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Classical Studies: New Books

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Selected new publications received by the Michigan State University Main Library.  Note new books about mythology and religion are posted under that category.

Book Reviews

New Books in Classics

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Book Covers, A-B


A.D. 381 : Heretics, Pagans and the Dawn of the Monotheistic State

A.D. 381 : Heretics, Pagans and the Dawn of the Monotheistic State


AD 410 : The Year That Shook Rome

AD 410 : The Year That Shook Rome


428 AD : An Ordinary Year at the End of the Roman Empire  

428 A.D. : An Ordinary Year at the End of the Roman Empire


Adoption in the Roman World

Adoption in the Roman World


The Aeneid

The Aeneid


Alexander the Great : a New History

Alexander the Great : a New History


Alexander the Great and his empire : a short introduction

Alexander the Great and his empire : a short introduction


Alexander the Great : lessons from history's undefeated general

Alexander the Great : lessons from history's undefeated general


Alexander's Tomb : the Two Thousand Year Obsession to Find the Lost Conqueror

Alexander's Tomb : the Two Thousand Year Obsession to Find the Lost Conqueror


Allegories of Farming From Greece and Rome : Philosophical Satire in Xenophon, Varro and Virgil

Allegories of Farming From Greece and Rome : Philosophical Satire in Xenophon, Varro and Virgil


Always I Am Caesar

Always I Am Caesar


Ancient Greece : a History in Eleven Cities

Ancient Greece : a History in Eleven Cities


Ancient Greek Political Thought in Practice

Ancient Greek Political Thought in Practice


Ancient Literacies : the Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome

Ancient Literacies : the Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome


The ancient middle classes : urban life and aesthetics in the Roman Empire, 100 BCE-250 CE

The ancient middle classes : urban life and aesthetics in the Roman Empire, 100 BCE-250 CE


Antiquity Recovered : the Legacy of Pompeii and Herculaneum

Antiquity Recovered : the Legacy of Pompeii and Herculaneum


Aristophanes the Democrat : the Politics of Satirical Comedy During the Peloponnesian War

Aristophanes the Democrat : the Politics of Satirical Comedy During the Peloponnesian War


Art and Identity in Dark Age Greece, 1100--700 B.C.E.

Art and Identity in Dark Age Greece, 1100--700 B.C.E.


Art in Athens During the Peloponnesian War

Art in Athens During the Peloponnesian War


The art of Euripides : dramatic technique and social context

The art of Euripides : dramatic technique and social context


The Artistry of the Homeric Simile

The Artistry of the Homeric Simile


As Witnessed by Images : the Trojan War Tradition in Greek and Etruscan Art

As Witnessed by Images : the Trojan War Tradition in Greek and Etruscan Art


The Athenian Empire

The Athenian Empire


Athena's Justice : Athena, Athens and the Concept of Justice in Greek Tragedy

Athena's Justice : Athena, Athens and the Concept of Justice in Greek Tragedy


Attila the Hun : Barbarian Terror and the Fall of the Roman Empire

Attila the Hun : Barbarian Terror and the Fall of the Roman Empire


Barbarian Tides : the Migration Age and the Later Roman Empire

Barbarian Tides : the Migration Age and the Later Roman Empire


The Battle of Marathon

The Battle of Marathon


Becoming Byzantine : Children and Childhood in Byzantium  

Becoming Byzantine : Children and Childhood in Byzantium


Belisarius : the Last Roman General

Belisarius : the Last Roman General


Blood of the Caesars : How the Murder of Germanicus Led to the Fall of Rome

Blood of the Caesars : How the Murder of Germanicus Led to the Fall of Rome


Boudica and Her Stories : narrative Transformations of a Warrior Queen

Boudica and Her Stories : narrative Transformations of a Warrior Queen


Bound by the City : Greek Tragedy, Sexual Difference, and the Formation of the Polis

Bound by the City : Greek Tragedy, Sexual Difference, and the Formation of the Polis


Byzantium : the Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire  

Byzantium : the Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire


Book Covers, C-D


A cabinet of Roman curiosities : strange tales and surprising facts from the world's greatest empire

A cabinet of Roman curiosities : strange tales and surprising facts from the world's greatest empire


Caesar : a Life in Western Culture

Caesar : a Life in Western Culture


Caesar's Calendar : Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History

Caesar's Calendar : Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History


 

The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity

 

The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity


Carthage must be destroyed : the rise and fall of an ancient civilization

Carthage must be destroyed : the rise and fall of an ancient civilization


Chariton of Aphrodisias and the invention of the Greek love novel

Chariton of Aphrodisias and the invention of the Greek love novel


The Christian Parthenon : classicism and pilgrimage in Byzantine Athens

The Christian Parthenon : classicism and pilgrimage in Byzantine Athens


Christian responses to Roman art and architecture : the second-century church amid the spaces of empire

Christian responses to Roman art and architecture : the second-century church amid the spaces of empire


Cicero's Philosophy of History

Cicero's Philosophy of History


Civic rites : democracy and religion in ancient Athens

Civic rites : democracy and religion in ancient Athens


The Classical Tradition

The Classical Tradition


Cleopatra : a biography

Cleopatra : a biography


A Companion to Horace

A Companion to Horace


A companion to Roman imperialism

A companion to Roman imperialism


A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and Its Tradition

A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and Its Tradition


The Complete Pompeii

The Complete Pompeii


The Conquests of Alexander the Great

The Conquests of Alexander the Great


Contemporary Athletics & Ancient Greek Ideals

Contemporary Athletics & Ancient Greek Ideals


Contested Triumphs : Politics, Pageantry, and Performance in Livy's Republican Rome

Contested Triumphs : Politics, Pageantry, and Performance in Livy's Republican Rome


Controlling Desires : Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome

Controlling Desires : Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome


Critical Moments in Classical Literature : Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and Its Uses

Critical Moments in Classical Literature : Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and Its Uses


Daughters of Gaia : Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World

Critical Moments in Classical Literature : Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and Its Uses


Death in Ancient Rome

Death in Ancient Rome


The Deaths of Seneca  

The Deaths of Senaca


The Defeat of Rome in the East : Crassus, the Parthians, and the Disastrous Battle of Carrhae, 53 BC

The Defeat of Rome in the East : Crassus, the Parthians, and the Disastrous Battle of Carrhae, 53 BC


Delphi and Olympia : the spatial politics of panhellenism in the archaic and classical periods

Delphi and Olympia : the spatial politics of panhellenism in the archaic and classical periods


The Derveni Krater : Masterpiece of Classical Greek Metalwork

The Derveni Krater : Masterpiece of Classical Greek Metalwork


Dining as a Roman emperor : how to cook ancient Roman recipes today

Dining as a Roman emperor : how to cook ancient Roman recipes today


Dining Posture in Ancient Rome : Bodies, Values, and Status

Dining Posture in Ancient Rome : Bodies, Values, and Status


Divine Qualities : Cult and Community in Republican Rome

Divine Qualities : Cult and Community in Republican Rome


Dreams and experience in classical antiquity

Dreams and experience in classical antiquity


Book Covers, E-G


The Economy of the Greek Cities : From the Archaic Period to the Early Roman Empire

The Economy of the Greek Cities : From the Archaic Period to the Early Roman Empire


The Emperor Elagabalus : fact or fiction

The Emperor Elagabalus : fact or fiction


Empires and Barbarians : the Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe

Empires and Barbarians : the Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe


The End of Empire : Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome

The End of Empire : Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome


Everyday writing in the Graeco-Roman East

Everyday writing in the Graeco-Roman East


The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek

The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek


The Fall of the Roman Household

The Fall of the Roman Household


The Fall of the West : The Slow Death of the Roman Superpower

The Fall of the West : The Slow Death of the Roman Superpower


Family Fictions in Roman Art

Family Fictions in Roman Art


The female portrait statue in the Greek world

The female portrait statue in the Greek world


The Fires of Vesuvius : Pompeii Lost and Found

The Fires of Vesuvius : Pompeii Lost and Found


Funny Words in Plautine Comedy

Funny Words in Plautine Comedy


Ghost on the throne : the death of Alexander the Great and the war for crown and empire

Ghost on the throne : the death of Alexander the Great and the war for crown and empire


The ghosts of Cannae : Hannibal and the darkest hour of the Roman republic

The ghosts of Cannae : Hannibal and the darkest hour of the Roman republic


Gods and Goddesses in the Garden : Greco-Roman Mythology and The Scientific Names of Plants

Funny Words in Plautine Comedy


Great Battles of the Hellenistic World

Great Battles of the Hellenistic World


Great Moments in Greek Archaeology

Great Moments in Greek Archaeology


Greek and Roman Education : A Sourcebook

Greek and Roman Education : A Sourcebook


Greek and Roman Folklore : A Handbook

Greek and Roman Folklore : A Handbook


Greek and Roman historiography

Greek and Roman historiography


Greek Architecture and Its Sculpture

Greek Architecture and Its Sculpture


Greek Art and the Orient

Greek Art and the Orient


The Greek Poets : Homer to the Present

The Greek Poets : Homer to the Present


Greek Thought : A Guide to Classical Knowledge

Greek Thought : A Guide to Classical Knowledge


Greek Tragedy and Political Philosophy : Rationalism and Religion in Sophocles' Theban Plays

Greek Tragedy and Political Philosophy : Rationalism and Religion in Sophocles' Theban Plays


Greek Vase-Painting and the Origins of Visual Humour

Greek Vase-Painting and the Origins of Visual Humour


Greek warfare : from the Battle of Marathon to the conquests of Alexander the Great

Greek warfare : from the Battle of Marathon to the conquests of Alexander the Great


The Greeks and their past : poetry, oratory and history in the fifth century BCE

The Greeks and their past : poetry, oratory and history in the fifth century BCE


Greeks on the Black Sea : Ancient Art from the Hermitage

Greeks on the Black Sea : Ancient Art from the Hermitage


Growing Up Fatherless in Antiquity

Growing Up Fatherless in Antiquity


New Books, A

A.D. 381 : Heretics, Pagans and the Dawn of the Monotheistic State / Charles Freeman.  Woodstock, NY : Overlook Press, 2009.  252pp.  Main Library BR217 .F744 2009 : In AD 381, Theodosius, emperor of the eastern Roman empire, issued a decree in which all his subjects were required to subscribe to a belief in the Trinity of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. This edict defined Christian orthodoxy and brought to an end a lively and wide-ranging debate about the nature of God; all other interpretations were now declared heretical. It was the first time in a thousand years of Greco-Roman civilization free thought was unambiguously suppressed. Yet surprisingly, the popular histories claim that the Christian Church reached a consensus on the Trinity at the Council of Constantinople in AD 381. Why has Theodosius's revolution been airbrushed from the historical record?  In this groundbreaking new book, acclaimed historian Charles Freeman shows that the council was in fact a sham, only taking place after Theodosius's decree had become law. The Church was acquiescing in the overwhelming power of the emperor. Freeman argues that Theodosius's edict and the subsequent suppression of paganism not only brought an end to the diversity of religious and philosophical beliefs throughout the empire, but created numerous theological problems for the Church, which have remained unsolved. The year AD 381, as Freeman puts it, was "a turning point which time forgot."  Also listed under Mythology and Religion.

AD 410: The Year That Shook Rome / Sam Moorhead & David Stuttard.  London : British Museum Press, c2010.  14pp.  Main Library DG311 .M667 2010 : The Goths' sack of Rome in AD 410 was an event which shook the Roman world to its core. This gripping book uncovers the key factors that contributed to Alaric the Goth's capture of Rome: mass migrations, military incompetence, civil war, court intrigue, economic decline and religious bigotry. It also explains the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, including the loss of Britain, around AD 410. Telling a truly compelling story of a defining moment in history, the book is packed with dramatic characters and events. Bold personalities are brought to life, drawn from sources newly translated for this book by master storytellers thoroughly familiar with their subject. Although many have asked why Rome fell, few have told the tale of how it fell. The dramatic story is richly illustrated throughout with evocative sites and iconic objects, many drawn from the vast collections of the British Museum.  Online book review.

428 AD : An Ordinary Year at the End of the Roman Empire / Giusto Traina ; translated by Allan Cameron. Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2009. 203pp. Main Library DG338 .T7313 2009 : This is a sweeping tour of the Mediterranean world from the Atlantic to Persia during the last half-century of the Roman Empire. By focusing on a single year not overshadowed by an epochal event, 428 AD provides a truly fresh look at a civilization in the midst of enormous change--as Christianity takes hold in rural areas across the empire, as western Roman provinces fall away from those in the Byzantine east, and as power shifts from Rome to Constantinople. Retracing the kind of route a contemporary gazetteer might have taken, Giusto Traina describes the empire's people, places, and events in all their simultaneous richness and variety. The result is an original snapshot of a fraying Roman world on the edge of the medieval era. Readers meet many important figures, including the Roman general Flavius Dionysius as he encounters a delegation from Persia after the Sassanids annex Armenia; the Christian ascetic Simeon Stylites as he stands and preaches atop his column near Antioch; the eastern Roman emperor Theodosius II as he prepares to commission his legal code; and Genseric as he is elected king of the Vandals and begins to turn his people into a formidable power. We are also introduced to Pulcheria, the powerful sister of Theodosius, and Galla Placidia, the queen mother of the western empire, as well as Augustine, Pope Celestine I, and Roman emperor Valentinian III. Full of telling details, 428 AD illustrates the uneven march of history. As the west unravels, the east remains intact. As Christianity spreads, pagan ideas and schools persist. And, despite the presence of the forces that will eventually tear the classical world apart, Rome remains at the center, exerting a powerful unifying force over disparate peoples stretched across the Mediterranean. 

Adoption in the Roman World / Hugh Lindsay.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  242pp.  Main Library HV875.58.R57 L56 2009 : Adoption in other cultures and other times provides a background to understanding the operation of adoption in the Roman worlds. This book considers the relationship of adoption to kinship structures in the Greek and Roman world. The impact of adoption on inheritance arrangements is considered, including an account of how the families of freedmen were affected. Its use as a mode of succession at Rome is detailed, and this helps to understand the anxiety of childless Romans to procure a son through adoption, rather than simply to nominate heirs in their wills. The strategy also had political uses, and importantly it was used to rearrange natural succession in the imperial family. The book concludes with political adoptions, looking at the detailed case studies of Clodius and Octavian.

The Aeneid / Virgil ; translated by Robert Fagles ; introduction by Bernard KnoxNew York : Viking, 2006. 486pp.  Main Library PA6807.A5 F25 2006 : Aeneas flees the ashes of Troy to found the city of Rome and change forever the course of the Western world--as literature as well. Virgil's Aeneid is as eternal as Rome itself, a sweeping epic of arms and heroism--the searching portrait of a man caught between love and duty, human feeling and the force of fate--that has influenced writers for over 2,000 years. Filled with drama, passion, and the universal pathos that only a masterpiece can express. The Aeneid is a book for all the time and all people.

Alexander the Great : a New History / edited by Waldemar Heckel and Lawrence A. Tritle.  Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2009.  366pp.  Main Library DF234 .A4857 2009 : Combines traditional scholarship with contemporary research to offer an innovative treatment of one of history’s most famous figures. (1) Written by leading experts in the field; (2) Looks at a wide range of diverse topics including Alexander’s religious views, his entourage during his campaign East, his sexuality, the influence of his legacy, and his representations in art and cinema; (3) Discusses Alexander’s influence, from his impact on his contemporaries to his portrayals in recent Hollywood films; (4) A highly informed and enjoyable resource for students and interested general readers.

Alexander the Great and his empire : a short introduction / Pierre Briant ; translated by Amélie Kuhrt.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2010.  192pp.  Main Library DF234.37 .B7413 2010  : This is the first publication in English of Pierre Briant's classic short history of Alexander the Great's conquest of the Persian empire, from the Mediterranean to Central Asia. Eschewing a conventional biographical focus, this is the only book in any language that sets the rise of Alexander's short-lived empire within the broad context of ancient Near Eastern history under Achaemenid Persian rule, as well as against Alexander's Macedonian background. As a renowned historian of both the Macedonians and the Persians, Briant is uniquely able to assess Alexander's significance from the viewpoint of both the conquerors and the conquered, and to trace what changed and what stayed the same as Alexander and the Hellenistic world gained ascendancy over Darius's Persia.After a short account of Alexander's life before his landing in Asia Minor, the book gives a brief overview of the major stages of his conquest. This background sets the stage for a series of concise thematic chapters that explore the origins and objectives of the conquest; the nature and significance of the resistance it met; how the conquered lands were administered, defended, and exploited; the varying nature of Alexander's relations with the Macedonians, Greeks, and Persians; and the problems of succession following Alexander's death.For this translation, Briant has written a new foreword and conclusion, updated the main text and the thematic annotated bibliography, and added a substantial appendix in which he assesses the current state of Alexander historiography and suggests some directions for future research. More than ever, this masterful work provides an original and important perspective on Alexander and his empire.

Alexander the Great : lessons from history's undefeated general / Bill Yenne. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. 204pp.  Main Library DF234 .Y46 2010 : Alexander the Great is considered one of the most successful commanders of all time and was known to be undefeated in battle. He is mentioned in the Bible as well as the Qur'an, and is on the shortest of short lists whenever the world's best military leaders are catalogued. When asked to name other great military leaders, Caesar reportedly said Alexander was the only great one. Born in 356 B.C., the son of Philip II of Macedonia, Alexander the Great was educated by Aristotle, became a consummate horseman, and commanded a wing of his father's army in the victory over the Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea -- all when he was still a teenager. By the time of his death at age 32, he had united Greece and had amassed an empire that stretched from the Adriatic Sea to the Indus River and included all of Persia and most of Egypt. He ruled as both the shah of Persia and as a pharaoh of Egypt by right of conquest, and he was also crowned king of Asia. As Yenne shows in this masterful biography, Alexander's influence on the course of cultural and political history and the scope of his military prowess remains awe-inspiring to this day.

Alexander's Tomb : the Two Thousand Year Obsession to Find the Lost Conqueror / Nicholas J. Saunders.  New York : Basic Books, c2006.  290pp.  Main Library DF234.2 .S28 2006 : Alexander the Great is a towering figure in world history, but despite our long-held fascination with him, his burial site is unknown. Alexander’s Tomb is the epic tale of the ongoing quest to unlock one of the world’s great mysteries.

All Things Julius Caesar  : an encyclopedia of Caesar's world and legacy / Michael Lovano.  Santa Barbara, California : Greenwood, an imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC, 2015.  2 volumes (956 pages)   Main Library DG261 .L67 2015 : Julius Caesar's life and example have fascinated and motivated generations of people for nearly 2,000 years. This book explores the people, places, events, and institutions that helped define arguably the most famous individual in the history of Rome.

Allegories of Farming From Greece and Rome : Philosophical Satire in Xenophon, Varro and Virgil / Leah Kronenberg.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  223pp.  Main Library PA3015.A37 K76 2009  : In this book Professor Kronenberg shows that Xenophon's Oeconomicus, Varro's De Re Rustica and Virgil's Georgics are not simply works on farming but belong to a tradition of philosophical satire which uses allegory and irony to question the meaning of morality. These works metaphorically connect farming and its related arts to political life; but instead of presenting farming in its traditional guise as a positive symbol, they use it to model the deficiencies of the active life, which in turn is juxtaposed to a preferred contemplative way of life. Although these three texts are not usually treated together, this book convincingly connects them with an original and provocative interpretation of their allegorical use of farming. It also fills an important gap in our understanding of the literary influences on the Georgics by showing that it is shaped not just by its poetic predecessors but by philosophical dialogue.

Always I Am Caesar / W. Jeffrey Tatum.  Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2008.  198pp.  Main Library DG261 .T38 2008 : There are few episodes in world history that can truly be labeled epoch-making – but Rome’s shift from republic to empire was certainly one of them. It happened after ancient Rome was plunged into civil war and Gaius Julius Caesar emerged victorious. Military genius, tyrant, brilliant politician, first class orator, sophisticated man of letters – Caesar was all of these and more. But above all, he was the catalyst of a great upheaval that was considered Rome’s ultimate destiny. Always I Am Caesar is a vivid portrait of Caesar’s life and times. The text goes well beyond the biographical details of his life, however, and examines his career through a variety of perspectives – from military conquests and political victories to his relationships with women and elevation to godlike status. Looking at Caesar in the context of Roman society provides us with a richer portrait of the man whose name has become synonymous with the Roman Empire itself. Accessible to all, Always I Am Caesar is a lively and engaging window into the life and times of ancient Rome during its transition from republic to empire.

