbook presents a full and powerful portrait of the particular hurdles faced by African Americans and the distinctive contributions African Americans have made to the development of U.S. institutions and culture. As such, it tracks where African Americans have been in order to better illuminate the path ahead.

Plessy v. Ferguson / Thomas J. Davis.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, c2012.  238pp.  Business Library  KF223.P56 D38 2012 : For high school students, undergraduates, and general readers, Davis, a historian and lawyer who teaches US constitutional and legal history at Arizona State U., Tempe, explores the origins, contents, and contexts of the Plessy v. Ferguson case and its contemporary and historical background. He provides a chronology of the cultural and political events significant to understanding the people and positions involved in the case's development, then details the events leading to Homer Plessy's arrest and trial on charges of violating Louisiana's segregationist 1890 Separate Car Act by sitting in a train car for whites only. He examines Louisiana's racial makeup and the increased racial divide slavery imposed, the controversy over racial discrimination over many decades, the struggle surrounding what Louisiana law should be and who should make it, developing constitutional issues of the authority of the state, and legal developments that produced the Separate Car Act and the Plessy v. Ferguson case. Included are six brief biographies of key figures, primary documents, and an annotated bibliography.  Part of the Landmarks of the American Mosaic series.

Plessy v. Ferguson : race and inequality in Jim Crow America / Williamjames Hull Hoffer.  Lawrence, Kan. : University Press of Kansas, c2012.  219pp.  MSU Schaeffer Law Library, 1st Level KF223.P56 H64 2012 : Six decades before Rosa Parks boarded her fateful bus, another traveler in the Deep South tried to strike a blow against racial discrimination—but ultimately fell short of that goal, leading to the Supreme Court’s landmark 1896 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson. Now Williamjames Hull Hoffer vividly details the origins, litigation, opinions, and aftermath of this notorious case....In response to the passage of the Louisiana Separate Car Act of 1890, which prescribed “equal but separate accommodations” on public transportation, a group called the Committee of Citizens decided to challenge its constitutionality. At a pre-selected time and place, Homer Plessy, on behalf of the committee, boarded a train car set aside for whites, announced his non-white racial identity, and was immediately arrested. The legal deliberations that followed eventually led to the Court’s 7-1 decision in Plessy, which upheld both the Louisiana statute and the state’s police powers. It also helped create a Jim Crow system that would last deep into the twentieth century, until Brown v. Board of Education in 1954 and other cases helped overturn it....Hoffer’s readable study synthesizes past work on this landmark case, while also shedding new light on its proceedings and often-neglected historical contexts. From the streets of New Orleans’ Faubourg Tremé district to the justices’ chambers at the Supreme Court, he breathes new life into the opposing forces, dissecting their arguments to clarify one of the most important, controversial, and socially revealing cases in American law. He particularly focuses on Justice Henry Billings Brown’s ruling that the statute’s “equal, but separate” condition was a sufficient constitutional standard for equality, and on Justice John Marshall Harlan’s classic dissent, in which he stated, “Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among its citizens.”...Hoffer’s compelling reconstruction illuminates the controversies and impact of Plessy v. Ferguson for a new generation of students and other interested readers. It also pays tribute to a group of little known heroes from the Deep South who failed to hold back the tide of racial segregation but nevertheless laid the groundwork for a less divided America.

The political thought of Frederick Douglass : in pursuit of American liberty / Nicholas Buccola.  New York ; London : New York University Press, c2012.  215pp.  Main Library E449.D75 B83 2012 : Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history, was born a slave, but escaped to the North and became a well-known anti-slavery activist, orator, and author. In The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass, Nicholas Buccola provides an important and original argument about the ideas that animated this reformer-statesman. Beyond his role as an abolitionist, Buccola argues for the importance of understanding Douglass as a political thinker who provides deep insights into the immense challenge of achieving and maintaining the liberal promise of freedom. Douglass, Buccola contends, shows us that the language of rights must be coupled with a robust understanding of social responsibility in order for liberal ideals to be realized. Truly an original American thinker, this book highlights Douglass’s rightful place among the great thinkers in the American liberal tradition.

