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Michigan State University

Asian American Studies Research Guide: Web Sites

Contents

A compilation of web resources related to Asian Americans.

Asian Indian Americans

Ancestors in the Americas. A PBS series exploring the history and legacy of Asians in the Americas by Loni Ding.  Center for Educational Telecommunications.

Asian Indian AmericansA review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Chinese Americans

19th Century Chinese Immigration.   Professor Krystyn Moon talked about anti-immigration laws in the 19th century, focusing on Chinese immigrants. She described how an influx of Chinese immigrants on the West Coast during the 1800s led to both local and federal legislation attempting to limit or ban immigrants from China. The 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act was the first federal law to target a particular population based on nation of origin.  C-Span, February 22, 2017.

Ancestors in the Americas. A PBS series exploring the history and legacy of Asians in the Americas by Loni Ding.  Center for Educational Telecommunications.

Chinese American Contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad. Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.

Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles : The Chinese American Museum (CAM) is the first such museum in Southern California dedicated to the Chinese American experience and history in this region.

Chinese Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Chinese AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Chinese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Chinese Astrology : As the legend goes, more than five hundred years ago, the great Buddha invited all of the animals of creation to come and join him for the New Year. Only twelve species came at his invitation and to reward them, the divine wise man offered to name a year after each animal. From then on any person born in a year associated with that animal would share that animal's qualities. Those Animals were: the RAT, the OX, the TIGER, the RABBIT, the DRAGON, the SNAKE, the HORSE, the GOAT, the MONKEY, the ROOSTER, the DOG and the PIG. This was symboloised by the ordering in which they came, the Rat was first, followed by the Ox, and so on. Other traditions replace the Ox with the Buffalo, the Rabbit with the Cat or the Hare, the Goat with the Sheep or the Ram and the Pig with the Boar.

Chinese Historical Society of America : The Chinese Historical Society of America, conceived in San Francisco in the fall of 1962, was incorporated as a not-for-profit organization on January 5, 1963. The Society is the first such Chinese American historical society in North America. Its first major publication, A History of the Chinese in California: A Syllabus has become a classic resource book used by students, historians, educators, and scholars in their research and writing about the Chinese in America. To accommodate our expanding programs and exhibitions, CHSA opened the Chinese Historical Society of America Museum and Learning Center in the historic Julia Morgan Chinese YWCA building in November 2001.  Check out the web links.

Chinese Immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Acts.  In the 1850s, Chinese workers migrated to the United States, first to work in the gold mines, but also to take agricultural jobs, and factory work, especially in the garment industry. Chinese immigrants were particularly instrumental in building railroads in the American west, and as Chinese laborers grew successful in the United States, a number of them became entrepreneurs in their own right. As the numbers of Chinese laborers increased, so did the strength of anti-Chinese sentiment among other workers in the American economy. This finally resulted in legislation that aimed to limit future immigration of Chinese workers to the United States, and threatened to sour diplomatic relations between the United States and China. U.S. Department of State, Office of the Historian.

Chinese Immigration and the Chinese in the United States.  Provides information about materials in the National Archives related to Chinese immigrants, the various Chinese exclusion laws, and other topics courtesy. 

Chinese Immigration and the Transcontinental Railroad.   Follow the links at the bottom for more information.  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Chinese Immigration to the United States, 1851-1900Students visiting this site will find a collection of remarkable historical documents and excerpts from books that focus on the Chinese immigrant experience in the late nineteenth century. Read Mark Twain's impressions of the Chinese people in California or a letter written by several Chinese men to President Grant protesting the treatment of the Chinese in the United States. Visitors to this site will find these and many other documents exploring Chinese immigration to the U.S.  Library of Congress.

Chinese Servants in the American West : A paper presented by Terry Abraham, University of Idaho Library, at the Joint Regional Conference Hawai'i/Pacific and Pacific Northwest Association for Asian American Studies, Honolulu, March 26, 1996.