Ancient Greece : a History in Eleven Cities / Paul Cartledge.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  261pp.  Main Library DF77 .C34 2009 : The contribution of the ancient Greeks to modern western culture is incalculable. In the worlds of art, architecture, myth, literature, and philosophy, the world we live in would be unrecognizable without the formative influence of ancient Greek models....This highly original and stimulating introduction to ancient Greece takes the city as its starting point, revealing just how central the polis ("city-state" or "citizen-state") was to Hellenistic cultural achievements. In particular, Paul Cartledge uses the history of eleven major Greek cities--out of more than a thousand--to illuminate the most important and informative aspects of Greek history. The book spans a surprisingly long time period, ranging from the first examples of ancient Greek language from Cnossus in Crete around 1400 BC to the establishment of Constantinople (today's Istanbul) in 324 AD on the site of the Greek city of Byzantion. Cartledge highlights the role of such renowned cities as Athens (birthplace of democracy) and Sparta, but he also examines Argos, Thebes, Syracuse in Sicily, and Alexandria in Egypt, as well as lesser known locales such as Miletus (home of the West's first intellectual, Thales) and Massalia (Marseilles today), where the Greeks introduced the wine grape to the French. The author uses these cities to illuminate major themes, from economics, religion, and social relations, to gender and sexuality, slavery and freedom, and politics. And throughout, the book explores how these eleven cities differed both from each other and from modern society....An innovative approach to ancient Greece and its legacy, both in terms of the time span covered and in its unique city-by-city organization, this superb volume provides the ideal concise introduction to the history and culture of this remarkable civilization.

Ancient Greek Political Thought in Practice / Paul Cartledge.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  169pp.  Main Library JC73 .C368 2009 : Ancient Greece was a place of tremendous political experiment and innovation, and it was here too that the first serious political thinkers emerged. Using carefully selected case-studies, Professor Cartledge investigates the dynamic interaction between ancient Greek political thought and practice from early historic times to the early Roman Empire. Of concern throughout are three major issues: first, the relationship of political thought and practice; second, the relevance of class and status to explaining political behaviour and thinking; third, democracy - its invention, development and expansion, and extinction, prior to its recent resuscitation and even apotheosis. In addition, monarchy in various forms and at different periods and the peculiar political structures of Sparta are treated in detail over a chronological range extending from Homer to Plutarch. The book provides an introduction to the topic for all students and non-specialists who appreciate the continued relevance of ancient Greece to political theory and practice today.

Ancient Literacies : the Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome / edited by William A. Johnson and Holt N. Parker. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  430pp.  Main Library  Z1003.5.G8 A53 2009 : Classicists have been slow to take advantage of the important advances in the way that literacy is viewed in other disciplines (including in particular cognitive psychology, socio-linguistics, and socio-anthropology). On the other hand, historians of literacy continue to rely on outdated work by classicists (mostly from the 1960's and 1970's) and have little access to the current reexamination of the ancient evidence. This timely volume attempts to formulate new interesting ways of talking about the entire concept of literacy in the ancient world--literacy not in the sense of whether 10% or 30% of people in the ancient world could read or write, but in the sense of text-oriented events embedded in a particular socio-cultural context. The volume is intended as a forum in which selected leading scholars rethink from the ground up how students of classical antiquity might best approach the question of literacy in the past, and how that investigation might materially intersect with changes in the way that literacy is now viewed in other disciplines. The result will give readers new ways of thinking about specific elements of "literacy" in antiquity, such as the nature of personal libraries, or what it means to be a bookseller in antiquity; new constructionist questions, such as what constitutes reading communities and how they fashion themselves; new takes on the public sphere, such as how literacy intersects with commercialism, or with the use of public spaces, or with the construction of civic identity; new essentialist questions, such as what "book" and "reading" signify in antiquity, why literate cultures develop, or why literate cultures matter. The book derives from a conference (a Semple Symposium held in Cincinnati in April 2006) and includes new work from the most outstanding scholars of literacy in antiquity (e.g., Simon Goldhill, Joseph Farrell, Peter White, and Rosalind Thomas).

The ancient middle classes : urban life and aesthetics in the Roman Empire, 100 BCE-250 CE / Emanuel Mayer.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2012.  295pp.  Main Library DG78 .M42 2012 : Our image of the Roman world is shaped by the writings of Roman statesmen and upper class intellectuals. Yet most of the material evidence we have from Roman times—art, architecture, and household artifacts from Pompeii and elsewhere—belonged to, and was made for, artisans, merchants, and professionals. Roman culture as we have seen it with our own eyes, Emanuel Mayer boldly argues, turns out to be distinctly middle class and requires a radically new framework of analysis....Starting in the first century bce, ancient communities, largely shaped by farmers living within city walls, were transformed into vibrant urban centers where wealth could be quickly acquired through commercial success. From 100 bce to 250 ce, the archaeological record details the growth of a cosmopolitan empire and a prosperous new class rising along with it. Not as keen as statesmen and intellectuals to show off their status and refinement, members of this new middle class found novel ways to create pleasure and meaning. In the décor of their houses and tombs, Mayer finds evidence that middle-class Romans took pride in their work and commemorated familial love and affection in ways that departed from the tastes and practices of social elites.

Ancient Rome : A New History / David Potter.  New York : Thames & Hudson, 2009.  352pp.  Main Library  DG209 .P68 2009 : How did the Roman world develop from a small number of people living on the banks of the Tiber to an empire encompassing some sixty-four million people spread from one end of the Mediterranean to the other? How did the Romans themselves understand this development, and did that understanding evolve over time? Incorporating contributions from economics, archaeology, anthropology, and literary criticism, David Potter's thought-provoking and accessible text shows students how Roman history works. The book is beautifully illustrated with maps, battle plans, portraits, paintings, sculpture, and more, and includes many quotes from original sources.

Antiquity Recovered : the Legacy of Pompeii and Herculaneum / edited by Victoria C. Gardner Coates and Jon L. Seydl.  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2007. 296pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection DG70.P7 A73 2007 : Beginning in 1709, when their antiquities first were recovered, Pompeii and Herculaneum have exercised the historical imagination of the West. This volume presents a diverse array of response to the sites, tracing how perceptions of the past have changed over the course of three centuries of excavations, what the editors call "the strata of interpretation." The thirteen essays range in subject from a reassessment of the contents of the library at Herculaneum's Villa of the Papyri to the symbolic appearance of the ancient world in such films as Roberto Rossellini's Voyage in Italy and Jean-Luc Godard's Contempt....Antiquity Recovered explores the complexities of "the reception of the past" and helps enhance our understanding of the roles these cities have played, and continue to play, in Western culture.

Aristophanes the Democrat : the Politics of Satirical Comedy During the Peloponnesian War / Keith Sidwell. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  407pp.  Main Library PA3879 .S53 2009 : This book provides a new interpretation of the nature of Old Comedy and its place at the heart of Athenian democratic politics. Professor Sidwell argues that Aristophanes and his rivals belonged to opposing political groups, each with their own political agenda. Through disguised caricature and parody of their rivals' work, the poets expressed and fuelled the political conflict between their factions. Professor Sidwell rereads the principal texts of Aristophanes and the fragmented remains of the work of his rivals in the light of these arguments for the political foundations of the genre.

Art and Identity in Dark Age Greece, 1100--700 B.C.E. / Susan Langdon.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.  388pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N5310.5.G8 L36 2008 : This book explores how art and material culture were used to construct age, gender, and social identity in the Greek Early Iron Age, 1100-700 BC. Coming between the collapse of the Bronze Age palaces and the creation of Archaic city-states, these four centuries witnessed fundamental cultural developments and political realignments. While previous archaeological research has emphasized class-based aspects of change, this study offers a more comprehensive view of early Greece by recognizing the place of children and women in a warrior-focused society. Combining iconographic analysis, gender theory, mortuary analysis, typological study, and object biography, Susan Langdon explores how early figural art was used to mediate critical stages in the life-course of men and women. She shows how an understanding of the artistic and material contexts of social change clarifies the emergence of distinctive gender and class asymmetries that laid the basis for classical Greek society.

Art in Athens During the Peloponnesian War / edited by Olga Palagia.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  286pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N5650 .A78 2009 : This book examines the effects of the Peloponnesian War on the arts of Athens and the historical and artistic contexts in which this art was produced. During this period, battle scenes dominated much of the monumental art, while large numbers of memorials to the war dead were erected. The temple of Athena Nike, built to celebrate Athenian victories in the first part of the war, carries a rich sculptural program illustrating military victories. For the first time, the arts in Athens expressed an interest in the afterlife, with many sculptured dedications to Demeter and Kore, who promised initiates special privileges in the underworld. Not surprisingly, there were also dedications to healer gods. After the Sicilian disaster, a retrospective tendency can be noted in both art and politics, which provided reassurance in a time of crisis. Bringing together essays by an international team of art historians and historians, this is the first book to focus on the new themes and new kinds of art introduced in Athens as a result of the thirty-year war.

The art of Euripides : dramatic technique and social context / Donald J. Mastronarde.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  361pp.  Main Library PA3978 .M37 2010 : In this book Professor Mastronarde draws on the seventeen surviving tragedies of Euripides, as well as the fragmentary remains of his lost plays, to explore key topics in the interpretation of the plays. It investigates their relation to the Greek poetic tradition and to the social and political structures of their original setting, aiming both to be attentive to the great variety of the corpus and to identify commonalities across it. In examining such topics as genre, structural strategies, the chorus, the gods, rhetoric, and the portrayal of women and men, this study highlights the ways in which audience responses are manipulated through the use of plot structures and the multiplicity of viewpoints expressed. It argues that the dramas of Euripides, through their dramatic technique, pose a strong challenge to simple formulations of norms, to the reading of consistent human character, and to the quest for certainty and closure.

Artifacts from Ancient Rome / James B. Tschen-Emmons.  Santa Barbara, California : Greenwood, an imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC, [2014]  321pp.  Main Library  DG77 .T75 2014 : When Roman objects and artifacts are properly analyzed, they serve as valuable primary sources for learning about ancient history. This book provides the guidance and relevant historical context students need to see relics as evidence of long-past events and society"

The Artistry of the Homeric Simile / William C. Scott.  Hanover, N.H. : Dartmouth College Library and Dartmouth College Press ; Published by University Press of New England, c2009.  267pp.  Main Library PA4177.S5 S28 2009 : The similes in Homer are treasure troves. They describe scenes of Greek life that are not presented in their simplest form anywhere else: landscapes and seascapes, storms and calm weather, fighting among animals, civic disputes, athletic contests, horse races, community entertainment, women involved in their daily tasks, men running their farms and orchards. These basic paratactic additions to the narrative show how the Greeks found and developed parallels between two scenes--each of which elucidated and interpreted the other--then expressed those scenes in effective poetic language.  In The Artistry of the Homeric Simile, Scott explores the variations and modifications that Homer employs in order to make similes blend expressively with the larger context. This engaging study will help unlock the richness of Homer for the modern reader.

As Witnessed by Images : the Trojan War Tradition in Greek and Etruscan Art / Steven Lowenstam. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.  230pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N8260 .L69 2008 : What informed and inspired the visual artists who depicted the Trojan War on vases, on walls, and in sculpture? Scholars have debated this question for years. Were Greek painters simply depicting the stories of Achilles and Odysseus as recounted in Homer's epics? Or did they work independently, following their own traditions without regard to the Iliad, the Odyssey, and other poetry of their time? ...Steven Lowenstam offers here an alternative theoretical framework, arguing that Greek artists and poets interacted with each other freely, always aware of what the others were producing. As Trojan War myth was the common inheritance of all Greek storytellers, verbal and visual depictions of heroic myth were not created in isolation but were interdependent responses to a centuries-old tradition....As Witnessed by Images investigates visual depictions of Achillean and Odyssean myth from ca. 650-300 BCE and traces the many messages that the stories of Achilles and Odysseus inspired. Lowenstam identifies a variety of images and interpretations -- some regarded Achilles as a hero, others believed him to be a cruel bully -- that reflect and directly respond to the ancient heroic tradition from which the Iliad and Odyssey evolved.

The Athenian Empire / edited by Polly Low.  Edinburgh : Edinburgh University Press, c2008.  352pp.  Main Library DF227 .A84 2008 : Offers a multi-faceted analysis of the history and significance of the Athenian Empire. This book explores possible answers to the crucial questions of the origins and growth of the empire. It deals with the institutions and regulations of empire, and the mechanisms by which it was controlled and the costs and benefits of imperialism.

Athena's Justice : Athena, Athens and the Concept of Justice in Greek Tragedy / Rebecca Futo Kennedy.  New York : Peter Lang, c2009.  169pp.  Main Library PA3131 .K38 2009 : Athena is recognized as an allegory or representative of Athens in most Athenian public art except in tragedy. Perhaps this is because tragedy is rarely studied as a public art form or, perhaps, because her character is not static in tragedy. Although Athena's characterization changes to fit the needs of a particular drama, her clear connection with justice remains true throughout and suggests that she is always the representative of the city and its institutions. Athens, the city Athena protected, experienced a dramatic transformation in the fifth century: its political institutions, physical landscape, military power and international prestige underwent dynamic change. Athena, its goddess and its symbol, simultaneously transformed as well, although not always for the better....Athena's Justice follows the question of civic identity and ideology in Athenian tragedy, focusing specifically on the link between tragedy and its influence upon identity creation and promotion during the period when Athens was asserting itself as an imperial power. Through examination of tragedies in which Athena appears, this book traces the process by which Athens came to identify itself with its legal system, symbolized by Athena on stage, and then suffered the corruption of that system by the exercise of imperial power. Athena's Justice is essential reading not just for classicists and ancient historians, but for anyone interested in the interaction between art and politics and the process by which human beings in any period seek to shape their identity as a people.

Attila the Hun : Barbarian Terror and the Fall of the Roman Empire / Christopher Kelly. London : Bodley Head, 2008.  291pp.  Main Library D141 .K45 2008 : Attila the Hun - godless barbarian and near-mythical warrior king - has become a byword for mindless ferocity. His brutal attacks smashed through the frontiers of the Roman empire in a savage wave of death and destruction. This book goes in search of the real Attila the Hun.  Book review from Heritage Key.

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New Books, B

Barbarian Tides : the Migration Age and the Later Roman Empire / Walter Goffart. Philadelphia, Pa. : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2006.  372pp.  Main Library D135 .G65 2006 : The Migration Age is still envisioned as an onrush of expansionary "Germans" pouring unwanted into the Roman Empire and subjecting it to pressures so great that its western parts collapsed under the weight. Further developing the themes set forth in his classic Barbarians and Romans, Walter Goffart dismantles this grand narrative, shaking the barbarians of late antiquity out of this "Germanic" setting and reimagining the role of foreigners in the Later Roman Empire....The Empire was not swamped by a migratory Germanic flood for the simple reason that there was no single ancient Germanic civilization to be transplanted onto ex-Roman soil. Since the sixteenth century, the belief that purposeful Germans existed in parallel with the Romans has been a fixed point in European history. Goffart uncovers the origins of this historical untruth and argues that any projection of a modern Germany out of an ancient one is illusory. Rather, the multiplicity of northern peoples once living on the edges of the Empire participated with the Romans in the larger stirrings of late antiquity. Most relevant among these was the long militarization that gripped late Roman society concurrently with its Christianization....If the fragmented foreign peoples with which the Empire dealt gave Rome an advantage in maintaining its ascendancy, the readiness to admit military talents of any social origin to positions of leadership opened the door of imperial service to immigrants from beyond its frontiers. Many barbarians were settled in the provinces without dislodging the Roman residents or destabilizing landownership; some were even incorporated into the ruling families of the Empire. The outcome of this process, Goffart argues, was a society headed by elites of soldiers and Christian clergy—one we have come to call medieval.

Bathing in the Roman World / Fikret Yegul.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  256pp.  Main Library GT2846.R66 Y44 2010 : Fikret Yegul examines the social and cultural aspects of one of the key Roman institutions. Guiding the reader through the customs, rituals, and activities associated with public bathing, Yegul traces the origins and development of baths and bathing customs and analyzes the sophisticated technology and architecture of bath complexes, which were among the most imposing of all Roman building types. He also examines the reception of bathing throughout the classical world and the transformation of bathing culture across three continents in Byzantine and Christian societies. The volume concludes with an epilogue on bathing and cleanliness in post-classical Europe, revealing the changes and continuities in culture that have made public bathing a viable phenomenon even in the modern era. Richly illustrated and written in an accessible manner, this book is geared to undergraduates for use in courses on Roman architecture, archaeology, civilization, and social and cultural history.

The Battle of Marathon / Peter Krentz ; foreword by Donald Kagan and Dennis Showalter.  New Haven : Yale University Press, c2010.  230pp.   Main Library  DF225.4 .K74 2010: How did the city-state of Athens defeat the invaders from Persia, the first world empire, on the plain of Marathon in 490 BCE? Clever scholars skeptical of our earliest surviving source, Herodotus, have produced one ingenious theory after another. In this stimulating new book, bound to provoke controversy, Peter Krentz argues that Herodotus was right after all....Beginning his analysis with the Athenians’ first formal contact with the Persians in 507 BCE, Krentz weaves together ancient evidence with travelers’ descriptions, archaeological discoveries, geological surveys, and the experiences of modern reenactors and soldiers to tell his story....Krentz argues that before Marathon the Athenian army fought in a much less organized way than the standard view of the hoplite phalanx suggests: as an irregularly armed mob rather than a disciplined formation of identically equipped infantry. At Marathon the Athenians equipped all their fighters, including archers and horsemen, as hoplites for the first time. Because their equipment weighed only half as much as is usually thought, the Athenians and their Plataean allies could charge almost a mile at a run, as Herodotus says they did. Krentz improves on this account in Herodotus by showing why the Athenians wanted to do such a risky thing.

Becoming Byzantine : Children and Childhood in Byzantium / edited by Arietta Papaconstantinou and Alice-Mary Talbot.  Washington, D.C. : Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection ; [Cambridge, Mass.] : Distributed by Harvard University Press, 2009.  330pp.  Main Library  HQ767.87 .B43 2009 : Despite increased interest over the last fifty years in childhood in Byzantium, the bibliography on this topic remains rather short and generalized. Becoming Byzantine: Children and Childhood in Byzantium presents detailed information about children’s lives, and provides a basis for further study. This collection of eight articles drawn from a May 2006 Dumbarton Oaks symposium covers matters relevant to daily life such as the definition of children in Byzantine law, procreation, death, breastfeeding patterns, and material culture. Religious and political perspectives are also used to examine Byzantine views of the ideal child, and the abuse of children in monasteries. Many of these articles present the first comprehensive accounts of specific aspects of childhood in Byzantium.

Belisarius : the Last Roman General / Ian HughesYardley, Pa. : Westholme, c2009.  272pp.  Main Library DF572.8.B4 H84 2009 : Belisarius (c. 505-565 AD) was the greatest general of the Eastern Roman Empire and is among history's most notable military personalities. At the age of 29, he twice defeated the Persians and reconquered North Africa from the Vandals, before going on to regain the Italian peninsula from the Ostrogoths, including the Eternal City, Rome. Fighting in the name of Justinian I, Belisarius recaptured large portions of the original territory of the ancient Roman Empire. However, Byzantium was both unwilling and incapable of retaining much of Belisarius's hard-won advances, and soon after his death, the empire once again retracted....In Belisarius: The Last Roman General, historian Ian Hughes recounts the life of this great soldier. In addition, he explains the evolution of classical Roman armies and systems of warfare into those of the Byzantine Empire, as well as those of their chief enemies, the Persians, Goths, and Vandals. Based on ancient source and drawing on a wealth of modern research, Belisarius's career is set in the context of the turbulent times in which he lived and his reputation is reassessed to give a balanced portrait of this neglected giant among ancient commanders.

Blood of the Caesars : How the Murder of Germanicus Led to the Fall of Rome / Stephen Dando-Collins.  Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2008.  273pp.  Main Library DG282.5 .D36 2008 : Could the killing of a single great leader while the Roman Empire was still in its infancy have been the root cause of the empire's collapse more than four centuries later? Perhaps, but only if that leader were the grandson of Mark Antony, the adopted son of the emperor Tiberius, handpicked by Augustus to become the third emperor, as well as the father of Caligula and the grandfather of Nero....Germanicus Julius Caesar was all of the above. He was also a brilliant general, a master politician, and the most beloved man in the empire. This brilliant investigation of his death and its aftermath is both a compelling, thought-provoking history and a first-class murder mystery with a plot twist Agatha Christie would envy.

Boudica and Her Stories : narrative Transformations of a Warrior Queen / Carolyn D. Williams. Newark : University of Delaware Press, c2009.  272pp.  Main Library PR153.B63 W56 2009 : Williams  traces the literary history of the British queen who led a rising against Roman occupation about 60 AD. She begins on the historical texts, then looks at Boudica the woman, the campaign, and other aspects. Specific topics include her body, the home life of a warrior queen, sex and gender, British atrocities, pagan and Christian Boudica, and narratives of national identity.