Presidents and Black America : a documentary history / [edited by] Stephen A. Jones, Eric Freedman.  Thousand Oaks, Calif. : SAGE/CQ Press, c2012.  546pp.  E176.472.A34 P74 2012  :  Jones (history, Central Michigan U.) and Freedman (journalism, Michigan State U.) document the wide range of relationships of all the US presidents with African Americans and their views on issues such as slavery, segregation, racial violence, voting rights, and other civil liberties, and the growth of black political power and influence. The presidents' perspectives are illustrated through letters, speeches, executive orders, presidential proclamations, diary entries, articles, editorials, political cartoons, and congressional testimony and debates. Discussion of primary documents such as Washington's letter to poet Phillis Wheatley, John Quincy Adams's Supreme Court argument in the Amistad slave case, a petition from African Americans to Lincoln promoting black colonization in the rebel states, Truman's executive order that desegregated the armed forces, Reagan's remarks signing the bill making Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday a national holiday, and Obama's Independence Hall speech on race are included.

Presumed incompetent : the intersections of race and class for women in academia / edited by Gabriella Gutiérrez y Muhs ... [et al.].  Boulder, Colo. : University Press of Colorado, c2012.  570pp.  Main Library LB2332.3 .P74 2012 : Presumed Incompetent is a pathbreaking account of the intersecting roles of race, gender, and class in the working lives of women faculty of color. Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, more than 40 authors expose the daunting challenges faced by academic women of color as they navigate the often hostile terrain of higher education, including hiring, promotion, tenure, and relations with students, colleagues, and administrators. The narratives are filled with wit, wisdom, and concrete recommendations, and provide a window into the struggles of professional women in a racially stratified but increasingly multicultural America

Prove it on me : new Negroes, sex, and popular culture in the 1920s / Erin D. Chapman.  New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  189pp.  Main Library E185.86 .C433 2012 : In the wake of the Great Migration of thousands of African Americans from the scattered hamlets and farms of the rural South to the nation's burgeoning cities, a New Negro ethos of modernist cultural expression and potent self-determination arose to challenge white supremacy and create opportunities for racial advancement. In Prove It On Me, Erin D. Chapman explores the gender and sexual politics of this modern racial ethos and reveals the constraining and exploitative underside of the New Negro era's vaunted liberation and opportunities. Chapman's cultural history documents the effects on black women of the intersection of primitivism, New Negro patriarchal aspirations, and the early twentieth-century consumer culture. As U.S. society invested in the New Negroes, turning their expressions and race politics into entertaining commodities in a sexualized, primitivist popular culture, the New Negroes invested in the idea of black womanhood as a pillar of stability against the unsettling forces of myriad social and racial transformations. And both groups used black women's bodies and identities to "prove" their own modern notions and new identities. Chapman's analysis brings together advertisements selling the blueswoman to black and white consumers in a "sex-race marketplace," the didactic preachments of New Negro reformers advocating a conservative gender politics of "race motherhood," and the words of the New Negro women authors and migrants who boldly or implicitly challenged these dehumanizing discourses. Prove It On Me investigates the uses made of black women's bodies in 1920s popular culture and racial politics and black women's opportunities to assert their own modern, racial identities.

Psychology comes to Harlem : rethinking the race question in twentieth-century America / Jay Garcia.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.  216pp.  Main Library E185.625 .L56 2012 : In the years preceding the modern civil rights era, cultural critics profoundly affected American letters through psychologically informed explorations of racial ideology and segregationist practice. Jay Garcia’s probing look at how and why these critiques arose and the changes they wrought demonstrates the central role Richard Wright and his contemporaries played in devising modern antiracist cultural analysis....Departing from the largely accepted existence of a "Negro Problem," Wright and such literary luminaries as Ralph Ellison, Lillian Smith, and James Baldwin described and challenged a racist social order whose psychological undercurrents implicated all Americans and had yet to be adequately studied. Motivated by the elastic possibilities of clinical and academic inquiry, writers and critics undertook a rethinking of "race" and assessed the value of psychotherapy and psychological theory as antiracist strategies. Garcia examines how this new criticism brought together black and white writers and became a common idiom through fiction and nonfiction that attracted wide readerships....An illuminating picture of mid-twentieth-century American literary culture and learned life, Psychology Comes to Harlem reveals the critical and intellectual innovation of literary artists who bridged psychology and antiracism to challenge segregation.