The Earliest Chinese in Grand Rapids - Compiled by the Grand Rapids Historical Commission, September 30, 2007.

Fusang : The Chinese Who Build America :  The Chinese Railroad Men, chapter 10.  The entire book is available in the Main Library E184.C5 S76 1979

In the Forest of Gold Mountain : The Chinese Experience at Lake Tahoe.  U.S. Forest Service.

Searching for Gold Mountain: Chinese Immigration.  Library of Congress.  Chinese immigrants have come to America seeking a good life for their families for over 150 years. Chinese Americans have created a lasting legacy in the United States. Many Chinese first came during the California Gold Rush. San Francisco was known as Gum Saan - "Gold Mountain" - a place of freedom and prosperity. "Gold Mountain Travelers" were part of an exodus from Southeast China. Before 1900, economic problems at home and job opportunities abroad caused about 2.5 million people to leave China. More than 322,000 Chinese came to the United States between 1850 and 1882.

Taiwanese Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Taiwanese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Filipino Americans

Americans of Filipino Descent : FAQs : A compilation of information by a librarian at UCLA.

Ancestors in the Americas. A PBS series exploring the history and legacy of Asians in the Americas by Loni Ding.  Center for Educational Telecommunications.

Filipino Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Filipino Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Filipino American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Japanese Americans

Densho Archive: Japanese American Legacy Project - The Densho Digital Archive holds over 550 visual histories (more than 1,100 hours of recorded video interviews) and over 10,800 historic photos, documents, and newspapers. The archive is growing as Densho continues to record life histories and collect images and records. These primary sources document the Japanese American experience from immigration in the early 1900s through redress in the 1980s with a strong focus on the World War II mass incarceration.  Also listed under Primary Sources.

Exploring the Japanese American Internment Through Film & the Internet : "This website was created as a public education resource for educators, students and the broader public. Produced by the National Asian American Telecommunications Association (NAATA), it utilizes a rich collection of video clips as a starting point for examining the many aspects and implications of the Japanese American internment." (NAATA)

Fred Korematsu wikipedia entryKorematsu Toyosaburō?, January 30, 1919 – March 30, 2005) was one of the many Japanese-American citizens living on the West Coast of the United States at the onset of World War II. Shortly after the Imperial Japanese Navy attacked Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, authorizing the Secretary of War and his military commanders to remove all individuals of Japanese ancestry from designated "military areas" and place them in internment camps in what is known as the Japanese American internment. When such orders were issued for the West Coast, Korematsu instead became a fugitive. The legality of the internment order was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States, but Korematsu's conviction was overturned decades later after the disclosure of new evidence challenging the necessity of the internment, evidence which had been withheld from the courts by the U.S. government during the war.  To commemorate his journey as a civil rights activist, the "Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution" was observed for the first time on January 30, 2011, by the state of California, and first such commemoration for an Asian American in the US. In 2015, Virginia passed legislation to make it the second state to permanently recognize each January 30 as Fred Korematsu Day.[1The Fred T. Korematsu Institute was founded in 2009 to carry on Korematsu's legacy as a civil rights advocate by educating and advocating for civil liberties for all communities.

Freedom for Some: The Japanese American Internment Experience.  This online exhibit describes the internment experience of Japanese Americans. Viewers can examine photographs, correspondence, pamphlets, and other materials from the internment camps.  The Balch Institute.

Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement : A Digital Archive Courtesy of the University of California Berkeley Bancroft Library.

Japanese American National Museum (Los Angeles) : The Japanese American National Museum is the first museum in the United States dedicated to sharing the experience of Americans of Japanese ancestry as an integral part of U.S. history. Through its comprehensive collection of Japanese American objects, images and documents, as well as multi-faceted exhibitions, educational programs, documentaries and publications, the National Museum shares the Japanese American story with a national and international audience.  Be sure to visit the collections and research section of the web site.