Bound by the City : Greek Tragedy, Sexual Difference, and the Formation of the Polis / edited by Denise Eileen McCoskey, Emily Zakin.  Albany : State University of New York Press, c2009.  344pp.  Main Library PA3136 .B66 2009 : Contents - Introduction / Denise Eileen McCoskey and Emily Zakin -- City farewell! : genos, polis, and gender in Aeschylus' Seven against Thebes and Euripides' Phoenician Women / Peter Burian -- Antigone : the work of literature and the history of subjectivity / Charles Shepherdson -- The Laius complex / Mark Buchan -- Jocasta's Eye and Freud's Uncanny / David Schur -- Sexual difference and the aporia of justice in Sophocles' Antigone / Victoria Wohl -- Tragedy, natural law, and sexual difference in Hegel / Elaine P. Miller -- Marrying the city : intimate strangers and the fury of democracy / Emily Zakin -- Playing the Cassandra : prophecies of the feminine in the Polis and beyond / Pascale-Anne Brault -- The loss of abandonment in Sophocles' Electra / Denise Eileen McCoskey -- Electra in exile / Kirk Ormand -- Orestes and the in-laws / Mark Griffith.

Brill's New Pauly Historical Atlas of the Ancient World.  edited by Anne Wittke, Echhart Olshausen and Richard Szydiak.  Main Library DE5 .N48133 2007 : This new atlas of the ancient world illustrated the political, economic, social, and cultural developments of the ancient Near East, the Mediterranean world, the Byzantine Empire, the Islamic world and Holy Roman Empire from the 3rd millenium BC until the 15 century AD.  The atlas has 170 color maps that document the main historical developments.  Each map is accompanied by a text that outlines the main historical developments.  These texts include bibliographies and 65 additional maps, tables and stemmata that provide further elucidation.

Byzantium : the Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire / Judith Herrin.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2008, c2007.  391pp.  Main Library DF521 .H477 2008 : Byzantium. The name evokes grandeur and exoticism--gold, cunning, and complexity. In this unique book, Judith Herrin unveils the riches of a quite different civilization. Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks. She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art. An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453.

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New Books, C-D

A cabinet of Roman curiosities : strange tales and surprising facts from the world's greatest empire / J. C. McKeown.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.  243pp.  Main Library DG77 .M425 2010 : A Cabinet of Roman Curiosities is a serendipitous collection of odd facts and outlandish opinions, carefully gleaned from the wide body of evidence left to us by the Romans themselves. Each fact or opinion highlights a unique and curious feature of life in ancient Rome. Readers will find a cornucopia of fascinating particulars about Rome, from the fantastical (a description of werewolves) to the quotidian (styles of chamber pots), and from the refined (dining etiquette of Pompeians) to the vulgar (brothel graffiti). Classicist J. C. McKeown has organized the entries around major themes---e.g., The Army, Women, Education, Foreigners, Spectacles, etc.---making the book easily accessible for quick browsing or for more deliberate consumption. Throughout, the purpose of the enterprise is to amuse and to stimulate an interest in the ancient world's most remarkable and abundantly documented civilization.

Caesar : a Life in Western Culture / Maria WykeChicago : The University of Chicago Press, 2008.  287pp.  Main Library DG261 .W95 2008 : More than two millennia have passed since Brutus and his companions murdered Julius Caesar—and inaugurated his legend. Though the assassins succeeded in ending Caesar’s dictatorship, they could never have imagined that his power and influence would only grow after his death, reaching mythic proportions and establishing him as one of the central icons of Western culture, fascinating armchair historians and specialists alike....With Caesar, Maria Wyke takes up the question of just why Julius Caesar has become such an exalted figure when most of his fellow Romans have long been forgotten. Focusing on key events in Caesar’s life, she begins with accounts from ancient sources, then traces the ways in which his legend has been adapted and employed by everyone from Machiavelli to Madison Avenue, Shakespeare to George Bernard Shaw. Napoleon and Mussolini, for example, cited Caesar’s crossing of the Rubicon in defense of their own dictatorial aims, while John Wilkes Booth fancied himself a new Brutus, ridding America of an imperial scourge. Caesar’s personal life, too, has long been fair game—but the lessons we draw from it have changed: Suetonius derided Caesar for his lustfulness and his love of luxury, but these days he and his lover Cleopatra serve as the very embodiment of glamour, enticingly invoked everywhere from Caesars Palace in Las Vegas to the hit HBO series Rome.

Caesar's Calendar : Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History / Denis Feeney.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2007.  372pp.  Main Library CE46 .F44 2007 : The ancient Romans changed more than the map of the world when they conquered so much of it; they altered the way historical time itself is marked and understood. In this brilliant, erudite, and exhilarating book Denis Feeney investigates time and its contours as described by the ancient Romans, first as Rome positioned itself in relation to Greece and then as it exerted its influence as a major world power. Feeney welcomes the reader into a world where time was movable and changeable and where simply ascertaining a date required a complex and often contentious cultural narrative. In a style that is lucid, fluent, and graceful, he investigates the pertinent systems, including the Roman calendar (which is still our calendar) and its near perfect method of capturing the progress of natural time; the annual rhythm of consular government; the plotting of sacred time onto sacred space; the forging of chronological links to the past; and, above all, the experience of empire, by which the Romans meshed the city state's concept of time with those of the foreigners they encountered to establish a new worldwide web of time. Because this web of time was Greek before the Romans transformed it, the book is also a remarkable study in the cross-cultural interaction between the Greek and Roman worlds....Feeney's skillful deployment of specialist material is engaging and accessible and ranges from details of the time schemes used by Greeks and Romans to accommodate the Romans' unprecedented rise to world dominance to an edifying discussion of the fixed axis of B.C./A.D., or B.C.E./C.E., and the supposedly objective "dates" implied. He closely examines the most important of the ancient world's time divisions, that between myth and history, and concludes by demonstrating the impact of the reformed calendar on the way the Romans conceived of time's recurrence. Feeney's achievement is nothing less than the reconstruction of the Roman conception of time, which has the additional effect of transforming the way the way the reader inhabits and experiences time.

The Care of the Dead in Late Antiquity / Éric Rebillard ; translated by Elizabeth Trapnell Rawlings and Jeanine Routier-Pucci. Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2009. 224pp. Main Library BT826 .R4313 2009 : The author's important study of death and burial in late antiquity (originally published in French in 2003 as Religion et sepulture), offers a critical reevaluation of the social role of the dead in early Christian cultures. Rebillard (classics and history, Cornell) revisits familiar discussions of central texts--such as G. B. de Rossi's 1864 assertion that the Church owned and operated churches from the third century--to demonstrate that many assumptions regarding the Church's involvement with burial are based less on solid historical evidence than has long been believed. During late antiquity, Rebillard argues, the Church was in many ways content to allow individuals and families to organize their lives and deaths as they saw fit. In making this work accessible for the first time to English-speaking audiences, Rawlings (independent translator) and Routier-Pucci (Spanish language, Cornell) have done a great service to those in the fields of ancient and medieval history and those interested in the history of death and dying more generally. A bold engagement with questions many scholars have long ceased to ask, this book deserves wide reading and a prominent place on bookshelves across the country.

Carthage must be destroyed : the rise and fall of an ancient civilization / Richard Miles.  New York : Viking, 2011.  520pp.  Main Library DT269.C35 M55 2011 : The devastating struggle to the death between the Carthaginians and the Romans was one of the defining dramas of the ancient world. In an epic series of land and sea battles, both sides came close to victory before the Carthaginians finally succumbed and their capital city, history, and culture were almost utterly erased....Drawing on a wealth of new archaeological research, Richard Miles vividly brings to life this lost empire-from its origins among the Phoenician settlements of Lebanon to its apotheosis as the greatest seapower in the Mediterranean. And at the heart of the history of Carthage lies the extraordinary figure of Hannibal-the scourge of Rome and one of the greatest military leaders, but a man who also unwittingly led his people to catastrophe....The first full-scale history of Carthage in decades, Carthage Must Be Destroyed reintroduces modern readers to the larger-than-life historical players and the ancient glory of this almost forgotten civilization.

Chariton of Aphrodisias and the invention of the Greek love novel / Stefan Tilg.  New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.  343pp.  Main Library  PA3948.C32 T55 2010 : The best known variety of the ancient novel - sometimes identified with the ancient novel tout court - is the Greek love novel. The question of its origins has intrigued scholars for centuries and has been the focus of a great deal of research. Stefan Tilg proposes a new solution to this ancient puzzle by arguing for a personal inventor of the genre, Chariton of Aphrodisias, who wrote the first Greek (and, with that, the first European) love novel, Narratives about Callirhoe, in the mid-first century AD. Tilg's conclusion is drawn on the basis of two converging lines of argument, one from literary history, another from Chariton's poetics, and will shed fresh light upon the reception of Latin literature in the Greek world.

The Christian Parthenon : classicism and pilgrimage in Byzantine Athens / Anthony Kaldellis. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 252pp.  Main Library DF287.P3 K33 2009  : Byzantine Athens was not a city without a history, as is commonly believed, but an important center about which much can now be said. Providing a wealth of new evidence, Professor Kaldellis argues that the Parthenon became a major site of Christian pilgrimage after its conversion into a church. Paradoxically, it was more important as a church than it had been as a temple: the Byzantine period was its true age of glory. He examines the idiosyncratic fusion of pagan and Christian culture that took place in Athens, where an attempt was made to replicate the classical past in Christian terms, affecting rhetoric, monuments, and miracles. He also re-evaluates the reception of ancient ruins in Byzantine Greece and presents for the first time a form of pilgrimage that was directed not toward icons, Holy Lands, or holy men but toward a monument embodying a permanent cultural tension and religious dialectic.

Christian responses to Roman art and architecture : the second-century church amid the spaces of empire / Laura Salah NasrallahCambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  334pp.  Main Library BR163 .N37 2010 :  Laura Nasrallah argues that early Christian literature addressed to Greeks and Romans is best understood when read in tandem with the archaeological remains of Roman antiquity. She examines second-century Christianity by looking at the world in which Christians "lived and moved and had their being." Early Christians were not divorced from the materiality of the world, nor did they always remain distant from the Greek culture of the time or the rhetoric of Roman power. Nasrallah shows how early Christians took up themes of justice, piety, and even the question of whether humans could be gods. They did so in the midst of sculptures that conveyed visually that humans could be gods, monumental architecture that made claims about the justice and piety of the Roman imperial family, and ideas of geography that placed Greek or Roman ethnicity at the center of the known world.

Cicero's Philosophy of History / Matthew Fox.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.  344pp.  Main Library BL790 .C66 2007 : Cicero has long been seen to embody the values of the Roman republic. This provocative study of Cicero's use of history reveals that rather than promoting his own values, Cicero uses historical representation to explore the difficulties of finding any ideological coherence in Rome's political or cultural traditions. Matthew Fox looks to the scepticism of Cicero's philosophical education for an understanding of his perspective on Rome's history, and argues that neglect of the sceptical tradition has transformed the doubting, ambiguous Cicero into the confident proponent of Roman values. Through close reading of a range of his theoretical works, Fox uncovers an ironic attitude towards Roman history, and connects that to the use of irony in mainstream Latin historians. He concludes with a study of a little-known treatise on Cicero from the early eighteenth century which sheds considerable light on the history of Cicero's reception.

Civic rites : democracy and religion in ancient Athens / Nancy Evans.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2010.  272pp.  Main Library JC75.D36 E83 2010 : Civic Rites explores the religious origins of Western democracy by examining the government of fifth-century BCE Athens in the larger context of ancient Greece and the eastern Mediterranean. Deftly combining history, politics, and religion to weave together stories of democracy's first leaders and critics, Nancy Evans gives readers a contemporary's perspective on Athenian society less distorted by modern expectations. She vividly depicts the physical environment and the ancestral rituals that nourished the people of the earliest democratic state, demonstrating how religious concerns were embedded in Athenian governmental processes. The book's lucid portrayals of the best-known Athenian festivals-honoring Athena, Demeter, and Dionysus-offer a balanced view of Athenian ritual and illustrate the range of such customs in fifth-century Athens. Civic Rites shows how, over time, Athenian religious practices reflected fundamental changes to the city itself while giving voice to the peoples' common experience.

The Classical Tradition / Anthony Grafton, Glenn W. Most, Salvatore Settis, editors.   Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2010.  1067pp.  Main Library DE60 .C55 2010 : How do we get from the polis to the police? Or from Odysseus' sirens to an ambulance's? The legacy of ancient Greece and Rome has been imitated, resisted, misunderstood, and reworked by every culture that followed. In this volume, some five hundred articles by a wide range of scholars investigate the afterlife of this rich heritage in the fields of literature, philosophy, art, architecture, history, politics, religion, and science....Arranged alphabetically from Academy to Zoology, the essays—designed and written to serve scholars, students, and the general reader alike—show how the Classical tradition has shaped human endeavors from art to government, mathematics to medicine, drama to urban planning, legal theory to popular culture....At once authoritative and accessible, learned and entertaining, comprehensive and surprising, and accompanied by an extensive selection of illustrations, this guide illuminates the vitality of the Classical tradition that still surrounds us today.

Cleopatra : a biography / Duane W. Roller.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.  252pp.  Main Library DT92.7 .R65 2010 : Few personalities from classical antiquity are more famous--yet more poorly understood--than Cleopatra VII, queen of Egypt. In the centuries since her death in 30 BC, she has been endlessly portrayed in the arts and popular culture, from Shakespearean tragedy to paintings, opera, and movies. Despite the queen's enduring celebrity, however, many have dismissed her as a mere seductress. In this major new biography, Duane Roller reveals that Cleopatra was in fact a learned and visionary leader whose overarching goal was always the preservation of her dynasty and kingdom....Roller's authoritative account is the first to be based solely on primary materials from the Greco-Roman period: literary sources, Egyptian documents (Cleopatra's own writings), and representations in art and coinage produced while she was alive. His compelling portrait of the queen illuminates her prowess as a royal administrator who managed a large and diverse kingdom extending from Asia Minor to the interior of Egypt, as a naval commander who led her own fleet in battle, and as a scholar and supporter of the arts. Even her love affairs with Julius Caesar and Marcus Antonius--the source of her reputation as a supreme seductress who drove men to their doom--were carefully crafted state policies: she chose these partners to insure the procreation of successors who would be worthy of her distinguished dynasty. That Cleopatra ultimately lost to her Roman opponents, Roller contends, in no way diminishes her abilities....This definitive portrait restores the Egyptian queen to her rightful historical status as a potent force in the ancient world--one whose policies and influence long survived her and played a determining role in the future course of the Roman empire.

A Companion to Horace / edited by Gregson Davis.  Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom ; Malden, MA, USA : Blackwell, 2010.  PA6411 .C592 2010  Online :  Few ancient poets have exerted as profound and enduring an influence on European literature as Horace. As a result of the generous patronage of Maecenas, wealthy friend and confidant to the Emperor Augustus, Horace produced a genre-spanning body of Latin literature that ranged from iambus and satire to odes and literary epistle. Reflecting continual and ongoing reassessments of this timeless Roman poet, A Companion to Horace features a thought-provoking collection of newly-commissioned interpretive essays by leading scholars in the field of Latin literature. With its primary focus on the entire generic range of Horace’s monumental literary achievements -- Epodes, Odes, Satires, Carmen Saeculare, Epistles, and Ars Poetica -- some essays also touch upon salient aspects of the reception of a few of his major works in later European literature. Other essays challenge conventional views of the poet's works and influences to expose readers to the most up-to-date perspectives. English translations are provided by the authors for Latin and Greek passages cited in the text, and there are helpful suggestions for further reading about the issues covered in each essay....While casting fresh new light on the interpretation and reception of Horace, A Companion to Horace represents an invaluable contribution to the enduring legacy of one of the greatest poets of the Augustan Age of Latin literature.

A companion to Roman imperialism  / [edited] by Dexter Hoyos.  Boston : Brill, 2013.  393[[/  DG270 .C65 2013  Online : The Roman empire extended over three continents, and all its lands came to share a common culture, bequeathing a legacy vigorous even today. A Companion to Roman Imperialism, written by a distinguished body of scholars, explores the extraordinary phenomenon of Rome’s rise to empire to reveal the impact which this had on her subject peoples and on the Romans themselves. The Companion analyses how Rome’s internal affairs and international relations reacted on each other, sometimes with violent results, why some lands were annexed but others ignored or given up, and the ways in which Rome’s population and power élite evolved as former subjects, east and west, themselves became Romans and made their powerful contributions to Roman history and culture.

A Companion to Vergil's Aeneid and Its Tradition via Blackwell Reference Online / edited by Joseph Farrell and Michael C.J. Putnam.  Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom ; Malden : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.  PA6825 .C64 2010  Online : Presents a collection of original interpretive essays by an international team of renowned scholars. Topics covered include Vergil's handling of sources; the history of Vergil reception in literature; and the enduring influence of Vergilian themes in prose, music, and art. The problem of translating the Aeneid into English and other languages is also covered, along with a survey of more recent translations into non-Western languages and their reception. Thought-provoking and accessible, A Companion to Vergil’s Aeneid and its Tradition draws out wonderful new insights and complexities from the works of a poet whose voice continues to resonate after 2,000 years.  

The Complete Pompeii / Joanne Berry.  London ; New York : Thames & Hudson, c2007.  256pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection DG70.P7 B47 2007 : Pompeii is the best known and probably the most important archaeological site in the world. The drama of its destruction has been handed down to us by Roman writers, its paintings and mosaics have astonished visitors since their discovery in the eighteenth century, and its houses and public buildings present a vivid picture of life and death in a Roman town....With lavish illustrations, numerous box features ranging from theatrical entertainment to water supply, and comprehensive tables of information, The Complete Pompeii is the ultimate resource and inspirational guide to this magnificent ancient site.

The Conquests of Alexander the Great / Waldemar Heckel. New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008. 218pp. Main Library DF234.2 .H37 2008 : In this book, Waldemar Heckel provides a revisionist overview of the conquests of Alexander the Great. Emphasizing the aims and impact of his military expeditions, the political consequences of military action, and the use of propaganda, both for motivation and justification, his underlying premise is that the basic goals of conquest and the keys to military superiority have not changed dramatically over the millennia. Indeed, as Heckel makes clear, many aristocratic and conquest societies are remarkably similar to that of Alexander in their basic aims and organization.

Contemporary Athletics & Ancient Greek Ideals / Daniel A. Dombrowski. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009. 167pp. Main Library GV706 .D65 2009 : Despite their influence in our culture, sports inspire dramatically less philosophical consideration than such ostensibly weightier topics as religion, politics, or science. Arguing that athletic playfulness coexists with serious underpinnings, and that both demand more substantive attention, Daniel Dombrowski harnesses the insights of ancient Greek thinkers to illuminate contemporary athletics....Dombrowski contends that the ideas of Plato, Aristotle, and Plotinus shed important light on issues—such as the pursuit of excellence, the concept of play, and the power of accepting physical limitations while also improving one’s body—that remain just as relevant in our sports-obsessed age as they were in ancient Greece. Bringing these concepts to bear on contemporary concerns, Dombrowski considers such questions as whether athletic competition can be a moral substitute for war, whether it necessarily constitutes war by other means, and whether it encourages fascist tendencies or ethical virtue. The first volume to philosophically explore twenty-first-century sport in the context of its ancient predecessor, Contemporary Athletics and Ancient Greek Ideals reveals that their relationship has great and previously untapped potential to inform our understanding of human nature.

Contested Triumphs : Politics, Pageantry, and Performance in Livy's Republican Rome / Miriam R. Pelikan Pittenger.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008.  365pp.  Main Library DG241.2 .P58 2008 : This pathbreaking analysis of Roman political culture in the middle Republic focuses on the concerns of the Roman Senate as it decided whether or not to award a victorious general triumphal honors. Miriam R. Pelikan Pittenger's strikingly original approach illuminates this process by examining several Senate debates as reported by the historian Livy. The conduct of these debates illustrates the competitive ethos in the elite and mirrors creative tensions between the magistrates, the Senate, and the people of Rome. Contested Triumphs shows how Livy dramatized the process of history in the making and vividly demonstrates how it is the struggle itself that remains most vital.