Race and justice : wrongful convictions of African American men / Marvin D. Free, Jr., Mitch Ruesink.  Boulder, Colo. : Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2012.  334pp.  Main Library HV9950 .F744 2012 : This comprehensive volume on the wrongful conviction of African American men in the American judicial system provides a detailed collection of statistical data and analysis on specific aspects of these miscarriages of justice that are increasingly being brought to light by advanced DNA testing and other modern review processes. The volume covers the data surrounding wrongful conviction generally, profiles prominent cases, and breaks down statistical information by crime, covering murder and attempted murder, sex crimes, drug offenses, and robbery and other crimes. An appendix provides an encyclopedic listing of wrongful conviction cases.

Race, gender, and identity : a social science comparative analysis of Africana culture / James L. Conyers, Jr., editor.  New Brunswick : Transaction Publishers, 2013.  116pp.  E185.86 .R236 2013 : Social scientists explore the three factors within the African-American community. Their topics include African American healing women in the films of Julie Dash and Kasi Lemmons, African American males' maladaptive coping strategies to racism at predominately white post-secondary institutions, the layering of multiple identities in Dayton funk music, Steele and the Supreme Court's creation of the union's duty of fair representation, and the hip hop nation and alternative intentional communities for social justice.

Race, social science and the crisis of manhood, 1890-1970: we are the supermen / by Malinda Alaine Lindquist.  New York : Routledge, 2012.  244pp.  Main Library E185.625 .L56 2012 : Describes the young black male crisis, why we are largely unfamiliar with the story of the black superman, and why this matters to contemporary debates. It does so by returning to the work of those original black social scientists to explore the ways in which they understood the challenges of black manhood, offered substantive critiques of the nation’s race, class, and gender systems, and worked to construct a progression. The careful study of their work reveals the centrality of gender to discussions of race and class, and also new possibilities for understanding and discussing black men. This book offers a look at pioneering black social scientists as well as a history of the changing perceptions, ideals, and shifting depictions of black and white manhood over nearly a century.

Rap and Religion: Understanding The Gangsta’s God / Ebony A. Utley. Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2012. 190pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML3921.8.R63 U75 2012 : Utley (communication studies, California State U.) explores the thematic meanings of invocations of God in rap music, structuring her argument around the consistent contrasting themes between God "out there," at a remove from humanity and the life of the rapper, and God "down here," walking amongst and identifiable with humanity. Six chapters explore public acknowledgement of God "out there" as a means for creating a community for God "down here;" the way women rappers construct God "out there" as a father figure and their lovers as God "down here;" the identification of Jesus as companion, crucified martyr, and commodity; the adversarial role of the devil "out there" and the trickster/badman characteristics of rappers who pose as the devil "down here;" the appropriation of both thematic notions of God in order to resist oppression, establish hierarchies, and regulate intimate relationships; and the personal religious beliefs of hip hop fans and their interpretations of rappers' discursive constructions of Jesus, God, and the devil.

Reading African American experiences in the Obama era : theory, advocacy, activism / edited by Ebony Elizabeth Thomas & Shanesha R.F. Brooks-Tatum.  276pp.  Main Library E185.86 .R368 2012 : What does it mean to be Black in the Obama era? In Reading African American Experiences in the Obama Era, young African American scholars and researchers and experienced community activists demonstrate how to encourage dialogue across curricula, disciplines, and communities with emphases on education, new media, and popular culture. Considering what this historic moment means for Black life, letters, and learning, this accessible yet scholarly volume encourages movement toward thoughtful analysis today.