Japanese AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Japanese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Japanese Immigration to the United States.  Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

KUED Topaz Residents Photograph Collection : The photos in this collection document the lives of Japanese American men, women, and children as they faced evacuation from their California homes in 1942 and internment at the Topaz Internment Camp, near Delta, Utah.

A More Perfect Union : Japanese American and the U.S. Constitution : During the opening months of World War II, almost 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of them citizens of the United States, were forced out of their homes and into detention camps established by the U.S. government. Many would spend the next three years living under armed guard, behind barbed wire. This exhibit explores this period when racial prejudice and fear upset the delicate balance between the rights of the citizen and the power of the state. It tells the story of Japanese Americans who suffered a great injustice at the hands of the government, and who have struggled ever since to insure the rights of all citizens guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

National Japanese American Historical Society (San Francisco) : The National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS), founded in 1980 in San Francisco, is a non-profit membership supported organization dedicated to the collection, preservation, authentic interpretation, and sharing of historical information of the Japanese American experience for the diverse broader national community. Originally named Go For Broke, NJAHS changed its name in 1986 to reflect its efforts to share the broader story of this community.

Nikkei Chicago.  Documenting the untold stories of Nikkei (Japanese American) Chicago.

Return to the Valley : The Japanese-American Experience After WWII : Return to the Valley is a documentary and educational project launched by KTEH in 2003. The documentary that premiered on PBS in June 2003, is a one-hour program about the resettlement experiences of Japanese Americans after World War II. The documentary is set in the Santa Clara, Salinas, and Pajaro Valleys and the Central Coast region--areas once well known for strawberry farming and fishing. The themes of strength, perseverance and the resiliency of the human spirit transcend geography and time in this moving reflective historical documentary.  Includes a few videos and a teacher's guide.

Korean Americans

Ancestors in the Americas. A PBS series exploring the history and legacy of Asians in the Americas by Loni Ding.  Center for Educational Telecommunications

Annotated Chronology of the Korean Immigration to the United States: 1882 to 1940

Arirang: An Interactive Classroom on the Korean American Experience :A companion to a PBS program of the same name. This site covers the history of Korean-American migration and culture, including a section on the New Immigrants.

Korean American Historical Society : Founded in 1985, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enriching the collective memory of Korean Americans through collecting, maintaining, and transmitting the heritage and achievements of Koreans living in the United States and abroad.  Be sure to check out the links  and resources section.

Korean Americans. This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Korean American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Selected Websites, A-C

AAPI Voices.   Amplifying the voice of Asian Pacific America.

Afghan Americans. A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Americans of Filipino Descent : FAQs : A compilation of information by a librarian at UCLA.  ==> Filipino Americans

Ancestors in the Americas. A PBS series exploring the history and legacy of Asians in the Americas by Loni Ding.  Center for Educational Telecommunications. ==> Chinese Americans, Filipino Americans, Asian Indian Americans

Annotated Chronology of the Korean Immigration to the United States: 1882 to 1940 ==> Korean Americans

Arirang: An Interactive Classroom on the Korean American Experience :A companion to a PBS program of the same name. This site covers the history of Korean-American migration and culture, including a section on the New Immigrants. ==> Korean American.

Armenian Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Asian American Digital Collection : Some digitized materials from the MSU Libraries Special Collections.

Asian-American History Timeline  (InfoPlease)

Asian American Life via CUNY-TV.   Asian American Life is an in-depth news magazine program that addresses topical issues affecting the Asian American communities nationwide and profiles Asian American leaders.  Episodes are available online.

Asian American Life via Facebook

Asian American Voices from Huffington Post.

Asian American Voices 2010 (Vimeo).  Asian American Voices was produced in collaboration with Asian Americans for Community Involvement, a social services agency, for web distribution and community group screenings.  The piece is used as a means to raise awareness, initiate community dialogue and help formulate policy. The short documentary tells the personal stories of three recent Asian American immigrants in Silicon Valley in the context of the history of contributions made by Asian immigrants as they overcame language, cultural and health care barriers.