Controlling Desires : Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome / Kirk Ormand.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2009.  292pp.  Main Library HQ13 .O76 2009 : Historians of ancient Greece and Rome are sometimes hesitant to engage with the well-documented fact that Greek and Roman men regularly engaged in same-sex sexual relations with younger men. In a similar vein, in order to avoid her apparent sexual orientation, scholars have constructed elaborate social explanations for Sappho, a 6th-century woman from the island of Lesbos who wrote passionate poetry about her erotic relations with a number of women. On the other hand, in recent times the Greeks and Romans have occasionally been idealized as prototypes of modem homosexuality or bisexuality....In this engaging, cross-disciplinary book, Ormand argues that the Greeks and Romans thought of sex and sexuality in ways fundamentally different from our own. Ormand's exploration of Greek and Roman sexual practice affords readers the opportunity to see how attitudes and beliefs about sex and sexuality functioned in the early civilizations of the West, and how those attitudes reveal the unspoken rules that defined public and private behavior....Ormand treats Greece and Rome in separate sections, with ample cross-references and comparisons. Within each section, individual chapters focus on different types of texts and visual arts. Just as sexuality is presented differently in our legal cases than it is on television sitcoms, or supermarket tabloids, the reader will naturally find that the Greeks and Romans talk one way about sex, love, and marriage in legal speeches and another way in comedies, satires, and philosophical texts. Ormand's analysis takes into account changes in attitude over time, as well as different modes of presenting a complex and interconnected set of social beliefs and behaviors.

Critical Moments in Classical Literature : Studies in the Ancient View of Literature and Its Uses / Richard L. Hunter. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 217pp. Main Library PA3079 .H86 2009 : Through a series of innovative critical readings Richard Hunter builds a picture of how the ancients discussed the meaning of literary works and their importance in society. He pays particular attention to the interplay of criticism and creativity by not treating criticism in isolation from the works which the critics discussed. Attention is given both to the development of a history of criticism, as far as our sources allow, and to the constant recurrence of similar themes across the centuries. At the head of the book stands the contest of Aeschylus and Euripides in Aristophanes' Frogs which foreshadows more of the subsequent critical tradition than is often realised. Other chapters are devoted to ancient reflection on Greek and Roman comedy, to the Augustan critic Dionysius of Halicarnassus, to 'Longinus', On the Sublime, and to Plutarch. All Greek and Latin is translated.

Daphnis and Chloe / Longus. Anthia and Habrocomes / Xenophon, of Ephesus ; edited and translated by Jeffrey Henderson.  Cambridge, Mass. ; London : Harvard University Press, 2009.  370pp.  Main Library PA4229 .L7 2009 : In Longus’s ravishing Daphnis and Chloe (second or early third century CE), one of the great works of world literature, an innocent boy and girl gradually discover their sexuality in an idealized pastoral environment. In Xenophon’s Anthia and Habrocomes (first century CE), perhaps the earliest extant novel and a new addition to the Loeb Classical Library, a newlywed couple, separated by mischance, survive hair-raising adventures and desperate escapes as they traverse the Mediterranean and the Near East en route to a joyful reunion. The pairing of these two novels well illustrates both the basic conventions of the genre and its creative range....This new edition offers fresh translations and texts by Jeffrey Henderson, based on the recent critical editions of Longus by M. D. Reeve and Xenophon by J. N. O’Sullivan.

Daughters of Gaia : Women in the Ancient Mediterranean World / Bella Vivante.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger Publishers, 2007.  230pp.  Main Library Main Library HQ1127 .V56 2007 : From their personal lives at home to their roles in the realms of religion, health, economics, governance, war, philosophy, and poetry, this is the story of ancient women in all their aspects. Vivante explores women's lives in four ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean: Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome. While the experiences of women in ancient cultures were certainly very different from those of most women today, a tendency to focus too much on negative or restrictive images has until now provided readers with a rather incomplete picture. Looking at this important era from a female-oriented perspective, Vivante widens the perceptual lens and makes it possible to highlight the fundamental empowered aspects of women's activities in order to present them in balance with the various limits imposed on their societal participation.

The Death and Afterlife of Achilles / Jonathan S. Burgess. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009. 184pp. Main Library PA4037 .B83 2009 : Achilles' death -- by an arrow shot through the vulnerable heel of the otherwise invincible mythic hero -- was as well known in antiquity as the rest of the history of the Trojan War. However, this important event was not described directly in either of the great Homeric epics, the Iliad or the Odyssey. Noted classics scholar Jonathan S. Burgess traces the story of Achilles as represented in other ancient sources in order to offer a deeper understanding of the death and afterlife of the celebrated Greek warrior....Through close readings of additional literary sources and analysis of ancient artwork, such as vase paintings, Burgess uncovers rich accounts of Achilles' death as well as alternative versions of his afterlife. Taking a neoanalytical approach, Burgess is able to trace the influence of these parallel cultural sources on Homer's composition of the Iliad. ...With his keen, original analysis of hitherto untapped literary, iconographical, and archaeological sources, Burgess adds greatly to our understanding of this archetypal mythic hero.

Death in Ancient Rome / Catharine Edwards. New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c2007. 287pp. Main Library HQ1073.5.R66 E38 2007 : For the Romans, the manner of a person’s death was the most telling indication of their true character. Death revealed the true patriot, the genuine philosopher, even, perhaps, the great artist—and certainly the faithful Christian. Catharine Edwards draws on the many and richly varied accounts of death in the writings of Roman historians, poets, and philosophers, including Cicero, Lucretius, Virgil, Seneca, Petronius, Tacitus, Tertullian, and Augustine, to investigate the complex significance of dying in the Roman world. Death in the Roman world was largely understood and often literally viewed as a spectacle. Those deaths that figured in recorded history were almost invariably violent—murders, executions, suicides—and yet the most admired figures met their ends with exemplary calm, their last words set down for posterity. From noble deaths in civil war, mortal combat between gladiators, political execution and suicide, to the deathly dinner of Domitian, the harrowing deaths of women such as the mythical Lucretia and Nero’s mother Agrippina, as well as instances of Christian martyrdom, Edwards engagingly explores the culture of death in Roman literature and history.

The Deaths of Seneca / James Ker. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2009. 413pp. Main Library PA6675 .K47 2009 : The forced suicide of Seneca, former adviser to Nero, is one of the most tortured -- and most revisited -- death scenes from classical antiquity. After fruitlessly opening his veins and drinking hemlock, Seneca finally succumbed to death in a stifling steam bath, while his wife Paulina, who had attempted suicide as well, was bandaged up and revived by Nero's men. From the first century to the present day, writers and artists have retold this scene in order to rehearse and revise Seneca's image and writings, and to scrutinize the event of human death. In The Deaths of Seneca, James Ker offers the first comprehensive cultural history of Seneca's death scene, situating it in the Roman imagination and tracing its many subsequent interpretations. Ker shows first how the earliest accounts of the death scene by Tacitus and others were shaped by conventions of Greco-Roman exitus-description and Julio-Claudian dynastic history. At the book's center is an exploration of Seneca's own prolific writings about death -- whether anticipating death in his letters, dramatizing it in the tragedies, or offering therapy for loss in the form of consolations -- which offered the primary lens through which Seneca's contemporaries would view the author's death. These ancient approaches set the stage for prolific receptions, and Ker traces how the death scene was retold in both literary and visual versions, from St. Jerome to Heiner Muller and from medieval illuminations to Peter Paul Rubens and Jacques-Louis David. Dozens of interpreters, engaging with prior versions and with Seneca's writings, forged new and sometimes controversial views on Seneca's legacy and, more broadly, on mortality and suicide. The Deaths of Seneca presents a new, historically inclusive, approach to reading this major Roman author.

The Defeat of Rome in the East : Crassus, the Parthians, and the Disastrous Battle of Carrhae, 53 BC / by Gareth C. Sampson.  Philadelphia, [PA] : Casemate, 2008.  224pp.  Main Library DG260.C73 S36 2008 : During the last stages of the Republic, Rome suffered its greatest military disaster since Hannibal's invasion of Italy over 150 years earlier, though this defeat had more far-reaching consequences. While Rome was able to recover from its disaster at Cannae, it never did retrieve the results of Carrhae, a defeat that sealed the East as an impenetrable barrier to Roman ambition, and also signaled the demise of the Republic....In 53 BC, Marcus Crassus, the richest member of Rome's ruling Triumvirate, which also included Caesar and Pompey, decided to enhance his military stature with an invasion of the Parthian Empire centered on Mesopotamia (today's Iraq). His 36,000 legionaries crossed the Euphrates and were met by a much smaller Parthian army, albeit one mounted on horseback in the dispersed, missile-firing steppe-war tradition....In the desolate territory around Carrhae the Roman legions were surrounded and beset by elusive horse warriors, who alternated deadly arrow-fire from recurved bows with devastating attacks by armored horsemen, wielding lances in the fashion of future European knights. At one point Crassus dispatched his son with the Roman cavalry and light infantry to break a hole through the deadly ring. The Parthians concentrated on the party and destroyed it. Crassus was just about to move with the main body to its aid when Parthian horsemen rode up wielding his son's head on the tip of a spear....Severely unnerved, Crassus ordered a retreat, the Parthians moving in to massacre the 4,000 wounded he left behind. The next day, called to a parlay he was forced to attend by his nearly mutinous soldiers, Crassus and his officers were murdered by the Parthians. The now-leaderless Roman army disintegrated, only some 6,000 able to escape. At least 20,000 Roman legionaries were dead on the field, with 10,000 more captured....In this book, Dr. Gareth Sampson, currently a tutor in ancient history at the University of Manchester, lays out the gruesome outcome of the battle and its consequences. First, unlike Alexander's Greeks, who had marched all the way to the Indus, Rome was never again to challenge the civilizations beyond the Euphrates. Second, with Crasus dead, Caesar and Pompey engaged in a bloody civil war that would end the Republic and result in political dictatorship....The author also provides an analysis of the mysterious Parthians, a people who vied with Rome as the most powerful empire on earth. Though their polity and records have long since disappeared, the Parthians' mark on history is clear enough through their decisive victory over Rome at Carrhae.

Delphi and Olympia : the spatial politics of panhellenism in the archaic and classical periods / Michael Scott.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010. 356pp. Main Library DF261.D35 S35 2010 : Most people think about the sanctuary of Delphi as the seat of the famous oracle and of Olympia as the site of the Olympic games. The oracle and the games, however, were but two of the many activities ongoing at both sites. This book investigates the physical remains of both sanctuaries to show how different visitors interacted with the sacred spaces of Delphi and Olympia in an important variety of ways during the archaic and classical periods. It examines how this fluid usage impacted upon, and was itself affected by, the development of the sanctuary space and how such usage influenced the place and relationship of these two sites in the wider landscape. As a result, this book argues for the re-evaluation of the panhellenic roles of Delphi and Olympia in the Greek world and for a rethinking of the meaning and usefulness of the term `panhellenism' in Greek politics, religion and culture.

The Derveni Krater : Masterpiece of Classical Greek Metalwork / by Beryl Barr-Sharrar. Princeton : American School of Classical Studies at Athens, c2008. 239pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NK8000 .B37 2008 : This beautifully illustrated book represents the first full publication of the most elaborate metal vessel from the ancient world yet discovered. Found in an undisturbed Macedonian tomb of the late 4th century B.C., the volute krater is a tour de force of highly sophisticated methods of bronze working. An unusual program of iconography informs every area of the vessel. Snakes with copper and silver inlaid stripes frame the rising handles, wrapping their bodies around masks of underworld deities. On the shoulder sit four cast bronze figures: on one side a youthful Dionysos with an exhausted maenad, on the other a sleeping Silenos and a maenad handling a snake. In the major repousse frieze on the body a bearded hunter is associated with Dionysian figures. What was the function of this extraordinary object? And what is the meaning of the intricate iconography? The krater is placed in its Macedonian archaeological context as an heirloom of the descendants of the man named in the Thessalian inscription on its rim, and in its art historical context as a highly elaborated, early 4th-century, version of a metal type known in Athens by about 470 B.C.

Dining as a Roman emperor : how to cook ancient Roman recipes today / Eugenia Salza Prina Ricotti.  Roma : "L'Erma" di Bretschneider, 1995.   117pp.  Main Library TX725.R57 S25 1995 : Both an archaeologist and a great cook, Eugenia Salza Prina Ricotti has drawn from the archaeological findings of ancient Roman towns, especially Pompeii, and from the literary texts that talk about recipes and ingredients, instructions for how to cook a typical Roman meal today.

Dining Posture in Ancient Rome : Bodies, Values, and Status / Matthew B. Roller.  Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006.  219pp.  Main Library DG101 .R65 2006 : What was really going on at Roman banquets? In this lively new book, veteran Romanist Matthew Roller looks at a little-explored feature of Roman culture: dining posture. In ancient Rome, where dining was an indicator of social position as well as an extended social occasion, dining posture offered a telling window into the day-to-day lives of the city's inhabitants....This book investigates the meaning and importance of the three principal dining postures—reclining, sitting, and standing—in the period 200 B.C.-200 A.D. It explores the social values and distinctions associated with each of the postures and with the diners who assumed them. Roller shows that dining posture was entangled with a variety of pressing social issues, such as gender roles and relations, sexual values, rites of passage, and distinctions among the slave, freed, and freeborn conditions....Timely in light of the recent upsurge of interest in Roman dining, this book is equally concerned with the history of the body and of bodily practices in social contexts. Roller gathers evidence for these practices and their associated values not only from elite literary texts, but also from subelite visual representations—specifically, funerary monuments from the city of Rome and wall paintings of dining scenes from Pompeii....Engagingly written, Dining Posture in Ancient Rome will appeal not only to the classics scholar, but also to anyone interested in how life was lived in the Eternal City.

Divine Qualities : Cult and Community in Republican Rome / Anna J. Clark.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.  376pp.  Main Library BL803 .C53 2007 : This book explores an aspect of how Romans thought about themselves. Its subject is 'divine qualities': qualities like Concord, Faith, Hope, Clemency, Fortune, Freedom, Piety, and Victory, which received public cult in Rome in the Republican period. Anna Clark draws on a wide range of evidence (literature, drama, coins, architecture, inscriptions and graffiti) to show that these qualities were not simply given cult because they were intrinsically important to 'Romans'. They rather became 'Roman' through claims, counter-claims, appropriations and explorations of them by different individuals. The resources brought into existence by cult (temples, altars, coin images, statues, passwords, votive inscriptions) were visible and accessible to a broad range of people. Divine qualities were relevant to a broader social spectrum than is usually recognized, and this has important consequences for our understanding of Roman society.

Dreams and experience in classical antiquity / William V. Harris.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2009.  332pp.  Main Library BF1078 .H2955 2009 : From the Iliad to Aristophanes, from the gospel of Matthew to Augustine, Greek and Latin texts are constellated with descriptive images of dreams. Some are formulaic, others intensely vivid. The best ancient minds—Plato, Aristotle, the physician Galen, and others—struggled to understand the meaning of dreams....With Dreams and Experience in Classical Antiquity the renowned ancient historian William Harris turns his attention to oneiric matters. This cultural history of dreams in antiquity draws on both contemporary post-Freudian science and careful critiques of the ancient texts. Harris traces the history of characteristic forms of dream-­description and relates them both to the ancient experience of dreaming and to literary and religious imperatives. He analyzes the nuances of Greek and Roman belief in the truth-telling potential of dreams, and in a final chapter offers an assessment of ancient attempts to understand dreams naturalistically....How did dreaming culture evolve from Homer’s time to late antiquity? What did these dreams signify? And how do we read and understand ancient dreams through modern eyes? Harris takes an elusive subject and writes about it with rigor and precision, reminding us of specificities, contexts, and changing attitudes through history....Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out. If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out.  If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

New Books, E-G

The Economy of the Greek Cities : From the Archaic Period to the Early Roman Empire / Léopold Migeotte ; translated by Janet Lloyd.  Berkeley : University of California, c2009.  200pp.  Main Library HC37 .M5413 2009 : Offers students and interested general readers a basic, clear, and concise overview of ancient Greek economies from the archaic to the Roman periods. Léopold Migeotte's useful analysis of Greek economic activities approaches them from the perspective of the ancient sources, situating them, as well as attitudes related to them, within the context of the city-state (polis). Migeotte illuminates the ways citizens in which intervened in the economy and considers such important sectors as agriculture, craft industries, public works, and trade. Focusing particular attention on how the private and public spheres impinged on each other, this book provides a broad and accessible understanding of the political and economic changes that affected life in the Greek city-states over a thousand-year period

Electra USA : American Stagings of Sophocles' Tragedy / E. Teresa Choate.  Madison : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2009.  292pp.  Main Library PA4413.E5 C48 2009 : Contents - Introduction : the myth, the tragedy, and modern critical opinion -- Production histories, 1889-1937 -- Production histories, 1964-1995 -- Electra on a pedestal -- Electra down in the dirt -- Clytemnestra, queen of vengence -- Chrysothemis, the good girl -- The chorus.

The Emperor Elagabalus : fact or fiction? / Leonardo de Arrizabalaga y Prado.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  381pp.  Main Library DG303 .A77 2010 : The third-century adolescent Roman emperor miscalled Elagabalus or Heliogabalus was made into myth shortly after his murder. For 1800 years since, scandalous stories relate his alleged depravity, debauchery and bloodthirsty fanaticism as High Priest of a Syrian Sun God. From these, one cannot discern anything demonstrably true about the boy or his reign. This book, drawing on the author's detailed research and publications, investigates what can truly be known about this emperor. Through careful analysis of all sources, including historiography, coins, inscriptions, papyri, sculpture and topography, it shows that there are things of which we can be sure, and others that are likely. Through these we can reassess his reign. We discover a youth, thrust by his handlers into power on false pretences, who creates his own more authentic persona as priest-emperor, but loses the struggle for survival against rivals in his family, who justify his murder with his myth.

Empires and Barbarians : the Fall of Rome and the Birth of Europe / Peter Heather.  New York : Oxford University Press, 2010.  734pp.  Main Library D135 .H436 2010 : Here is a fresh, provocative look at how a recognizable Europe came into being in the first millennium AD. With sharp analytic insight, Peter Heather explores the dynamics of migration and social and economic interaction that changed two vastly different worlds--the undeveloped barbarian world and the sophisticated Roman Empire--into remarkably similar societies and states....The book's vivid narrative begins at the time of Christ, when the Mediterranean circle, newly united under the Romans, hosted a politically sophisticated, economically advanced, and culturally developed civilization--one with philosophy, banking, professional armies, literature, stunning architecture, even garbage collection. The rest of Europe, meanwhile, was home to subsistence farmers living in small groups, dominated largely by Germanic speakers. Although having some iron tools and weapons, these mostly illiterate peoples worked mainly in wood and never built in stone. The farther east one went, the simpler it became: fewer iron tools and ever less productive economies. And yet ten centuries later, from the Atlantic to the Urals, the European world had turned. Slavic speakers had largely superseded Germanic speakers in central and Eastern Europe, literacy was growing, Christianity had spread, and most fundamentally, Mediterranean supremacy was broken. The emergence of larger and stronger states in the north and east had, by the year 1000, brought patterns of human organization into much greater homogeneity across the continent. Barbarian Europe was barbarian no longer....Bringing the whole of first millennium European history together for the first time, and challenging current arguments that migration played but a tiny role in this unfolding narrative, Empires and Barbarians views the destruction of the ancient world order in the light of modern migration and globalization patterns. The result is a compelling, nuanced, and integrated view of how the foundations of modern Europe were laid.

The End of Empire : Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome / Christopher Kelly.  New York : W.W. Norton & Co., 2009.  350pp.  Main Library D141 .K45 2009  : Conjuring up images of savagery and ferocity, Attila the Hun has become a byword for barbarianism. But, as the Romans of the fifth century knew, Attila did more than just terrorize villages on the edge of an empire. Drawing on original texts, this riveting narrative follows Attila and the Huns from the steppes of Kazakhstan to the opulent city of Constantinople and the Great Hungarian Plain, uncovering an unlikely marriage proposal, a long-standing relationship with a treacherously ambitious Roman general, and a thwarted Roman assassination plot. Attila the Hun and the Fall of Rome reframes the warrior king as a political strategist, capturing the story of how a small, but dedicated, opponent dealt a seemingly invincible empire defeats from which it would never recover.