Redefining Black power : reflections on the state of Black America / edited by Joanne Griffith.  San Francisco : City Lights Books, c2012.  207pp.  Main Library E185.86 .R378 2012 : In this book, Pacifica radio-journalist Joanne Griffith travels the country to interview leading black intellectuals, educators, authors and organizers about the state of Black America. The book is arranged as a series of separate interviews. She talks with Vincent Harding about the deepening of democracy in America, with Julianne Malveaux about race and economic inequality, with Michelle Alexander about law in the age of Obama, with Ramona Africa about revolutionary struggle, with Linn Washington Jr. about the media's inability to earnestly analyze government, with Van Jones about green activism; and with Esther Armah about the emotional impact of the first Black First Family.

Rumor, repression, and racial politics : how the harassment of Black elected officials shaped post-civil rights America / George Derek Musgrove.  Athens : University of Georgia Press, 2012.  296pp.  Main Library E185.615 .M84 2012 : Historians have exhaustively documented how African Americans gained access to electoral politics in the mid-1960s, but few have scrutinized what happened next, and the small body of work that does consider the aftermath of the civil rights movement is almost entirely limited to the Black Power era. In Rumor, Repression, and Racial Politics, George Derek Musgrove pushes much further, examining black elected officials’ allegations of state and news media repression—what they called “harassment”—to gain new insight into the role of race in U.S. politics between 1965 and 1995....Drawing from untapped sources, including interviews he conducted with twenty-five sitting and former black members of Congress, Musgrove tells new stories and reinterprets familiar events. His cast of characters includes Julian Bond, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Alcee Hastings, Ronald Dellums, Richard Arrington, and Marion Barry, as well as white political figures like Newt Gingrich and Jefferson Sessions. Throughout, Musgrove con­nects patterns of surveillance, counterintelligence, and disproportionate investigation of black elected officials to the broader political culture. In so doing, he reveals new aspects of the surveillance state of the late 1960s, the rise of adversary journalism and good government reforms in the wake of Watergate, the official corruption crackdown of the 1980s, and the allure of conspiracy theory to African Americans seeking to understand the harass­ment of their elected leadership....Moving past the old debate about whether there was a conscious conspiracy against black officials, Musgrove explores how the perception of harassment shaped black political thought in the post–civil rights era. The result is a field-defining work by a major new intellectual voice.

Samurai among panthers : Richard Aoki on race, resistance, and a paradoxical life / Diane C. Fujino.  Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2012.  441pp.  Main Library F870.J3 F87 2012  : An iconic figure of the Asian American movement, Richard Aoki (1938–2009) was also, as the most prominent non-Black member of the Black Panther Party, a key architect of Afro-Asian solidarity in the 1960s and ’70s. His life story exposes the personal side of political activism as it illuminates the history of ethnic nationalism and radical internationalism in America....A reflection of this interconnection, Samurai among Panthers weaves together two narratives: Aoki’s dramatic first-person chronicle and an interpretive history by a leading scholar of the Asian American movement, Diane C. Fujino. Aoki’s candid account of himself takes us from his early years in Japanese American internment camps to his political education on the streets of Oakland, to his emergence in the Black Panther Party. As his story unfolds, we see how his parents’ separation inside the camps and his father’s illegal activities shaped the development of Aoki’s politics. Fujino situates his life within the context of twentieth-century history—World War II, the Cold War, and the protests of the 1960s. She demonstrates how activism is both an accidental and an intentional endeavor and how a militant activist practice can also promote participatory democracy and social service....The result of these parallel voices and analysis in Samurai among Panthers is a complex—and sometimes contradictory—portrait of a singularly extraordinary activist and an expansion and deepening of our understanding of the history he lived.