Asian Americans Then and Now : Linking Past to Present.  Center for Global Education.

Asian Indian AmericansA review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures. ==> Asian Indian Americans

Asian-Nation: The Landscape of Asian America : Asian American History, Culture, and Issues. Run by a scholar at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, this site aims to serve as "an authoritative, one-stop information resource and sociological exploration of the historical, demographic, political, and cultural issues that make up today's diverse Asian American community"  Courtesy of Cuong Nguyen Le, University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (May): A collection of resources courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (May): A collection of resources by the National Park Service.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (May): A collection of resources courtesy of the U.S. Department of Defense.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Month  (May): A collection of resources courtesy of InfoPlease.

Asian Pacific American Heritage Teaching Resources.  Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution.

Asian Pacific Americans for Progress . This web site brings together a network of progressive Asian Americans, Pacific Islanders, and their allies. Their mission is our goal is to advance a progressive agenda and empower Asian Pacific Americans.

Asian Pacific Island American Heritage : courtesy of Awesome Stories.

Asian Pacific American History and Culture : courtesy of the Encyclopedia Smithsonian.

Asian Voices : Digital History : American history courses typically begin on the Atlantic seaboard—either in Jamestown or in Plymouth—and trace the movement of European Americans gradually westward. But this approach is quite misleading. The first Americans arrived from northeastern Asia, and in later years Asians and Pacific Islanders played crucial, if often unrecognized roles, in shaping American history.  A digital project by the University of Houston.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Bangladeshi and Pakistani American communities, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Bangladeshi AmericansA review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Becoming American : The Chinese Experience.  A companion website to the PBS documentary. 

Burmese AmericaansA review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures

Cambodian Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Cambodian AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Cambodian American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

A Celebration of Women Writers : Asian American WritersThe Celebration of Women Writers recognizes the contributions of women writers throughout history. Women have written almost every imaginable type of work: novels, poems, letters, biographies, travel books, religious commentaries, histories, economic and scientific works. Our goal is to promote awareness of the breadth and variety of women's writing. All too often, works by women, and resources about women writers, are hard to find. We attempt to provide easy access to available on-line information. The Celebration provides a comprehensive listing of links to biographical and bibliographical information about women writers, and complete published books written by women. A compilation of web sites compiled by the University of Pennsylvania Libraries.

Chinese American Contribution to the Transcontinental Railroad. Central Pacific Railroad Photographic History Museum.

Chinese American Museum in Los Angeles : The Chinese American Museum (CAM) is the first such museum in Southern California dedicated to the Chinese American experience and history in this region.

Chinese Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Chinese AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Chinese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Chinese Astrology : As the legend goes, more than five hundred years ago, the great Buddha invited all of the animals of creation to come and join him for the New Year. Only twelve species came at his invitation and to reward them, the divine wise man offered to name a year after each animal. From then on any person born in a year associated with that animal would share that animal's qualities. Those Animals were: the RAT, the OX, the TIGER, the RABBIT, the DRAGON, the SNAKE, the HORSE, the GOAT, the MONKEY, the ROOSTER, the DOG and the PIG. This was symboloised by the ordering in which they came, the Rat was first, followed by the Ox, and so on. Other traditions replace the Ox with the Buffalo, the Rabbit with the Cat or the Hare, the Goat with the Sheep or the Ram and the Pig with the Boar.

Chinese Historical Society of America : The Chinese Historical Society of America, conceived in San Francisco in the fall of 1962, was incorporated as a not-for-profit organization on January 5, 1963. The Society is the first such Chinese American historical society in North America. Its first major publication, A History of the Chinese in California: A Syllabus has become a classic resource book used by students, historians, educators, and scholars in their research and writing about the Chinese in America. To accommodate our expanding programs and exhibitions, CHSA opened the Chinese Historical Society of America Museum and Learning Center in the historic Julia Morgan Chinese YWCA building in November 2001.  Check out the web links.