Everyday writing in the Graeco-Roman East / Roger S. Bagnall.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2011. 179pp.  Main Library P211.3.E3 B34 2011 : Most of the everyday writing from the ancient world -- that is, informal writing not intended for a long life or wide public distribution -- has perished. Reinterpreting the silences and blanks of the historical record, leading papyrologist Roger S. Bagnall convincingly argues that ordinary people -- from Britain to Egypt to Afghanistan -- used writing in their daily lives far more extensively than has been recognized. Marshalling new and little-known evidence, including remarkable graffiti recently discovered in Smyrna, Bagnall presents a fascinating analysis of writing in different segments of society. His book offers a new picture of literacy in the ancient world in which Aramaic rivals Greek and Latin as a great international language, and in which many other local languages develop means of written expression alongside these metropolitan tongues

The Extraordinary Voyage of Pytheas the Greek / Barry Cunliffe. New York, N.Y. : Penguin Books, 2003. 195pp.  Main Library G88 .C86 2003 : Around 330 B.C., a remarkable adventurer named Pytheas set out from the Greek colony of Massalia (now Marseille) on the Mediterranean Sea to explore the fabled, terrifying lands of northern Europe. Renowned archaeologist Barry Cunliffe here re-creates Pytheas's unprecedented journey, which occurred almost 300 years before Julius Caesar landed in Britain. Beginning with an invaluable pocket history of early Mediterranean civilization, Cunliffe illuminates what Pytheas would have seen and experienced-the route he likely took to reach Brittany, then Britain, Iceland, and Denmark; and evidence of the ancient cultures he would have encountered on shore. The discoveries Pytheas made would reverberate throughout the civilized world for years to come, and in recounting his extraordinary voyage, Cunliffe chronicles an essential chapter in the history of civilization.

The Fall of the Roman Household / Kate Cooper.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.  319pp.  Main Library HQ511 .C66 2007 : Edward Gibbon laid the fall of the Roman Empire at Christianity's door, suggesting that 'pusillanimous youth preferred the penance of the monastic to the dangers of a military life ... whole legions were buried in these religious sanctuaries'. This surprising study suggests that, far from seeing Christianity as the cause of the fall of the Roman Empire, we should understand the Christianisation of the household as a central Roman survival strategy. By establishing new 'ground rules' for marriage and family life, the Roman Christians of the last century of the Western empire found a way to re-invent the Roman family as a social institution to weather the political, military, and social upheaval of two centuries of invasion and civil war. In doing so, these men and women - both clergy and lay - found themselves changing both what it meant to be Roman, and what it meant to be Christian. 

The Fall of the West : The Slow Death of the Roman Superpower / Adrian Goldsworthy. London : Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2009. 531pp. Main Library DG311 .G67 2009 : The Fall of the Roman Empire has been a best-selling subject since the 18th century. Since then over 200 discrete reasons have been advanced for the collapse of the western half of the Roman empire. Until very recently, the academic view downplayed the death and destruction, to spin a positive story of the 'world of late antiquity'. Barbarian invasions are described in neutral language: the movement of peoples. It is all painfully 'politically correct'. Now Adrian Goldsworthy comes forward with his trademark combination of clear narrative, common sense, and a thorough mastery of the sources. In telling the story from beginning to end, he rescues the era from the mealy-mouthed and diffident: this is a red-blooded account of barbarian invasions, palace coups, scheming courtiers and corrupt emperors who set the gold standard for dissipation. It is 'old fashioned history' in the best sense: an accessible narrative with colourful characters whose story reveals the true reasons for the fall of Rome.

Family Fictions in Roman Art / Natalie Boymel Kampen. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  208pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N7588 .K35 2009 : In Family Fictions in Roman Art, Natalie Kampen reveals the profoundly de-naturalized ways in which family could be represented in the interests of political power during the Roman Empire. Her study examines a group of splendid objects made over the course of six hundred years, from carved gems to triumphal arches to ivory plaques, and asks how and why artists and their elite patrons chose to depict family to speak of everything from gender to the nature of rulership, from social rank to relationship itself. In the process, artists found new and often strikingly odd ways to give form to families from conquered lands and provinces as well as from the Italian countryside and the court. The book’s contribution is in its combination of close attention to the creativity of Roman art and interest in the visual language of social and political relationships in a great Empire.

The female portrait statue in the Greek world / Sheila Dillon.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  254pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NB1296.3 .D56 2010 : In this book, Sheila Dillon offers the first detailed analysis of the female portrait statue in the Greek world from the 4th century BCE to the 3rd century CE. A major component of Greek sculptural production, particularly in the Hellenistic period, female portrait statues are mostly missing from our histories of Greek portraiture. Whereas male portraits tend to stress their subject's distinctiveness through physiognomic individuality, portraits of women are more idealized and visually homogeneous. In defining their subjects according to normative ideals of beauty rather than notions of corporeal individuality, Dillon argues that Greek portraits of women work differently than those of men and must be approached with different expectations. She examines the historical phenomenon of the commemoration of women in portrait statues and explores what these statues can tell us about Greek attitudes toward the public display of the female body.

The Fires of Vesuvius : Pompeii Lost and Found / Mary Beard. Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2008. 360pp. Main Library DG70.P7 B43 2008 : Pompeii is the most famous archaeological site in the world, visited by more than two million people each year. Yet it is also one of the most puzzling, with an intriguing and sometimes violent history, from the sixth century BCE to the present day....Destroyed by Vesuvius in 79 CE, the ruins of Pompeii offer the best evidence we have of life in the Roman Empire. But the eruptions are only part of the story. In The Fires of Vesuvius, acclaimed historian Mary Beard makes sense of the remains. She explores what kind of town it was—more like Calcutta or the Costa del Sol?—and what it can tell us about “ordinary” life there. From sex to politics, food to religion, slavery to literacy, Beard offers us the big picture even as she takes us close enough to the past to smell the bad breath and see the intestinal tapeworms of the inhabitants of the lost city. She resurrects the Temple of Isis as a testament to ancient multiculturalism. At the Suburban Baths we go from communal bathing to hygiene to erotica....Recently, Pompeii has been a focus of pleasure and loss: from Pink Floyd’s memorable rock concert to Primo Levi’s elegy on the victims. But Pompeii still does not give up its secrets quite as easily as it may seem. This book shows us how much more and less there is to Pompeii than a city frozen in time as it went about its business on 24 August 79.

Funeral Oration / Hyperides ; edited with introduction, translation, and commentary by Judson Herrman. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 148pp. Main Library PA4212 .A36 2009 : Hyperides' Funeral Oration is arguably the most important surviving example of the genre from classical Greece. The speech stands apart from other funeral orations (epitaphioi) in a few key respects. First, we have the actual text as it was delivered in Athens (the other speeches, with the possible expection of Demosthenes 60, are literary compositions). Next, in contrast to other orations that look to the past and make only the vaguest mention of recent events, Hyperides' speech is a valuable source for the military history of the Lamian War as it captures the optimistic mood in Athens after Alexander's death. Finally, the speech has been singled out since Longinus' time for its poetic effects....This volume is a new critical edition and commentary of the speech, written for scholars and graduate students in classics and ancient history. Although Hyperides ranked nearly as high as Demosthenes in the canon of Attic orators and his funeral oration will make the speech much more accessible to a wide range of scholars. The text is based on a full examination of the papyrus and includes an apparatus criticus, with a complete listing of all conjectures in a separate appendix. The translation is clear and accurate and the commentary provides a mixture of historical, cultural, and literary material.

Funny Words in Plautine Comedy / Michael Fontaine. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 311pp. Main Library PA6602 .F66 2009 : Plautus, Rome's earliest extant poet, was acclaimed by ancient critics above all for his mastery of language and his felicitous jokes; and yet in modern times relatively little attention has been devoted to elucidating these elements fully. In Funny Words in Plautine Comedy, Michael Fontaine reassesses some of the premises and nature of Plautus' comedies. Mixing textual and literary criticism, Fontaine argues that many of Plautus' jokes and puns were misunderstood already in antiquity, and that with them the names and identities of some familiar characters were misconceived. Central to his study are issues of Plautine language, style, psychology, coherence of characterization, and irony. By examining the comedian's tendency to make up and misuse words, Fontaine sheds new light on the close connection between Greek and Roman comedy. Considerable attention is also paid to Plautus' audience and to the visual elements in his plays. The result is a reappraisal that will challenge many received views of Plautus, positioning him as a poet writing in the Hellenistic tradition for a knowledgeable and sophisticated audience. All quotations from Latin, Greek, and other foreign languages are translated. Extensive indices, including a "pundex," facilitate ease of reference among the many jokes and plays on words discussed in the text.

Ghost on the throne : the death of Alexander the Great and the war for crown and empire / James Romm.  New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2011  341pp. Main Library DF235.4 .R66 2011 : Alexander the Great, perhaps the most commanding leader in history, united his empire and his army by the titanic force of his will. His death at the age of thirty-two spelled the end of that unity. The story of Alexander's conquest of the Persian empire is known to many readers, but the dramatic and consequential saga of the empire's collapse remains virtually untold. It is a tale of loss that begins with the greatest loss of all, the death of the Macedonian king who had held the empire together. With his demise, it was as if the sun had disappeared from the solar system, as if planets and moons began to spin crazily in new directions, crashing into one another with unimaginable force. Alexander bequeathed his power, legend has it, "to the strongest," leaving behind a mentally damaged half brother and a posthumously born son as his only heirs. In a strange compromise, both figures--Philip III and Alexander IV--were elevated to the kingship, quickly becoming prizes, pawns, fought over by a half-dozen Macedonian generals. Each successor could confer legitimacy on whichever general controlled him. At the book's center is the monarch's most vigorous defender; Alexander's former Greek secretary, now transformed into a general himself. He was a man both fascinating and entertaining, a man full of tricks and connivances, like the enthroned ghost of Alexander that gives the book its title, and becomes the determining factor in the precarious fortunes of the royal family. James Romm, brilliant classicist and storyteller, tells the galvanizing saga of the men who followed Alexander and found themselves incapable of preserving his empire. The result was the undoing of a world, formerly united in a single empire, now ripped apart into a nightmare of warring nation-states struggling for domination, the template of our own times.

The ghosts of Cannae : Hannibal and the darkest hour of the Roman republic / Robert L. O'Connell.  New York : Random House, c2010.  310pp.  Main Library DG247.3 .O25 2010 : A stirring account of the most influential battle in history....For millennia, Carthage’s triumph over Rome at Cannae in 216 B.C. has inspired reverence and awe. It was the battle that countless armies tried to imitate, most notably in World Wars I and II, the battle that obsessed legendary military minds. Yet no general ever matched Hannibal’s most unexpected, innovative, and brutal military victory—the costliest day of combat for any army in history. Robert L. O’Connell, one of the most admired names in military history, now tells the whole story of Cannae for the first time, giving us a stirring account of this apocalyptic battle of the Second Punic War, and its causes and consequences....O’Connell shows how a restive Rome amassed a giant army to punish Carthage’s masterful commander, who had dealt them deadly blows at Trebia and Lake Trasimene, and how Hannibal outwitted enemies that outnumbered him. O’Connell describes Hannibal’s strategy of blinding his opponents with sun and dust, enveloping them in a deadly embrace and sealing their escape, before launching a massive knife fight that would kill 48,000 men in close contact. The Ghosts of Cannae then brilliantly conveys how this disastrous pivot point in Rome’s history ultimately led to the republic’s resurgence and the creation of its empire....Piecing together decayed shreds of ancient reportage, the author paints powerful portraits of the leading players: Hannibal, resolutely sane and uncannily strategic; Varro, Rome’s co-consul who was so scapegoated for the loss; and Scipio Africanus, the surviving (and self-promoting) Roman military tribune who would one day pay back Hannibal at Zama in North Africa. Finally, O’Connell reveals how Cannae’s legend has inspired and haunted military leaders ever since, and the lessons it teaches for our own wars.

Gods and Goddesses in the Garden : Greco-Roman Mythology and The Scientific Names of Plants / Peter Bernhardt.  New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, c2008.  239pp.  Main Library QK96 .B27 2008 : Zeus, Medusa, Hercules, Aphrodite. Did you know that these and other dynamic deities, heroes, and monsters of Greek and Roman mythology live on in the names of trees and flowers? Some grow in your local woodlands or right in your own backyard garden. In this delightful book, botanist Peter Bernhardt reveals the rich history and mythology that underlie the origins of many scientific plant names. Unlike other books about botanical taxonomy that take the form of heavy and intimidating lexicons, Bernhardt's account comes together in a series of interlocking stories. Each chapter opens with a short version of a classical myth, then links the tale to plant names, showing how each plant "resembles" its mythological counterpart with regard to its history, anatomy, life cycle, and conservation. You will learn, for example, that as our garden acanthus wears nasty spines along its leaf margins, it is named for the nymph who scratched the face of Apollo. The shape-shifting god, Proteus, gives his name to a whole family of shrubs and trees that produce colorful flowering branches in an astonishing number of sizes and shapes. Amateur and professional gardeners, high school teachers and professors of biology, botanists and conservationists alike will appreciate this book's entertaining and informative entry to the otherwise daunting field of botanical names. Engaging, witty, and memorable, Gods and Goddesses in the Garden transcends the genre of natural history and makes taxonomy a topic equally at home in the classroom and at cocktail parties.

Great Battles of the Hellenistic World / Joseph Pietrykowski. Barnsley, South Yorkshire [England] : Pen & Sword Military, 2009. 256pp. Main Library U33 .P54 2009 : For almost two centuries the Macedonian phalanx, created by Philip II and refined by his son, Alexander the Great, dominated the battlefields of the ancient world from the sweltering riverbanks of India to the wooded hills of Italy. As the preferred weapon of some of antiquity's greatest commanders, this powerful military system took centre stage in many of the largest and most decisive conflicts of ancient times. Joseph Pietrykowski explores the struggles that shook the ancient world and shaped history. From the structure and composition of the opposing armies, to the strategy of their campaigns, to the leadership decisions and tactics that decided the engagements, Great Battles of the Hellenistic World examines seventeen landmark conflicts from Chaironeia to Pydna over the course of 170 years of bloody warfare.

Great Moments in Greek Archaeology / academic coordinator, Panos Valavanis ; translated by David Hardy ; foreword by Angelos Delivorrias ; essays by George F. Bass ... [et al.].  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, 2007.  379pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection folio DF77 .G74 2007  : This beautifully illustrated book offers a wide-ranging overview of the greatest archaeological sites and discoveries from ancient Greece. The contributors--a veritable who's who of the most venerable names in Greek archaeology--include both those who have excavated at the sites in question and scholars who have spent a lifetime studying the monuments about which they write....Presented here are the legendary sites of ancient Greece, including the Athenian Acropolis, Olympia, Delphi, Schliemann's Mycenae, and the Athenian Agora; the most iconic sculptures in the Greek world, such as the Aphrodite of Melos and the Nike of Samothrace; and several fascinating chapters on underwater archaeology discussing the Kyrenia and Uluburun shipwrecks and the astonishing bronze masterpieces raised from the sea. This is the first book to bring together the archaeological legacy of ancient Greece in a concise and accessible way while still preserving the excitement of discovery. 

Greek and Roman Education : A Sourcebook / Mark Joyal, Iain McDougall, J.C. Yardley.  Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon ; New York, NY : Routledge, 2009.  292pp.  Main Library LA71 .J69 2009 : Modern western education finds its origins in the practices, systems and schools of the ancient Greeks and Romans. It is in the field of education, in fact, that classical antiquity has exerted one of its clearest influences on the modern world. Yet the story of Greek and Roman education, extending from the eighth century B.C. into the Middle Ages, is familiar in its details only to relatively few specialists....Containing nearly 300 translated texts and documents, Greek and Roman Education: A Sourcebook is the first book to provide readers with a large, diverse and representative sample of the primary evidence for ancient Greek and Roman education. A special feature of this Sourcebook is the inclusion not only of the fundamental texts for the study of the subject, but also unfamiliar sources that are of great interest but are not easily accessible, including inscriptions on stone and Greek papyri from Egypt. Introductions to each chapter and to each selection provide the guidance which readers need to set the historical periods, themes and topics into meaningful contexts. Fully illustrated and including extensive suggestions for further reading, together with an index of passages explored, students will have no further need for any other sourcebook on Greek and Roman education.

Greek and Roman Folklore : A Handbook / Graham Anderson. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2006. 234pp. Main Library GR170 .A543 2006 : The Greek and Roman world is often noted for the rationalism of a few outstanding thinkers. This book is about the traditional superstitions, beliefs, taboos, folk-remedies, ghost stories, and folk tales that haunted the rest. It defines and categorizes types of classical folklore, provides examples and texts, reviews scholarship and criticism, and discusses the importance of folklore in the ancient world. The volume closes with a glossary, a bibliography of print and electronic sources, and an extensive index.

Greek and Roman historiography / edited by John Marincola.  Oxford [England] ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.  498pp.  Main Library  DE8 .G74 2011 : A collection of important articles from the last thirty years which treat the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans thought about and wrote their histories. Six of these articles have been translated into English for the first time. Avoiding issues such as sources and reliability which were the concern of earlier scholarship, the contributors focus much more on how the ancients themselves engaged with their past: the relationship between myth and history; the role of memory and oral tradition as they shaped both Greek and Roman notions of the past; the role of the historian in giving form and meaning to his history; and the different notions of historical truth and falsehood. A specially written introduction places the essays in the larger context of earlier and more recent trends in the study of Greek and Roman historiography.

Greek Architecture and Its Sculpture / Ian Jenkins ; line illustrations by Kate Morton. Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2006. 271pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NB90 .J46 2006 : From Athens and Arcadia on one side of the Aegean Sea and from Ionia, Lycia, and Karia on the other, this book brings together some of the great monuments of classical antiquity --among them two of the seven wonders of the ancient world, the later temple of Artemis at Ephesos and the Mausoleum at Halikarnassos....Drawing on the Greek and Lycian architecture and sculpture in the British Museum--a collection second to none in quality, quantity, and geographical and chronological range--this lavishly illustrated volume tells a remarkable story reaching from the archaic temple of Artemis, the Parthenon, and other temples of the Athenian Acropolis to the temple of Apollo at Bassai, the sculptured tombs of Lycia, the Mausoleum, and the temple of Athena Polias at Priene. Ian Jenkins explains each as a work of art and as a historical phenomenon, revealing how the complex personality of these buildings is bound up with the people who funded, designed, built, used, destroyed, discovered, and studied them. With 250 photographs and specially commissioned line drawings, the book comprises a monumental narrative of the art and architecture that gave form, direction, and meaning to much of Western culture.

Greek Art and the Orient / Ann C. Gunter. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 257pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N5630 .G84 2009 : For over a century, scholars have recognized an "orientalizing period" in the history of early Greek art, in which Greek artisans fashioned works of art under the stimulus of Near Eastern imports or resident foreign artisans. Previous studies have emphasized the role of Greek and Phoenician traders in bringing about these contacts with the civilizations of the ancient Near East and Egypt, debating their duration or intensity in the Greek world. In this study, Ann Gunter interrogates the categories of "Greek" and "Oriental" as problematic and shifts emphasis to modes of contact and cultural transfers within a broader regional setting. Her provocative study places Greek encounters with the Near East and Egypt in the context of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, which by the 8th and 7th centuries BCE extended from southern Turkey to western Iran. Using an expanded array of archaeological and textual sources, she argues that crucial aspects of the identity and meaning of foreign works of art were constructed through circumstances of transfer, ownership, and display.

The Greek Poets : Homer to the Present / edited by Peter Constantine ... [et al.] ; introduction by Robert Hass. New York : W. W. Norton & Co., c2010. 692pp. Main Library PA3622.C63 G74 2010 : This landmark volume captures three millennia of Greek poetry--more than 1,000 poems and 200 poets. From the epics of Homeric Greece to the historical and erotic ironies of Cavafy, from the romances, hymns, and bawdy rhymes of Byzantium to the innovative voices of a resurgent twentieth century, this anthology brings together the diverse strands of the Greek poetic tradition. The favorites are all here--raging Achilles, restless Odysseus, strong-hearted Penelope--but The Greek Poets also presents neglected eras, from the rise of Constantinople to the end of the Ottoman occupation. In offering canonical poets such as Sappho and Pindar, and the modern Nobel laureates Seferis and Elytis, the renowned editors give us their new translations and bring together other masterful translators, including Robert Fagles, James Merrill, and W. S. Merwin, along with a younger generation that includes Anne Carson, Paul Muldoon, and Alicia Stallings. This is an essential companion to the Western literary tradition.

Greek Thought : A Guide to Classical Knowledge / edited by Jacques Brunschwig and Geoffrey E.R. Lloyd, with the collaboration of Pierre Pellegrin ; translated under the direction of Catherine Porter. Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2000. 1024pp. Main Library DF78 .S2313 2000 : Ancient Greek thought is the essential wellspring from which the intellectual, ethical, and political civilization of the West draws and to which, even today, we repeatedly return. In more than sixty essays by an international team of scholars, this volume explores the full breadth and reach of Greek thought--investigating what the Greeks knew as well as what they thought about what they knew, and what they believed, invented, and understood about the conditions and possibilities of knowing. Calling attention to the characteristic reflexivity of Greek thought, the analysis in this book reminds us of what our own reflections owe to theirs....In sections devoted to philosophy, politics, the pursuit of knowledge, major thinkers, and schools of thought, this work shows us the Greeks looking at themselves, establishing the terms for understanding life, language, production, and action. The authors evoke not history, but the stories the Greeks told themselves about history; not their poetry, but their poetics; not their speeches, but their rhetoric. Essays that survey political, scientific, and philosophical ideas, such as those on Utopia and the Critique of Politics, Observation and Research, and Ethics; others on specific fields from Astronomy and History to Mathematics and Medicine; new perspectives on major figures, from Anaxagoras to Zeno of Elea; studies of core traditions from the Milesians to the various versions of Platonism: together these offer a sense of the unquenchable thirst for knowledge that marked Greek civilization--and that Aristotle considered a natural and universal trait of humankind. With thirty-two pages of color illustrations, this work conveys the splendor and vitality of the Greek intellectual adventure.