Sick from freedom : African-American illness and suffering during the Civil War and reconstruction / Jim Downs.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  264pp.  Main Library RA448.5.N4 D69 2012 : Bondspeople who fled from slavery during and after the Civil War did not expect that their flight toward freedom would lead to sickness, disease, suffering, and death. But the war produced the largest biological crisis of the nineteenth century, and as historian Jim Downs reveals in this groundbreaking volume, it had deadly consequences for hundreds of thousands of freed people....In Sick from Freedom, Downs recovers the untold story of one of the bitterest ironies in American history--that the emancipation of the slaves, seen as one of the great turning points in U.S. history, had devastating consequences for innumerable freedpeople. Drawing on massive new research into the records of the Medical Division of the Freedmen's Bureau-a nascent national health system that cared for more than one million freed slaves-he shows how the collapse of the plantation economy released a plague of lethal diseases. With emancipation, African Americans seized the chance to move, migrating as never before. But in their journey to freedom, they also encountered yellow fever, smallpox, cholera, dysentery, malnutrition, and exposure. To address this crisis, the Medical Division hired more than 120 physicians, establishing some forty underfinanced and understaffed hospitals scattered throughout the South, largely in response to medical emergencies. Downs shows that the goal of the Medical Division was to promote a healthy workforce, an aim which often excluded a wide range of freedpeople, including women, the elderly, the physically disabled, and children. Downs concludes by tracing how the Reconstruction policy was then implemented in the American West, where it was disastrously applied to Native Americans....The widespread medical calamity sparked by emancipation is an overlooked episode of the Civil War and its aftermath, poignantly revealed in Sick from Freedom.

Sissieretta Jones : "the greatest singer of her race," 1868-1933 / Maureen D. Lee.  Columbia, South Carolina : University of South Carolina Press, 2012.  295pp.  Fine Arts Library, Music Collection ML420.B6325 L44 2012 : Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones, whose nickname the "Black Patti" likened her to the well-known Spanish-born opera star Adelina Patti, was a distinguished African American soprano during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Performing in such venues as Carnegie Hall and Madison Square Garden, Jones also sang before four U.S. presidents. In this compelling book-length biography of Jones, Maureen Donnelly Lee chronicles the successes and challenges of this musical pioneer. Lee details how Jones was able to overcome substantial obstacles of racial bias to build a twenty-eight-year career performing in hundreds of opera houses and theaters throughout North America and Europe....Serving as a role model for other African American women who came after her, Jones became a successful performer despite the many challenges she faced. She confronted head on the social difficulties African American performers endured during the rise of Jim Crow segregation. Throughout her career Jones was a concert singer performing ballads and operatic pieces, and she eventually went on to star in her own musical comedy company, the Black Patti Troubadours. Critics praised Jones as America's leading African American prima donna, with some even dubbing her voice one in a million....Lee's research, utilizing many black newspapers, such as the New York Age and the Indianapolis Freeman, concert reviews, and court documents brings overdue recognition to an important historical songstress. Sissieretta Jones: "The Greatest Singer of Her Race," 1868-1933 provides a comprehensive, moving portrait of Jones and a vivid overview of the exciting world in which she performed.

Tuskegee airmen / Barry M. Stentiford.  223pp. Main Library D790.252 332nd .S74 2012 : Stentiford (military history, US Army School of Advanced Military Studies) narrates the decision by President Roosevelt to create an all-black flying unit during World War II and the combat missions carried out by the 99th Fighter Squadron and the 332nd Fighter Group over Germany and Italy. Short biographies and b&w photographs of pilots are provided. An appendix reprints relevant US Army documents.  Part of the Landmarkes of the American Mosaic series.

Twice as good : the story of William Powell and Clearview, the only golf course designed, built, and owned by an African American / by Richard Michelson ; iIllustrated by Eric Velasquez.  Ann Arbor, MI : Sleeping Bear Press, c2012.  Turfgrass (3 West) GV964.P69 M53 2012 : Recounts the life of William Powell, an African American golfer discriminated against because of his race, and how his perseverance and spirit helped him rise from a caddy to the first African American owner of a public golf course.

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