Chinese Immigration and the Chinese Exclusion Acts.  In the 1850s, Chinese workers migrated to the United States, first to work in the gold mines, but also to take agricultural jobs, and factory work, especially in the garment industry. Chinese immigrants were particularly instrumental in building railroads in the American west, and as Chinese laborers grew successful in the United States, a number of them became entrepreneurs in their own right. As the numbers of Chinese laborers increased, so did the strength of anti-Chinese sentiment among other workers in the American economy. This finally resulted in legislation that aimed to limit future immigration of Chinese workers to the United States, and threatened to sour diplomatic relations between the United States and China. U.S. Department of State, Office of the Historian.

Chinese Immigration and the Chinese in the United States.  Provides information about materials in the National Archives related to Chinese immigrants, the various Chinese exclusion laws, and other topics courtesy. 

Chinese Immigration and the Transcontinental Railroad.   Follow the links at the bottom for more information.  U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Chinese Immigration to the United States, 1851-1900Students visiting this site will find a collection of remarkable historical documents and excerpts from books that focus on the Chinese immigrant experience in the late nineteenth century. Read Mark Twain's impressions of the Chinese people in California or a letter written by several Chinese men to President Grant protesting the treatment of the Chinese in the United States. Visitors to this site will find these and many other documents exploring Chinese immigration to the U.S.  Library of Congress.

Chinese Servants in the American West : A paper presented by Terry Abraham, University of Idaho Library, at the Joint Regional Conference Hawai'i/Pacific and Pacific Northwest Association for Asian American Studies, Honolulu, March 26, 1996.

Selected Websites, D-H

Densho Archive: Japanese American Legacy Project - The Densho Digital Archive holds over 550 visual histories (more than 1,100 hours of recorded video interviews) and over 10,800 historic photos, documents, and newspapers. The archive is growing as Densho continues to record life histories and collect images and records. These primary sources document the Japanese American experience from immigration in the early 1900s through redress in the 1980s with a strong focus on the World War II mass incarceration.  Also listed under Primary Sources.

The Earliest Chinese in Grand Rapids - Compiled by the Grand Rapids Historical Commission, September 30, 2007

Exploring the Japanese American Internment Through Film & the Internet : "This website was created as a public education resource for educators, students and the broader public. Produced by the National Asian American Telecommunications Association (NAATA), it utilizes a rich collection of video clips as a starting point for examining the many aspects and implications of the Japanese American internment." (NAATA)

Filipino Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Filipino Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Filipino American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Fred Korematsu wikipedia entryKorematsu Toyosaburō?, January 30, 1919 – March 30, 2005) was one of the many Japanese-American citizens living on the West Coast of the United States at the onset of World War II. Shortly after the Imperial Japanese Navy attacked Pearl Harbor, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, authorizing the Secretary of War and his military commanders to remove all individuals of Japanese ancestry from designated "military areas" and place them in internment camps in what is known as the Japanese American internment. When such orders were issued for the West Coast, Korematsu instead became a fugitive. The legality of the internment order was upheld by the United States Supreme Court in Korematsu v. United States, but Korematsu's conviction was overturned decades later after the disclosure of new evidence challenging the necessity of the internment, evidence which had been withheld from the courts by the U.S. government during the war.  To commemorate his journey as a civil rights activist, the "Fred Korematsu Day of Civil Liberties and the Constitution" was observed for the first time on January 30, 2011, by the state of California, and first such commemoration for an Asian American in the US. In 2015, Virginia passed legislation to make it the second state to permanently recognize each January 30 as Fred Korematsu Day.[1The Fred T. Korematsu Institute was founded in 2009 to carry on Korematsu's legacy as a civil rights advocate by educating and advocating for civil liberties for all communities.

Freedom for Some: The Japanese American Internment Experience.  This online exhibit describes the internment experience of Japanese Americans. Viewers can examine photographs, correspondence, pamphlets, and other materials from the internment camps.  The Balch Institute.