Greek Tragedy and Political Philosophy : Rationalism and Religion in Sophocles' Theban Plays / Peter J. Ahrensdorf. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 192pp. Main Library JC73 .A37 2009 : In this book, Peter Ahrensdorf examines Sophocles' powerful analysis of a central question of political philosophy and a perennial question of political life: Should citizens and leaders govern political society by the light of unaided human reason or religious faith? Through a fresh examination of Sophocles' timeless masterpieces - Oedipus the Tyrant, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone - Ahrensdorf offers a sustained challenge to the prevailing view, championed by Nietzsche in his attack on Socratic rationalism, that Sophocles is an opponent of rationalism. Ahrensdorf argues that Sophocles is a genuinely philosophical thinker and a rationalist, albeit one who advocates a cautious political rationalism. Such rationalism constitutes a middle way between an immoderate political rationalism that dismisses religion - exemplified in Oedipus the Tyrant - and a piety that rejects reason - exemplified by Oedipus at Colonus. Ahrensdorf concludes with an incisive analysis of Nietzsche, Socrates, and Aristotle on tragedy and philosophy. He argues, against Nietzsche, that the rationalism of Socrates and Aristotle incorporates a profound awareness of the tragic dimension of human existence and therefore resembles in fundamental ways the somber and humane rationalism of Sophocles.

Greek Vase-Painting and the Origins of Visual Humour / Alexandre G. Mitchell. New York, NY : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 371pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NK4645 .M62 2009 : This book is a comprehensive study of visual humour in ancient Greece, with special emphasis on works created in Athens and Boeotia. Alexandre Mitchell brings an interdisciplinary approach to this topic, combining theories and methods of art history, archaeology, and classics with the anthropology of humour, and thereby establishing new ways of looking at art and visual humour in particular. Understanding what visual humour was to the ancients and how it functioned as a tool of social cohesion is only one facet of this study. Mitchell also focuses on the social truths that his study of humour unveils: democracy and freedom of expression, politics and religion, Greek vases and trends in fashion, market-driven production, proper and improper behaviour, popular versus elite culture, carnival in situ, and the place of women, foreigners, workers, and labourers within the Greek city. Richly illustrated with more than 140 drawings and photographs, as well as with analytical tables of comic representations according to different themes, painters, and techniques, this study amply documents the comic representations that formed an important part of ancient Greek visual language from the 6th through 4th centuries BC.

Greek warfare : from the Battle of Marathon to the conquests of Alexander the Great / Lee L. Brice, Editor.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : ABC-CLIO, c2012.  308pp.  Main Library DF89 .B75 2012  : This reference book looks at ancient Greek (490-323 BCE) military history, up to and including the battles of Alexander the Great. It is edited by Lee L. Brice (history, Western Illinois U.). The book is organized in two major sections. The first is an alphabetical encyclopedia of persons, places, groups, battles, and tactical terms. Each ends with references and a "see also" section. Accounts of persons (Alexander) and places (Sicily) are given in relation to warfare, with accounts of politics and society as a background to understanding wars, in the style of 19th century European history instruction. Many entries are written by the editor. The second section is a compilation of ancient accounts of specific Classical Greek battles. It includes material from Herotodus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Diodorus Siculus and Polyaenus, and Arrian. The translations are in plain language from the Victorian era or the early 20th century. The book includes some small black and white photographs and a number of tables. There is a chronology, a glossary, a bibliography, a contributor's list, and a categorical index.

The Greeks and their past : poetry, oratory and history in the fifth century BCE / Jonas Grethlein.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  350pp.  Main Library PA3009 .G74 2010 : Ancient Greeks remembered their past before the rise of historiography and after it poetry and oratory continued to serve commemorative functions. This book explores the field of literary memory in the fifth century BCE, juxtaposing the works of Herodotus and Thucydides with samples from epinician poetry, elegy, tragedy and oratory. Various socio-political contexts and narrative forms lent themselves to the expression of diverse attitudes towards the past. At the same time, a common gravitational centre can be observed which is distinct from modern ideas of history. As well as presenting a broad overview on memory in various genres, Professor Grethlein sheds new light on the rise of Greek historiography. He views Herodotus and Thucydides against the background of memory in poetry and oratory and thereby elucidates the tension between tradition and continuity in which the shaping of historiography as a genre took place.

Greeks on the Black Sea : Ancient Art from the Hermitage / edited by Anna A. Trofimova.  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2007.  307pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N5871.U472 B554 2007 : The ancient Greeks traveled widely by sea and founded colonies in far-flung locations. On the north coast of the Black Sea were a number of such Greek settlements, places where the Greeks made contact with the local Scythian population. Greek goods were traded extensively throughout the region, and many of these often-luxurious articles eventually made their way into tombs.
From its wealth of such Greek finds from the Black Sea, the State Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg has lent some 175 Greek objects to an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum at the Getty Villa. This richly illustrated catalogue to the exhibition presents nine essays on the archaeology of the northern Black Sea region and its history, culture, and art, including sculpture, pottery, gems, and jewelry. Written by curators at the State Hermitage Museum, Greeks on the Black Sea presents an intriguing world at once Greek and barbarian.

Growing Up Fatherless in Antiquity / edited by Sabine R. Hübner and David M. Ratzan.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  333pp.  Main Library HQ777.4 .G76 2009 : As the changes in the traditional family accelerated toward the end of the twentieth century, a great deal of attention came to focus on fathers, both modern and ancient. While academics and politicians alike singled out the conspicuous and growing absence of the modern father as a crucial factor affecting contemporary family and social dynamics, ancient historians and classicists have rarely explored ancient father-absence, despite the likelihood that nearly a third of all children in the ancient Mediterranean world were fatherless before they turned fifteen. The proportion of children raised by single mothers, relatives, step-parents, or others was thus at least as high in antiquity as it is today. This book assesses the wide-ranging impact high levels of chronic father-absence had on the cultures, politics, and families of the ancient world.

Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out.  If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

New Books, H-K

Hadrian and The Triumph of Rome / Anthony Everitt.  New York : Random House, c2009.  392pp.  Main Library DG295 .E84 2009  : In Hadrian and the Triumph of Rome - the first major account of the emperor in nearly a century - Anthony Everitt presents a biography of the man whom he calls arguably "the most successful of Rome's rulers."...Born in A.D. 76, Hadrian lived through and ruled during a tempestuous era, a time when the Colosseum was opened to the public and Pompeii was buried under a mountain of lava and ash. Everitt vividly recounts Hadrian's thrilling life, in which the emperor brings a century of disorder and costly warfare to a peaceful conclusion while demonstrating how a monarchy can be compatible with good governance. Hadrian was brave and astute - despite his sometimes prickly demeanor - as well as an accomplished huntsman, poet, and student of philosophy....What distinguished Hadrian's rule, according to Everitt, were two insights that inevitably ensured the empire's long and prosperous future: He ended Rome's territorial expansion, which had become strategically and economically untenable, by fortifying her boundaries (the many famed Walls of Hadrian), and he effectively "Hellenized" Rome by anointing Athens the empire's cultural center, thereby making Greek learning and art vastly more prominent in Roman life....Everitt illuminates Hadrian's private life, including his marriage to Sabina - a loveless, frequently unhappy bond that bore no heirs - and his enduring yet doomed relationship with the true love of his life, Antinous, a beautiful young Bithynian man. Everitt also covers Hadrian's war against the Jews, which planted the seeds of present-day discord in the Middle East.

Hadrian : Empire and Conflict / Thorsten Opper.  Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2008.  256pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection DG295 .O67 2008 : Even in the panoply of Roman history, Hadrian stands out. Emperor from 117 to 138 ad, he was at once a benevolent ruler and a ruthless military leader, known for his restless and ambitious nature, his interest in architecture, and his passion for Greek culture. This book moves beyond the familiar image of Hadrian to offer a new appraisal of this Emperor’s contradictory personality, his exploits and accomplishments, his rule, and his military role, against the backdrop of his twenty-one-year reign....Lavishly illustrated with key works of art and objects, celebrated and little-known sculptures, bronzes, coins and medals, drawings, and watercolors from museums around the globe, the book conveys a vivid sense of the world Hadrian inhabited. Thorsten Opper shows the emperor from many angles—as a complex individual, as a military leader and strategist, as the amateur architect who created magnificent buildings such as his villa at Tivoli (an empire in miniature), as the lover who deified his male lover Antinous after his mysterious death in the Nile, and, finally, as the traveler who tirelessly roamed his empire and its boundaries....From his place in Roman history to his legacy, which even makes its way into the popular culture of our day, the Hadrian who emerges from these pages is no longer larger than life; rather, he has all the depth and complexity, the color and shadings and detail of life itself.

Hannibal's Last Battle : Zama and the Fall of Carthage / Brian Todd Carey ; Joshua B. Allfree, tactical map illustrator ; John Cairns, regional map illustrator. Yardley, Pa. : Westholme, Pub., c2008.  204pp.  Main Library DG247.97 .C37 2008 : In 202 BC, near the North African city of Zama, the armies of two empires clashed for the last time.  The Romans under Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal's Carthaginians for the last time, swinging the balance of power in the Mediterranean world.

Hellenistic and Roman Ideal Sculpture : the Allure of the Classical / Rachel Meredith Kousser.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.  208pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NB94 .K69 2008 : An illuminating analysis showing the power and allure of Greek Classical past in Hellenistic and Roman art.

The Hemlock Cup : Socrates, Athens and the Search for the Good Life / Bettany Hughes.  London : Jonathan Cape, 2010.  486pp.  Main Library B316 .H84 2010 : We think the way we do because Socrates thought the way he did. His aphorism 'The unexamined life is not worth living' may have originated twenty-five centuries ago, but it is a founding principle of modern life. Socrates lived and contributed to a city that nurtured key ingredients of contemporary civilisation -- democracy, liberty, science, drama, rational thought -- yet, as he wrote nothing in his lifetime, he himself is an enigmatic figure....The Hemlock Cup gives Socrates the biography he deserves, setting him in the context of the Eastern Mediterranean that was his home, and dealing with him as he himself dealt with the world. Socrates was a soldier, a lover, a man of the people. He philosophised neither in grand educational establishments nor the courts of kings but in the squares and public arenas of Golden Age Athens. He lived through an age of extraordinary materialism, in which a democratic culture turned to the glorification of its own city; when war was declared under the banner of democracy; and when tolerance turned into intimidation on streets once populated by the likes of Euripides, Sophocles and Pericles. For seventy years he was a vigorous citizen of one of the greatest capitals on earth, but then his beloved Athens turned on him, condemning him to death by poison. Socrates' pursuit of personal liberty is a vibrant story that Athens did not want us to hear, but which must be told...Bettany Hughes has painstakingly pieced together Socrates' life, following in his footsteps across Greece and Asia Minor, and examining the new archaeological discoveries that shed light on his world. In The Hemlock Cup she reveals the human heart of the man, and relates a story that is as relevant now as it has ever been.

The Herculaneum Women : History, Context, Identities / edited by Jens Daehner ; with texts by Jens Daehner ... [et al.].  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum ; Dresden : Skulpturensammlung, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, c2007.  178pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NB169 .H47 2007 : About 1710, three life-size marble statues of women were found near Portici on the Bay of Naples. This discovery led to further exploration of the site, which was soon identified as the ancient city of Herculaneum, one of the towns buried in the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79. The statues became famous throughout Europe as the "Herculaneum Women." First brought to Vienna, they have been in the Antiquities Collection in Dresden since 1736....This book presents for the first time in any language the comprehensive story of these famous statues, including their discovery, archaeological context, art history, interpretation, (an ongoing debate), and the impact of the Greek statuary types on representations of Roman women throughout the Mediterranean. No other models of the draped female body were used more often in Roman sculpture to carry individual portraits, including those of empresses, than the Large and Small Herculaneum Women.

Histoires Grecques : Snapshots From Antiquity / Maurice Sartre ; translated by Catherine Porter.  Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2009.  422pp.  Main Library DF214 .S3413 2009  : In a series of brilliant snapshots, each a distinct bit of a larger story, Maurice Sartre’s Histoires Grecques spans the grand narrative of Greek culture over a thousand years and a vast expanse of land and sea. From Homer to Damascius, from recent discoveries in Kandahar to an account of the murder of Hypatia in 415 CE, each snapshot captures a moment in the history of Greek civilization. Together they offer a fresh perspective on an ancient culture whose wealth and depth of thought, variety and multiplicity of accomplishments, and astonishing continuity through time and space have made it the Western world’s culture of reference....A textual fragment, a coin, an epigraph: each artifact and image launches Sartre—and his readers—on a journey into the practical mysteries of Greek civilization. Ranging from Afghanistan to the Mediterranean world, these excursions—step by step, moment by moment—finally amount to a panoramic vision of one of the most important civilizations of all time. Histoires Grecques shows the newcomer and the seasoned scholar alike how history itself is written—and imparts the experience, and the pleasure, of discovering history as discrete stories seen through the eyes of one of the most eminent historians of ancient Greece.

Histories of Alexander the Great. Book 10 / Curtius Rufus ; introduction and historical commentary by J.E. Atkinson ; translated by J.C. Yardley.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 274pp.  Main Library DF234 .C81245 2009 : This book presents a translation, with commentary, of a major Roman source on the end of the reign of Alexander the Great. Book 10 of Curtius' Histories covers the reign of terror and mutiny that followed upon Alexander's return from India; and offers the fullest account of the power struggle that began in Babylon immediately after his death. The Introduction establishes a profile of Curtius Rufus (quite probably a Roman Senator of the first century AD), and his agenda as a historian. John Yardley's translation and the commentary are designed for the reader without Latin. The Commentary provides detailed analysis of the historical events of the crucial period 325-3 BC covered by Curtius, and also tries to get behind the surface level of meaning to show how Curtius intended his history to be a text for his time. Curtius' text is also examined as a literary achievement in its own right

A History of Ancient Greek : From the Beginnings to Late Antiquity / edited for the Centre for the Greek Language by A.-F. Christidis ; with the assistance of Maria Arapopoulou, Maria Chriti.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, c2007.  1617pp.  Main Library PA227 .H5713 2007 : This book provides the most comprehensive account of the history of the Greek language from its beginnings to late antiquity. In this revised and expanded translation of the Greek original published in 2001, a distinguished international team of scholars goes beyond a merely technical treatment of the subject by examining the language's relationship with politics, society and culture. An attempt is made to cover all aspects of the history of Greek, including those that are usually considered marginal, such as obscene language, the language of the gods and child talk. Other topics which receive particular emphasis are language contact and translation practices in antiquity. The book's clear organisation and concise chapters make it highly readable and accessible to non-specialists, and the text is supported by example passages from primary sources and numerous informative illustrations. It is an essential reference work for all those interested in the history of Greek.

A History of Private Life from Pagan Rome to Byzantium (Volume 1)  /   Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1987.  Main Library HN8 .H5713 1987 : First of the widely celebrated and sumptuously illustrated series, this book reveals in intimate detail what life was really like in the ancient world. Behind the vast panorama of the pagan Roman empire, the reader discovers the intimate daily lives of citizens and slaves--from concepts of manhood and sexuality to marriage and the family, the roles of women, chastity and contraception, techniques of childbirth, homosexuality, religion, the meaning of virtue, and the separation of private and public spaces. The emergence of Christianity in the West and the triumph of Christian morality with its emphasis on abstinence, celibacy, and austerity is startlingly contrasted with the profane and undisciplined private life of the Byzantine Empire. Using illuminating motifs, the authors weave a rich, colorful fabric ornamented with the results of new research and the broad interpretations that only masters of the subject can provide.

The History of the Ancient World : From the Earliest Accounts to the Fall of Rome / Susan Wise Bauer.  New York : W.W. Norton, c2007. 868pp.  Main Library D57 .B38 2007 : This is the first volume in a new, accessible, narrative world history series. Bauer (College of William and Mary) seasons her prose with interesting details, such as the use of peppercorns to help support Ramses II's "distinctively large nose" during his embalming so that the "tight bandages would not flatten it." Brief chapters and comparative time lines allow readers to make steady progress through the volume's 856 pages. Bauer justifies her approach to such a sprawling topic: "in this volume, we will not spend a great deal of time in Australia, or the Americas, or for that matter Africa, but for a slightly different reason. The oral histories of these cultures, old as they are, don't stretch back nearly as far as the older lists of kings from Mesopotamia...." Indeed, the book's subtitle would more accurately be "From the Earliest Written Accounts to the Reign of Constantine." Bauer does not reach the fall of Rome, but rather the transformation of pagan Rome into "something much more powerful, both for good and for evil."

Homer in the Twentieth Century : Between World Literature and the Western Canon / edited by Barbara Graziosi and Emily Greenwood.  New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.  332pp.  Main Library PA4037 .H7775 2007 : This collection of essays explores the crucial place of Homer in the shifting cultural landscape of the twentieth century. It argues that Homer was viewed both as the founding father of the Western literary canon and as sharing important features with poems, performances, and traditions which were often deemed neither literary nor Western: the epics of Yugoslavia and sub-Saharan Africa, the keening performances of Irish women, the spontaneous inventiveness of the Blues. The book contributes to current debates about the nature of the Western literary canon, the evolving notion of world literature, the relationship between orality and the written word, and the dialogue between texts across time and space. Homer in the Twentieth Century contends that the Homeric poems play an important role in shaping those debates and, conversely, that the experiences of the twentieth century open new avenues for the interpretation of Homer's much-travelled texts.

Homer the preclassic / Gregory Nagy.  Berkeley : University of California Press, [2011], c2010.  414pp.  Main Library PA4037 .N344 2011 : Homer the Preclassic considers the development of the Homeric poems - in particular the Iliad and Odyssey - during the time when they were still part of the oral tradition. Gregory Nagy traces the evolution of rival "Homers” and the different versions of Homeric poetry in this pretextual period, reconstructed over a time frame extending back from the sixth century BCE to the Bronze Age. Accurate in their linguistic detail and surprising in their implications, Nagy's insights conjure the Greeks' nostalgia for the imagined "epic space” of Troy and for the resonances and distortions this mythic past provided to the various Greek constituencies for whom the Homeric poems were so central and definitive.

Homeric Voices : Discourse, Memory, Gender / Elizabeth Minchin.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.  310pp.  Main Library PA4177.C64 M56 2007 : Homeric Voices is a study, from a compositional point of view, of the substantial speeches and exchanges of speech that Homer depicts in his songs. Drawing on research in sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and cognitive psychology, Elizabeth Minchin considers the words that Homer attributes to his characters from two perspectives, as cognitive and as social phenomena. She asks how the poet worked with memory to generate the speech forms that he represents; and how Homeric speech constructs and reveals the social hierarchies that are bound up with age, status, and gender--with particular interest in gender--in the world of the poems.

Homer's Odyssey and the Near East / Bruce Louden.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  356pp.  Main Library PA4167 .L67  2010 : The Odyssey's larger plot is composed of a number of distinct genres of myth, all of which are extant in various Near Eastern cultures (Mesopotamian, West Semitic, Egyptian). Unexpectedly, the Near Eastern culture with which the Odyssey has the most parallels is the Old Testament. Consideration of how much of the Odyssey focuses on non-heroic episodes - hosts receiving guests, a king disguised as a beggar, recognition scenes between long-separated family members - reaffirms the Odyssey's parallels with the Bible. In particular the book argues that the Odyssey is in a dialogic relationship with Genesis, which features the same three types of myth that comprise the majority of the Odyssey: theoxeny, romance (Joseph in Egypt), and Argonautic myth (Jacob winning Rachel from Laban). The Odyssey also offers intriguing parallels to the Book of Jonah, and Odysseus' treatment by the suitors offers close parallels to the Gospels' depiction of Christ in Jerusalem.

Horace : Odes and Epodes / edited by Michèle Lowrie.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  472pp.  Main Library PA6411 .H5953 2009 : This collection of recent articles provides convenient access to some of the best recent writing on Horace's Odes and Epodes. Formalist, structuralist, and historicizing approaches alike offer insight into this complex poet, who reinvented lyric at the transition from the Republic to the Augustan principate. Several classic studies in French, German, and Italian are here translated into English for the first time. A thread linking many of the pieces is the recurring debate over the performance of Horace's Odes. Fiction? Literal reality? A figurative appropriation of Greek tradition within the bookish culture of late Hellenism? Arguments both for and against gain a hearing. Michele Lowrie's introduction surveys the state of current scholarship and offers guidance on the seminal issues confronting the interpretation of Horatian lyric today. Suggestions for further reading and a consolidated bibliography open avenues for more extensive research.

Horace : Satires and Epistles / edited by Kirk Freudenburg.  Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2009.  518pp.  Main Library PA6411 .H596 2009 : The articles included in this volume represent some of the finest writing on Horace's satires (Sermones) and epistles (Epistulae) over the past fifty years. Several have previously only been accessible in specialist journals, while five appear here for the first time in English translation. All are remarkable for the way in which they do their work at multiple levels, moving from the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and syntax to issues of genre, socio-politics, and beyond. Collectively, these articles underscore and exemplify the value of close reading, and of paying strict attention to detail. Starting with the specifics of the poetic page, they lead us into the various complex and overlapping discursive systems that Horace's poems both arise from and seek to address. A specially written Introduction surveys recent scholarship, and the specific impact of each article included.

How Rome Fell : Death of a Superpower / Adrian Goldsworthy.  New Haven [Conn.] : Yale University Press, 2009.  531pp.  Main Library DG311 .G65 2009 : In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable. Its vast territory accounted for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. What accounts for this improbable decline? Here, Adrian Goldsworthy applies the scholarship, perspective, and narrative skill that defined his monumental Caesar to address perhaps the greatest of all historical questions—how Rome fell....It was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state.

The ides : Caesar's murder and the war for Rome / Stephen Dando-Collins.  Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, c2010.  269pp.  Main Library DG267 .D26 2010 : Trying to clear away the "twaddle" that surrounds Julius Caesar, Dando-Collins provides a page-turner of a history describing step-by-step the events leading to the assassination of Julius Caesar and the impact of his removal on the collapse of the Roman Republic. Caesar's rise to power and his limitless ambition posed an immediate threat to the survival of the Republic, which caused fear and consternation in those, such as Marcus Brutus, who nobly wished to defend Roman democracy. Brutus and his fellow senator Cassius planned the assassination and, with the help of yet other senators, carried it out on March 15, 44 B.C.E. Public sentiment originally favored the Liberators, as the assassins were known, but, thanks to the scheming of Marc Antony and the fickleness of the crowds, Brutus, Cassius, and others were forced to flee the city. In the months that followed, Antony and his sometime ally, Caesar's heir, Octavian, destroyed the Liberators only to later wage war against each other. Antony's ultimate defeat led to Octavian's installation as the first emperor, Augustus Caesar. The dramatic story examines the roles of soldiers, politicians, philosophers, wives, and mistresses with perhaps too much emphasis placed on the ever-popular Cleopatra.  Publishers Weekly.

The Iliad / Homer ; translated by Rodney Merrill.  Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2007.  464pp.  Main Library PA4025.A2 M46 2007 : A new translation of Homer's classic follows Merrill's successful earlier version of the Odyssey in capturing the feel of the original Greek/  Retells the events of the war between Greece and the city of Troy, focusing on Achilles' quarrel with Agamemnon.

The image of the poet in Ovid's Metamorphoses / Barbara Pavlock.  Madison, Wis. : University of Wisconsin Press, c2009.  198pp.  Main Library PA6519.M9 P385 2009 : Barbara Pavlock unmasks major figures in Ovid’s Metamorphoses as surrogates for his narrative persona, highlighting the conflicted revisionist nature of the Metamorphoses. Although Ovid ostensibly validates traditional customs and institutions, instability is in fact a defining feature of both the core epic values and his own poetics....The Image of the Poet explores issues central to Ovid’s poetics—the status of the image, the generation of plots, repetition, opposition between refined and inflated epic style, the reliability of the narrative voice, and the interrelation of rhetoric and poetry. The work explores the constructed author and complements recent criticism focusing on the reader in the text.

Images of Children in Byzantium / Cecily Hennessy.  Farnham, England ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2008.  263pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N7640 .H46 2008 :  Covers the representation of children in Byzantium. This book demonstrates that children are featured often in visual imagery and in key locations, indicating that they played a central role in Byzantine life. It reveals important aspects of childhood, youth, and by extension adulthood in Byzantine society. 

Imagining Men : Ideals of Masculinity in Ancient Greek Culture / Thomas Van Nortwick.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.  166pp.  Main Library DF93 .V36 2008 : Exploring models for masculinity as they appear in major works of Greek literature, this book combines literary, historical, and psychological insights to examine how the ancient Greeks understood the meaning of a man's life. The thoughts and actions of Achilles, Odysseus, Oedipus, and other enduring characters from Greek literature reflect the imperatives that the ancient Greeks saw as governing a man's life as he moved from childhood to adult maturity to old age. Because the Greeks believed that men (as opposed to women) were by nature the proper agents of human civilization within the larger order of the universe, examining how the Greeks thought that a man ought to live his life prompts exploration of the place of human life in a world governed by transcendent forces, nature, fate, and the gods.

In Pursuit of Ancient Pasts : a History of Classical Archaeology in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries / Stephen L. Dyson.  New Haven : Yale University Press, c2006.  316pp.  Main Library CC100 .D97 2006 : The stories behind the acquisition of ancient antiquities are often as important as those that tell of their creation. This fascinating book provides a comprehensive account of the history and development of classical archaeology, explaining how and why artifacts have moved from foreign soil to collections around the world....As archaeologist Stephen Dyson shows, Greek and Roman archaeological study was closely intertwined with ideas about class and social structure; the rise of nationalism and later political ideologies such as fascism; and the physical and cultural development of most of the important art museums in Europe and the United States, whose prestige depended on their creation of collections of classical art. Accompanied by a discussion of the history of each of the major national traditions and their significant figures, this lively book shows how classical archaeology has influenced attitudes about areas as wide-ranging as tourism, nationalism, the role of the museum, and historicism in nineteenth- and twentieth-century art.

The Invention of Athens : the Funeral Oration in the Classical City / Nicole Loraux ; translated by Alan Sheridan.  New York : Zone Books ; Cambridge, Mass. : Distributed by the MIT Press, 2006.  539pp.  Main Library PA3264 .L6713 2006 : A revised edition of a groundbreaking work tracing the rhetoric, politics, and ideology of funeral orations in ancient Greece, arguing that they served to celebrate the city of Athens and the Athenian citizen.

It's All Greek to Me : From Homer to the Hippocratic Oath, How Ancient Greece Has Shaped Our World / Charlotte Higgins.  New York : Harper, c2010. 229pp.  Main Library DF78 .H63 2010  : Why is ancient Greece important? Because, quite simply, if we want to understand the modern Western world, we need to look back to the Greeks. Consider the way we think about ethics, about the nature of beauty and truth, about our place in the universe, about our mortality. All this we have learned from the ancient Greeks. They molded the basic disciplines and genres in which we still organize thought, from poetry to drama, from medicine to philosophy, from history to ethnography....Packed with useful facts, including a timeline, a "mythology for dummies," a who's who, a guide to Homer's epics, and a handy map for those struggling to know their Lemnos from their Lesbos, It's All Greek to Me is an entertaining and insightful tour through the world of the ancient Greeks. Why are some laws Draconian? What is an Achilles' heel? Why were the Spartans spartan? Charlotte Higgins provides these answers and more, arming average readers with the knowledge they need to understand the Greeks and their tremendous contributions to our lives. This book aims to unlock the richness of a fascinating culture and place it where it should be—in the mainstream of life.

Jerusalem's Traitor : Josephus, Masada, and the Fall of Judea / Desmond Seward.   Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, c2009.  314pp.  Main Library DS115.9.J6 S42 2009 : When the Jews revolted against Rome in 66 CE, Josephus, a Jerusalem aristocrat, was made a general in his nation’s army. Captured by the Romans, he saved his skin by finding favor with the emperor Vespasian. He then served as an adviser to the Roman legions, running a network of spies inside Jerusalem, in the belief that the Jews’ only hope of survival lay in surrender to Rome....As a Jewish eyewitness who was given access to Vespasian’s campaign notebooks, Josephus is our only source of information for the war of extermination that ended in the destruction of Jerusalem and its Temple, and the amazing times in which he lived. He is of vital importance for anyone interested in the Middle East, Jewish history, and the early history of Christianity.

The Jewish revolts against Rome, a.d. 66-135 : a military analysis / James J. Bloom.  Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Co publishers, 2010.  286pp. Main Library DS111.6 .B56 2010 :  During the first and second centuries A.D., the supremacy of the Roman Empire was aggressively challenged by three Jewish rebellions. The facts surrounding the initial uprising of A.D. 66-74 have been filtered through the biased accounts of Judeao Roman historian Flavius Josephus. Primary information regarding the subsequent Diaspora Revolt (A.D. 115-117) and the Bar Kochba Rebellion (A.D. 132-135) is limited to fragmentary anecdotes emphasizing the religious implications of the two insurrections. In contrast, this analytical history focuses objectively on the military aspects of all three Judean uprisings. The events leading up to each rebellion are detailed, while the nine appendices cover such topics as the nature and number of the Jewish rebels and the factual reliability of the controversial Josephus. One appendix hypothesizes an alternative history of the war between Jerusalem and Rome.

Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out. If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk. 

New Books, L-N

The Landmark Xenophon's Hellenika : a New Translation / by John Marincola ; with maps, annotations, appendices, and encyclopedic index edited by Robert B. Strassler ; with an introduction by David Thomas.  New York : Pantheon Books, 2009. 579pp.  Main Library DF214 .X4613 2009 : Hellenika covers the years between 411 and 362 B.C.E., a particularly dramatic period during which the alliances among Athens, Sparta, Thebes, and Persia were in constant flux. And along with the vol­umes of Herodotus and Thucydides, it completes an ancient narrative of the military and political history of classical Greece....Illustrated, annotated, and filled with maps, this edition gives us a new, authoritative, and accessible translation by John Marincola, an introduction by David Thomas, and fourteen appendices written by some of the premiere classics scholars at work today. And unlike any other edition of the Hellenika, it also includes the relevant texts of Diodorus Siculus and the Oxyrhynchus historian, which constitute the only contemporaneous works that can be used to assess Xenophon’s reliability and quality as a historian.

Language and History in Ancient Greek Culture / Martin Ostwald. Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2009. 322pp. Main Library JC73 .O88 2009 : Spanning forty years, this collection of essays represents the work of a renowned teacher and scholar of the Ancient Greek world. Martin Ostwald's contribution is both philological and historical: the thread that runs through all of the essays is his precise explanation, for a modern audience, of some crucial terms by which the ancient Greeks saw and lived their lives—and influenced ours. Chosen and sequenced by Ostwald, the essays demonstrate his methodology and elucidate essential aspects of ancient Greek society....The first section plumbs the social and political terms in which the Greeks understood their lives. It examines their notion of the relation of the citizen to his community; how they conceived different kinds of political structure; what role ideology played in public life; and how differently their most powerful thinkers viewed issues of war and peace. The second section is devoted to the problem, first articulated by the Greeks, of the extent to which human life is dominated by nature (physis) and human convention (nomos), a question that remains a central concern in modern societies, even if in different guises. The third section focuses on democracy in Athens. It confronts questions of the nature of democratic rule, of financing public enterprises, of the accountability of public officials, of the conflict raised by imperial control and democratic rule, of the coexistence of "conservative" and "liberal" trends in a democratic regime, and of the relation between rhetoric and power in a democracy. The final section is a sketch of the principles on which the two greatest Greek historians, Herodotus and Thucydides, constructed their outlooks on human affairs....Ultimately, the collection intends to make selected key concepts in ancient Greek social and political culture accessible to a lay audience. It also shows how the differences—rather than the similarities—between the ancient Greeks and us can contribute to a deeper understanding of our own time.

The Language of Empire : Rome and The Idea of Empire From the Third Century BC to the Second Century AD / John Richardson.   Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.  220pp.  Main Library DG271 .R5 2008 : The Roman Empire has been an object of fascination for the past two millennia, and the story of how a small city in central Italy came to dominate the whole of the Mediterranean basin, most of modern Europe and the lands of Asia Minor and the Middle East, has often been told. It has provided the model for European empires from Charlemagne to Queen Victoria and beyond, and is still the basis of comparison for investigators of modern imperialisms. By an exhaustive investigation of the changing meanings of certain key words and their use in the substantial remains of Roman writings and in the structures of Roman political life, this book seeks to discover what the Romans themselves thought about their imperial power in the centuries in which they conquered the known world and formed the empire of the first and second centuries AD.

The Language of the Muses : the Dialogue Between Roman and Greek Sculpture / Miranda Marvin. Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2008. 304pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NB115 .M273 2008 : Since the Renaissance, it has been a generally accepted thesis that almost all Roman sculptures depicting ideal figures, such as gods, personifications, and figures from myth, were copies of Greek originals. This book traces the origin of that thesis to the academic belief in the mythical perfection of now-lost Greek art, which contrasted with the reality of the "imperfection" of Roman works....In a new take on long-held beliefs, Johann Joachim Winckelmann's role is found to be less important than those of Giorgio Vasari and Ennio Quirino Visconti. The author argues that, contrary to the accepted wisdom of the last three hundred years, Roman sculpture had very much its own style and ideals. This synthesis of the history of the study of Roman sculpture does away with the idea that the genre of ideal works consists of mechanical copies and argues that they are, rather, creative adaptations.

The Last Pagans of Rome / Alan Cameron.  New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.  878pp.  Main Library BR170 .C36 2011 : Rufinus' vivid account of the battle between the Eastern Emperor Theodosius and the Western usurper Eugenius by the River Frigidus in 394 represents it as the final confrontation between paganism and Christianity. It is indeed widely believed that a largely pagan aristocracy remained a powerful and active force well into the fifth century, sponsoring pagan literary circles, patronage of the classics, and propaganda for the old cults in art and literature. The main focus of much modern scholarship on the end of paganism in the West has been on its supposed stubborn resistance to Christianity. The dismantling of this romantic myth is one of the main goals of Alan Cameron's book. Actually, the book argues, Western paganism petered out much earlier and more rapidly than hitherto assumed....The subject of this book is not the conversion of the last pagans but rather the duration, nature, and consequences of their survival. By re-examining the abundant textual evidence, both Christian (Ambrose, Augustine, Jerome, Paulinus, Prudentius) and "pagan" (Claudian, Macrobius, and Ammianus Marcellinus), as well as the visual evidence (ivory diptychs, illuminated manuscripts, silverware), Cameron shows that most of the activities and artifacts previously identified as hallmarks of a pagan revival were in fact just as important to the life of cultivated Christians. Far from being a subversive activity designed to rally pagans, the acceptance of classical literature, learning, and art by most elite Christians may actually have helped the last reluctant pagans to finally abandon the old cults and adopt Christianity. The culmination of decades of research, The Last Pagans of Rome will overturn many long-held assumptions about pagan and Christian culture in the Late Antique West

Latin alive : the survival of Latin in English and Romance languages / Joseph Solodow.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009 [c2010]  356pp.  Main Library PA2057 .S65 2009 : In Latin Alive, Joseph Solodow tells the story of how Latin developed into modern French, Spanish, and Italian, and deeply affected English as well. Offering a gripping narrative of language change, Solodow charts Latin's course from classical times to the modern era, with focus on the first millennium of the Common Era. Though the Romance languages evolved directly from Latin, Solodow shows how every important feature of Latin's evolution is also reflected in English. His story includes scores of intriguing etymologies, along with many concrete examples of texts, studies, scholars, anecdotes, and historical events; observations on language; and more. Written with crystalline clarity, this is the first book to tell the story of the Romance languages for the general reader and to illustrate so amply Latin's many-sided survival in English as well.

A Latin Lover in Ancient Rome : Readings in Propertius and His Genre / W.R. Johnson. Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2009. 165pp. Main Library PA6059.E6 J64 2009 : Over the centuries, Latin love elegy has inspired love poetry in the West from Petrarch to Pound. A Latin Lover in Ancient Rome: Readings in Propertius and His Genre offers a critical reevaluation of the Latin elegiac poet Propertius, situating him within the social and political milieu of first-century BCE Rome. W. R. Johnson’s study is centered on close readings of the poems in Propertius’ four books that emphasize both his celebration of erotic freedom as a manifestation of the sovereignty of the individual and his insistence on the value of this freedom, especially when it is threatened by autocratic ideology. Many recent titles on Propertius have tended to minimize or ignore this aspect of the poet’s work, concentrating instead on neo-formalism or Lacanian psychology. Johnson restores Propertius’ erotic creed and his politics to the core of his poetics and his career. He offers a vivid picture of the sociopolitical and erotic world of the late Roman Republic and the early years of the Empire which hatched Latin love elegy and allowed it to flourish. This study aims to redirect attention to the pleasures and energies Propertius provides that later generations of poets and readers discovered in and through him.

Latin Poets and Italian Gods / Elaine Fantham.  Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2009.  229pp.  Main Library PA6029.R4 F36 2009 : Latin Poets and Italian Gods reconstructs the response of Roman poets in the late republic and Augustan age to the rural cults of central Italy.

Leonidas and the kings of Sparta : mightiest warriors, fairest kingdom / Alfred S. Bradford.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Praeger, c2011.  251pp.  Main Library DF261.S8 B7 2011  : The Spartans have seemingly never gone out of interest, serving as mythic icons who exemplify fearlessness and an unwillingness to give in against impossible odds. Yet most are unaware of the true nature of the Spartan leaders—the fact that the kings maintained their position of power for 600 years by their willingness to compromise, even if it meant giving up some of their power, for example....Organized in a logical and chronological order, Leonidas and the Kings of Sparta: Mightiest Warriors, Fairest Kingdom describes the legendary origins of the dual kingship in Sparta, documents the many reigning eras of the kings, and then concludes with the time when the kingship was abolished six centuries later. The book examines the kings' roles in war and battle, in religion, in the social life of the city, and in formulating Spartan policy both at home and abroad. No other book on Sparta has concentrated on describing the role of the kings—and their absolutely essential contributions to Spartan society in general.

Life and Letters in the Ancient Greek World / John Muir. London ; New York : Routledge, 2009. 240pp. Main Library PA3042 .M85 2009 : From the first 'deadly signs' scratched on a wooden tablet instructing the recipient to kill the one who delivered it, to the letters of St Paul to the early Church, this book examines the range of letter writing in the Ancient Greek world. Containing extensive translated examples from both life and fiction, it provides a glimpse into the lives of both ordinary people and political life....This comprehensive study looks at personal and private letters, letters used in administration and government, letters used as vehicles for the dissemination of philosophy and religion, and letters which played a part in the development of several literary genres. The way in which letters were written and with what materials, how they were delivered, and how it is that, for certain limited periods and locations, so many of them have survived and how they were re-discovered....By placing these letters in their social, political and intellectual contexts, Life and Letters in the Ancient Greek World draws attention to both familiar topics, such as young soldiers writing home from basic training and the choice of flowers for a wedding, and more alien events, such as getting rid of baby girls and offhand attitudes to bereavement....This first guide in English to provide commentary on such a broad range of letters, will be essential reading for anyone interested in the Ancient Greek World.

Life in Ancient Rome / Joan P. Alcock.   Stroud, Gloucestershire : History Press, 2010.  192pp.  Main Library DG78 .A43 2010 : Ancient Rome, as a subject, has always attracted and fascinated people. The extent of its vast empire, much of it a result of its efficient military power, was such that many Romans believed that they governed the whole world, as it was then known, and that its was their right and destiny to do this. That empire has influenced later civilisations and its classical tradition can be seen in our own day in such diverse areas as language, customs, architecture and modes of thought. Visitors to Rome, throughout the centuries, have marvelled at its monuments and speculated on the lives of its people. This book, concentrating on life in the city of Rome in the late republic and the empire, also takes examples from Rome's provinces. Readers will have the opportunity to gain knowledge of people through Rome's government, administration, economy and trade. They can contemplate how ordinary Romans lived their daily lives - how they worshipped, travelled, fed themselves, entertained and were entertained. It cannot be denied that Roman society could be a cruel one especially to those who opposed it or lived on its fringes, but it tried to establish a just and reasonable form of government for the whole of its empire. Much of the evidence comes from the writings of those who lived in that society, one in which they were proud and honoured to be a citizen of Rome.