Fusang : The Chinese Who Build America :  The Chinese Railroad Men, chapter 10.  The entire book is available in the Main Library E184.C5 S76 1979

Guide to the Papers of Asian American Artists : Highlights hundreds of unique collections in the Smithsonian Archives of American Art which demonstrate the involvement and influence of Asian Americans in the visual arts.  Notable artists represented here include jewelry designer Miye Matsukata, painter and muralist Eitaro Ishigaki, painter and illustrator Dong Kingman, sculptor Isamu Noguchi, video artist and printmaker Norie Sato, ceramists Toshiko Takaezu and Patti Warashina, and painter and printmaker Seong Moy. The Archives also has especially strong documentation relating to the 20th century painter, printmaker and photographer Yasuo Kuniyoshi. This guide was begun in May 1999 in recognition of the Smithsonian Institution's Asian Pacific American Heritage Month; it was revised and expanded in 2008 with support from the Terra Foundation for American Art.

Hawaiian AmericansA review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures

A historical perspective of Americans of Asian Indian origin, 1790-1997Srirajasekhar Bobby Koritala

Hmong Americans.  A review article courtesy of Countries and their cultures.

Hmong AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Hmong American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

The Hmong in America : A Story of Tragedy and Hope. Welcome to "The Tragedy of the Hmong," a page by Jeff Lindsay dedicated to understanding the Hmong people in the United States, and the tragic events that brought them here. Few people know their history, their role in fighting for the US in the Vietnam War, and the challenges they face today in this strange country.

HmongNet Portal : The WWW Hmong Homepage, first made available on the Internet in March, 1994, is a volunteer effort bringing together a collection the Internet-based resources related to Hmong news and current-events, issues, history, publications, and culture.

In the Forest of Gold Mountain : The Chinese Experience at Lake Tahoe.  U.S. Forest Service.

Indian Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Indian American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Selected Web Sites, J-Z

Japanese American Evacuation and Resettlement : A Digital Archive Courtesy of the University of California Berkeley Bancroft Library.

Japanese American National Museum (Los Angeles) : The Japanese American National Museum is the first museum in the United States dedicated to sharing the experience of Americans of Japanese ancestry as an integral part of U.S. history. Through its comprehensive collection of Japanese American objects, images and documents, as well as multi-faceted exhibitions, educational programs, documentaries and publications, the National Museum shares the Japanese American story with a national and international audience.  Be sure to visit the collections and research section of the web site.

Japanese AmericansThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Japanese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Japanese Immigration to the United States.  Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Journey from Gold Mountain: The Asian American Experience Curriculum and Resource Guide.   Japanese American Citizens League.

Korean American Historical Society : Founded in 1985, a nonprofit organization dedicated to enriching the collective memory of Korean Americans through collecting, maintaining, and transmitting the heritage and achievements of Koreans living in the United States and abroad.  Be sure to check out the links  and resources section.

Korean Americans. This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Korean American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

KUED Topaz Residents Photograph Collection : The photos in this collection document the lives of Japanese American men, women, and children as they faced evacuation from their California homes in 1942 and internment at the Topaz Internment Camp, near Delta, Utah.

Laotian Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Laotian American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

A More Perfect Union : Japanese American and the U.S. Constitution : During the opening months of World War II, almost 120,000 Japanese Americans, two-thirds of them citizens of the United States, were forced out of their homes and into detention camps established by the U.S. government. Many would spend the next three years living under armed guard, behind barbed wire. This exhibit explores this period when racial prejudice and fear upset the delicate balance between the rights of the citizen and the power of the state. It tells the story of Japanese Americans who suffered a great injustice at the hands of the government, and who have struggled ever since to insure the rights of all citizens guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.

National Japanese American Historical Society (San Francisco) : The National Japanese American Historical Society (NJAHS), founded in 1980 in San Francisco, is a non-profit membership supported organization dedicated to the collection, preservation, authentic interpretation, and sharing of historical information of the Japanese American experience for the diverse broader national community. Originally named Go For Broke, NJAHS changed its name in 1986 to reflect its efforts to share the broader story of this community.

Native Hawaiians and Pacific IslandersThis article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Nikkei Chicago.  Documenting the untold stories of Nikkei (Japanese American) Chicago.

Return to the Valley : The Japanese-American Experience After WWII : Return to the Valley is a documentary and educational project launched by KTEH in 2003. The documentary that premiered on PBS in June 2003, is a one-hour program about the resettlement experiences of Japanese Americans after World War II. The documentary is set in the Santa Clara, Salinas, and Pajaro Valleys and the Central Coast region--areas once well known for strawberry farming and fishing. The themes of strength, perseverance and the resiliency of the human spirit transcend geography and time in this moving reflective historical documentary.  Includes a few videos and a teacher's guide.

SEAAdoc: Documenting the Southeast Asian American Experience : An educational resource of the Southeast Asian Archive at the UC Irvine Libraries focusing on post-1975 refugees and immigrants from Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam and the communities they have developed in the United States.

Searching for Gold Mountain: Chinese Immigration.  Library of Congress.  Chinese immigrants have come to America seeking a good life for their families for over 150 years. Chinese Americans have created a lasting legacy in the United States. Many Chinese first came during the California Gold Rush. San Francisco was known as Gum Saan - "Gold Mountain" - a place of freedom and prosperity. "Gold Mountain Travelers" were part of an exodus from Southeast China. Before 1900, economic problems at home and job opportunities abroad caused about 2.5 million people to leave China. More than 322,000 Chinese came to the United States between 1850 and 1882.

Taiwanese Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Taiwanese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

Teaching a People's History : Asian American.  The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports the teaching of people’s history in middle and high school classrooms across the country.  Its goal is to introduce students to a more accurate, complex, and engaging understanding of United States history than is found in traditional textbooks and curricula. The empowering potential of studying U.S. history is often lost in a textbook-driven trivial pursuit of names and dates. People’s history materials and pedagogy emphasize the role of working people, women, people of color, and organized social movements in shaping history. Students learn that history is made not by a few heroic individuals, but instead by people’s choices and actions, thereby also learning that their own choices and actions matter.

Teaching a People's History : Pacific Islander.  The Zinn Education Project promotes and supports the teaching of people’s history in middle and high school classrooms across the country.  Its goal is to introduce students to a more accurate, complex, and engaging understanding of United States history than is found in traditional textbooks and curricula. The empowering potential of studying U.S. history is often lost in a textbook-driven trivial pursuit of names and dates. People’s history materials and pedagogy emphasize the role of working people, women, people of color, and organized social movements in shaping history. Students learn that history is made not by a few heroic individuals, but instead by people’s choices and actions, thereby also learning that their own choices and actions matter.

VG/Voices from the Gaps.  A website based in the English Department at the University of Minnesota and dedicated to bringing together marginalized resources and knowledges about women artists of color to serve secondary and college education across the world.  Note : click on categories such as Burmese Americans, Chinese Americans, Filipinas, Hmong Americans, Indian Americans, Japanese Americans, Korean Americans, Malaysian Americans, Taiwanese Americans, Vietnamese Americans.

Vietnamese Americans.  This article is an edited chapter on the major historical events and contemporary characteristics of the Vietnamese American community, excerpted from The New Face of Asian Pacific America: Numbers, Diversity, and Change in the 21st Century, edited by Eric Lai and Dennis Arguelles in conjunction with AsianWeek Magazine and published by the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

William and Mary Government Information : Asian Americans.  A collection of government documents about Asian Americans.

Wing Luke Asian Museum (Seattle) :  Our mission is to connect everyone to the rich history, dynamic cultures and art of Asian Pacific Americans through vivid storytelling and inspiring experiences. The Wing Luke Asian Museum is a proud Smithsonian Affiliate, a partnership with the Smithsonian Institution.  

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