Lives of the Caesars / edited by Anthony A. Barrett.  Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2008.  322pp.  Main Library DG274 .L56 2008 : The Roman Empire represents one the most significant periods in European history, creating institutions that are still in one form or other with us today, and at its centre stood the emperors....Lives of the Caesars tells the stories of twelve of Rome’s most fascinating and influential rulers. Each chapter puts an emperor in the spotlight, from Augustus to Justinian, tracing the life of each of these dynamic but often flawed characters. The authors outline the unique features that allowed these great men to put their stamp on Roman civilization, and earn their places in history....Replete with illustrations, a timeline of Roman history, and a chart of dynasties, Lives of the Caesars is an engaging account of some of the most powerful leaders in the ancient world.

Lives of the Romans / Philip Matyszak and Joanne Berry.  London : Thames & Hudson, 2008.  304pp.  Main Library DG63 .M34 2008 : Matyszak (Cambridge Univ.) and Berry (Swansea Univ.) offer 100 biographical entries divided into five periods starting with 753 BCE. Only eight titles are listed for the general bibliography, but short listings of titles (usually one to three) appear with each entry in a "Further Reading" section. The volume explodes with illustrations, over half of which are in color. The entries are for well-known Romans, like Julius Caesar, and some not so well known, such as Eumachia, the first lady of Pompeii. This is not a book for scholars or researchers. Rather, it invites perusing with its beautiful illustrations, teaser captions that appear below the biographical names, the separation of the biographies into time periods, and the nonalphabetical ordering of the biographies within those time periods.    Lavishly illustrated with reproductions of portraits, sculptures, and Renaissance paintings of Roman scenes.

Living classics : Greece and Rome in contemporary poetry in English / edited by S.J. Harrison.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 346pp. Main Library PR508.C68 L58 2009    : This collection of essays explores the extensive use of Latin and Greek literary texts in a range of recent poetry written in English. It contains both contributions from poets, who include Tony Harrison, Seamus Heaney, and Michael Longley, talking about their uses of classical literature in their own work in lyric poetry and in theatre poetry, and essays from academic experts on the same topics. Living Classics asks why contemporary poets are returning to making versions of and allusions to Greek and Roman literature in their work, and interrogates the parallel interest of modern classical scholars in the contemporary reception of classical texts.

Livy / edited by Jane D. Chaplin and Christina S. Kraus. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009. 523pp. Main Library PA6459 .L58 2009 : The essays in this volume have been selected and arranged to provide students with an introduction to the historiographial study of the Roman historian Livy. All classics in their own right, the eighteen articles included here work together to present a picture of this creative and acutely observant historian writing during the Augustan principate. The editors have provided an introductory guide to previous Livian scholarship, which contextualizes each essay; each is also followed by an addendum providing further context and selected suggestions for further reading.

Lord Elgin and Ancient Greek Architecture : the Elgin Drawings at the British Museum / Luciana Gallo.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 344pp.  Fine Arts Library (4 West) NA2695.G7 E444 2009 : This book analyses the rich and remarkable collection of archaeological drawings, now housed in The British Museum, drawn in Greece by a team of architects and artists in the service of Lord Elgin during his ambassadorial expedition to the Levant (1799-1803). Luciana Gallo offers a new interpretation of Elgin's interest in antiquities and reveals the aims, innovative approach, and significant achievements of this specialised tour. She also reveals his contribution to the advancement of contemporary archaeological studies carried out by British and continental scholars, in connection to the search for original sources to promote Greek Revival architecture. This is the first time that the bulk of the Elgin Drawings collection in the British Museum has been published. The volume will thus serve as an indispensable guide to scholars and students of ancient Greek architecture and sculpture, as well as of nineteenth-century architectural revivalism.

Lords of the Sea : the Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy / John R. Hale. New York : Viking, 2009. 395pp. Main Library V37 .H355 2009 : A stirring history of the world's first dominant navy and the towering empire it built....The navy created by the people of Athens in ancient Greece was one of the finest fighting forces in the history of the world and the model for all other national navies to come. The Athenian navy built a civilization, empowered the worldÂ's first democracy, and led a band of ordinary citizens on a voyage of discovery that altered the course of history. Its defeat of the Persian fleet at Salamis in 480 BCE launched the Athenian Golden Age and preserved Greek freedom and culture for centuries. With Lords of the Sea, renowned archaeologist John Hale presents, for the first time, the definitive history of the epic battles, the indomitable ships, and the men—from extraordinary leaders to seductive rogues—who established AthensÂ's supremacy. With a scholarÂ's insight and a storytellerÂ's flair, Hale takes us on an illustrated tour of the heroes and their turbulent careers and far-flung expeditions and brings back to light a forgotten maritime empire and its majestic legacy.

Lost to the West : the Forgotten Byzantine Empire That Rescued Western Civilization / Lars Brownworth. New York : Crown Publishers, c2009. 329pp. Main Library DF552 .B76 2009 : In AD 476 the Roman Empire fell–or rather, its western half did. Its eastern half, which would come to be known as the Byzantine Empire, would endure and often flourish for another eleven centuries. Though its capital would move to Constantinople, its citizens referred to themselves as Roman for the entire duration of the empire’s existence. Indeed, so did its neighbors, allies, and enemies: When the Turkish Sultan Mehmet II conquered Constantinople in 1453, he took the title Caesar of Rome, placing himself in a direct line that led back to Augustus....For far too many otherwise historically savvy people today, the story of the Byzantine civilization is something of a void. Yet for more than a millennium, Byzantium reigned as the glittering seat of Christian civilization. When Europe fell into the Dark Ages, Byzantium held fast against Muslim expansion, keeping Christianity alive. When literacy all but vanished in the West, Byzantium made primary education available to both sexes. Students debated the merits of Plato and Aristotle and commonly committed the entirety of Homer’s Iliad to memory. Streams of wealth flowed into Constantinople, making possible unprecedented wonders of art and architecture, from fabulous jeweled mosaics and other iconography to the great church known as the Hagia Sophia that was a vision of heaven on earth. The dome of the Great Palace stood nearly two hundred feet high and stretched over four acres, and the city’s population was more than twenty times that of London’s....From Constantine, who founded his eponymous city in the year 330, to Constantine XI, who valiantly fought the empire’s final battle more than a thousand years later, the emperors who ruled Byzantium enacted a saga of political intrigue and conquest as astonishing as anything in recorded history. Lost to the West is replete with stories of assassination, mass mutilation and execution, sexual scheming, ruthless grasping for power, and clashing armies that soaked battlefields with the blood of slain warriors numbering in the tens of thousands....Still, it was Byzantium that preserved for us today the great gifts of the classical world. Of the 55,000 ancient Greek texts in existence today, some 40,000 were transmitted to us by Byzantine scribes. And it was the Byzantine Empire that shielded Western Europe from invasion until it was ready to take its own place at the center of the world stage. Filled with unforgettable stories of emperors, generals, and religious patriarchs, as well as fascinating glimpses into the life of the ordinary citizen, Lost to the West reveals how much we owe to this empire that was the equal of any in its achievements, appetites, and enduring legacy.

Makers of Ancient Strategy : From the Persian Wars to the Fall of Rome / edited and Introduced by Victor Davis Hanson.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2010.  Main Library U29 .M26 2010 : In this prequel to the now-classic Makers of Modern Strategy, Victor Davis Hanson, a leading scholar of ancient military history, gathers prominent thinkers to explore key facets of warfare, strategy, and foreign policy in the Greco-Roman world. From the Persian Wars to the final defense of the Roman Empire, Makers of Ancient Strategy demonstrates that the military thinking and policies of the ancient Greeks and Romans remain surprisingly relevant for understanding conflict in the modern world. The book reveals that much of the organized violence witnessed today--such as counterterrorism, urban fighting, insurgencies, preemptive war, and ethnic cleansing--has ample precedent in the classical era. The book examines the preemption and unilateralism used to instill democracy during Epaminondas's great invasion of the Peloponnesus in 369 BC, as well as the counterinsurgency and terrorism that characterized Rome's battles with insurgents such as Spartacus, Mithridates, and the Cilician pirates. The collection looks at the urban warfare that became increasingly common as more battles were fought within city walls, and follows the careful tactical strategies of statesmen as diverse as Pericles, Demosthenes, Alexander, Pyrrhus, Caesar, and Augustus. Makers of Ancient Strategy shows how Greco-Roman history sheds light on wars of every age. In addition to the editor, the contributors are David L. Berkey, Adrian Goldsworthy, Peter J. Heather, Tom Holland, Donald Kagan, John W. I. Lee, Susan Mattern, Barry Strauss, and Ian Worthington.

Marathon : how one battle changed Western civilization / Richard A. Billows.  New York : Overlook Duckworth, 2010.  304pp.  Main Library DF225.4 .B55 2010 : The Battle of Marathon in 490 B.C.E. is not only the most decisive event in the struggle between the Greek and the Persiansùshowing the Greeks the seemingly invincible Persians could indeed be defeatedùbut, arguably a defining event for Western civilization. John Stuart Mill famously proposed "the Battle of Marathon, even as an event in British history, is more important than the Battle of Hastings."...Richard A. Billows starts by providing a rich and, detailed overview of the Greek world at the time leading up to Marathon, including an examination of the Greek concept of "bestness" and a look at a prosperous, democratic Athens under Kleisthenes, which could, for the first time, deploy a citizen army in full panoply, to devasting effect against the lightly outfitted Persian infantry, despite its greater numbers. Key players include the Athenian general Miltiades, who, from the point of view of military history, was the first to utilize a totally outfitted hoplite phalanx to its fullest and develop the groundbreaking battle tactics in advance of the contest that provided the fulcrum for the Greeks' victory over King Darius's Persian army....The legend of the Greek messenger Philippides running twenty-six miles from Marathon to Athens with the news of the Greek victory is the inspiration for our modern-day marathon race, introduced at the Athens Olympic Games of 1896. Billows suggests, however, that the sources present it differently; with two runs-the messenger running 280 miles round-trip to Sparta to ask for aid, and the entire Greek army in full panoply, after fierce and exhausting fighting, marching at a rapid speed back to Athens in the event they were needed to defend its port....In this riveting work, Richard. A. Billows fully creates the atmosphere of the times, engrossingly captures the drama of the day of battle, and convincingly demonstrates that fhe flowering of classical Greek cultureùand the extraordinary influence it has had on Western cultureùwould almost certainly not have occurred had not the Athenians, "against the odds, defeated the Persians at Marathon.

Marcus Aurelius : A Life / Frank McLynn. Cambridge, MA : Da Capo Press, 2009. 684pp. Main Library DG297 .M35 2009 : Marcus Aurelius (121–180 AD) is one of the great figures of antiquity who still speaks to us today, more than two thousand years after his death. His Meditations has been compared by John Stuart Mill to the Sermon on the Mount. A guide to how we should live, it remains one of the most widely read books from the classical world. But Marcus Aurelius was much more than a philosopher. As emperor he stabilized the empire, issued numerous reform edicts, and defended the borders with success. His life itself represented the fulfillment of Plato’s famous dictum that mankind will prosper only when philosophers are rulers and rulers philosophers. Frank McLynn’s Marcus Aurelius, based on all available original sources, is the definitive and most vivid biography to date of this monumental historical figure.

Mark Antony's Heroes : How the Third Gallica Legion Saved an Apostle and Created an Emperor / Stephen Dando-Collins. Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley ; Chichester : John Wiley [distributor], 2007.  288pp.  Main Library DG271 .D36 2007 : In this riveting book, fourth in the author's definitive histories of the legions of ancient Rome, Stephen Dando-Collins draws on his three decades of painstaking research into the Roman military to present the enthralling story of the indefatigable 3rd Gallica Legion. Carefully culling material from classical sources, Mark Antony's Heroes elegantly weaves together a goldmine of little-known facts and influences on the legion's wars, campaigns, battles, skirmishes, speeches, and dialogues, as well as the men of the legions of Rome....By a.d. 69, the men of the 3rd Gallica Legion had gained a reputation as fearsome fighters, even among their fellow Romans. They had recently slaughtered nine thousand heavily armored Sarmatian cavalry on an icy battlefield south of the Danube. The unit made a name for itself under Mark Antony, only to see its early glory fade. Then, bloodied and withdrawn from the fray, it turned its fortunes around and put an emperor on the throne—marching, ironically, behind another man named Mark Antony. Yet these formidable warriors are also credited with saving St. Paul's life, not once, but three times, allowing him to spread the Word in Europe, which allowed Christianity to flourish.  During the first centuries b.c. and a.d., the 3rd Gallica Legion would defeat the dashing prince Pacorus and the opportunistic Quintus Labienus while retrieving Syria from the Parthians. It would allow King Herod to secure his throne in Judea and help Mark Antony survive his botched campaign against the Parthians. Thanks to the 3rd Gallica Legion, Corbulo regained Armenia for Rome, the Roxolani Sarmatians were thwarted from crossing the Danube for an entire century,two Jewish uprisings were put down, Vespasian became emperor of Rome, and the empire's stability and prosperity were restored. And, by saving the life of the Christian apostle Paul, the officers and men of the 3rd Gallica Legion gave the disciple as many as nine more years for his ministry....Covering some of the most graphic battle scenes contained in Dando-Collins's Roman legion books, Mark Antony's Heroes is an eye-opening account of the common men who helped make Rome great.

Martial's Epigrams : A Selection / translated and with an introduction by Garry Wills.  New York : Viking , c2008.  205pp.  Main Library PA6502 .W555 2008 : One of literature's greatest satirists, Martial earned his livelihood by excoriating the follies and vices of Roman society and its emperors, and set a pattern that satirists have admired across the ages. For the first time, readers can enjoy an English translation of these rhymes that does not sacrifice the cleverly constructed effects of Martial's short and shapely thrusts....The focus of Wills's selection is the poetic sport of using a few short lines to set up and then knock down an opponent: "Men flock to Thais / From North to South, / Yet she's a virgin -- / All but her mouth." Martial makes frequent statements, too, about his own art, whether he is addressing his poems (literally, like children going out into the world) or sneering at his poetic rivals as bad imitators and worse plagiarists. Epigram is a sport, and Wills gets into the game by not taking it too seriously, indulging in rhyme at the risk of sounding old fashioned because linguistic cleverness is as important to its wit as its economy. In the right setting, the most worthless thing becomes artful. Martial often turns to the image of amber:" A drop of amber hit an ant / While crawling past a tree / A brief and trifling thing preserved / For all eternity."

Masterpieces of Classical Art / Dyfri Williams. Austin, Tex. : University of Texas Press ; [London], : Published in co-operation with British Museum Press, c2009. 360pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection N5604.E6 L6 2009 : The British Museum has one of the finest collections of antiquities from ancient Greece and Rome outside of those countries. Masterpieces of Classical Art presents the highlights of the British Museum's collection for the first time in print. This beautiful volume displays 180 of the most important objects, including the most famous (such as the Parthenon sculptures), as well as a selection of lesser-known but equally significant pieces. Together, these works offer an overview of the whole of ancient Classical art....Each object is illustrated with a large color photograph, many of which were taken especially for this publication. The accompanying text unfolds the unique story and features of each object. The introduction offers a brief history of the vast collections of the Department of Greek and Roman Antiquities at the British Museum. Additional section introductions give a brief background for each period of Classical art.

Medical Analogy in Latin Satire / Sari Kivisto. New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009. 214pp. Main Library  PA3033 .K49 2009 : Offering fresh readings of numerous Neo-Latin texts, Medical Analogy in Latin Satire provides an introduction to medical issues in the tradition of Latin satire. The book explores what functions physical diseases and peculiarities had in early modern satires and how satire was considered as a form of healing instruction.

Meeting the Challenge : International Perspectives on the Teaching of Latin / edited by Bob Lister. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008. 168pp. Main Library Stacks PA2061 .M44 2008: "This collection of essays is based on papers given at a international conference on the teaching and learning of Latin in Cambridge (UK) in 2005".

Mithridates VI and the Pontic Kingdom / edited by Jakob Munk Højte. Aarhus ; Oakville, CT : Aarhus University Press, c2009. 375pp. Main Library Stacks DS156.P8 M658 2009 : Mithridates VI Eupator, the last king of Pontos, was undoubtedly one of the most prominent figures in the late Hellenistic period. Throughout his long reign (120-63 BC), the political and cultural landscape of Asia Minor and the Black Sea area was reshaped along new lines. The authors present new archaeological research and new interpretations of various aspects of Pontic society and its contacts with the Greek world and its eastern neighbours and investigate the background for the expansion of the Pontic Kingdom that eventually led to the confrontation with Rome.

The Moral Mirror of Roman Art / Rabun Taylor.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.  274pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NX650.M536 T39 2008 : This interdisciplinary study explores the meanings of mirrors and reflections in Roman art and society. When used as metaphors in Roman visual and literary discourses, mirrors had a strongly moral force, reflecting not random reality but rather a carefully filtered imagery with a didactic message. Focusing on examples found in mythical narrative, religious devotion, social interaction, and gender relations, Rabun Taylor demonstrates that reflections served as powerful symbols of personal change. Thus, in both art and literature, a reflection may be present during moments of a protagonist's inner or outer transformation.

Mycenaean Greece, Mediterranean commerce, and the formation of identity / Bryan E. Burns.  New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010. Main Library  HF375 .B87 2010 : The impact of long-distance exchange on the developing cultures of Bronze Age Greece has been a subject of debate since Schliemann's discovery of the Shaft Graves at Mycenae. In Mycenaean Greece, Mediterranean Commerce, and the Formation of Identity, Bryan E. Burns offers a new understanding of the effects of Mediterranean trade on Mycenaean Greece by considering the possibilities represented by the traded objects themselves in their Mycenaean contexts. A range of imported artifacts were distinguished by their precious material, uncommon style, and foreign writing, signaling their status as tangible evidence of connections beyond the Aegean. The consumption of these exotic symbols spread beyond the highest levels of society and functioned as symbols of external power sources. Burns argues that the consumption of exotic items thus enabled the formation of alternate identities and the resistance of palatial power.

Nero Caesar Augustus : Emperor of Rome / David Shotter. Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2008. 257pp. Main Library DG285 .S536 2008 : There is no shortage of recent biographies of Nero, the most outrageous of all Roman emperors, but Shotter's new book is useful for scholars as well as the intended readership of students and educated enthusiasts. The author (emer., Univ. of Lancaster), a noted scholar on Tacitus and Suetonius as well as Roman coinage, has penned an incisive, concise biography that captures the brutal, lurid politics of Nero and his court. Shotter has distilled his mastery of the sources, gained from decades of scholarly research, into the best introduction on Nero currently available. Even scholars will profit from Shotter's book, notably, the analysis of how Nero tentatively asserted his tyranny until the year 62, when he dispensed with advisors and ruled in his own right. Shotter judiciously uses coin iconography to support this thesis. Throughout, he displays a fine sense of the dynamics of imperial politics and offers ingenious explanations of two of the most perplexing events in Tacitus' account: the botched conspiracy of Messalina and Gaius Silus, and Nero's plot to murder his mother Agrippina. Two chapters summarize the diplomatic, institutional, and architectural aspects of the reign, but more scholarly studies are listed in Shotter's bibliography. Maps, plans, and plates are clear and well produced.

A New History of the Peloponnesian War  / Lawrence A. Tritle.  Chichester, West Sussex, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.  287pp.  DF229 .T74 2010  Online : This stimulating new study provides a narrative of the monumental conflict of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta, and examines the realities of the war and its effects on the average Athenian. It features (1) A penetrating new study of the Peloponnesian War between Athens and Sparta by an established scholar; (2) Offers an original interpretation of how and why the war began; (3) Weaves in the contemporary evidence of Aristophanes in order to give readers a new sense of how the war affected the individual; (4) Discusses the practicalities and realities of the war; (5) Examines the blossoming of culture and intellectual achievement in Athens despite the war; (6) Challenges the approach of Thucydides in his account of the war.

New Books, O-Q

Odes for victorious athletes / Pindar ; translated, with an introduction, by Anne Pippin Burnett.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010.  191pp.  Main Library PA4275.E5 B87 2010: You've just won the gold medal, what are you going to do? In Ancient Greece, your patron could throw a feast in your honor and have a poet write a hymn of praise to you. The great poet Pindar composed many such odes for victorious athletes. Esteemed classicist Anne Pippin Burnett presents a fresh and exuberant translation of Pindar's victory songs....The typical Pindaric ode reflects three separate moments: the instant of success in contest, the victory night with its disorderly revels, and the actual banquet of family and friends where the commissioned poem is being offered as entertainment. In their essential effect, these songs transform a physical triumph, as experienced by one man, into a sense of elation shared by his peers—men who have gathered to dine and to drink...Athletic odes were presented by small bands of dancing singers, influencing the audience with music and dance as well as by words. These translations respect the form of the originals, keeping the stanzas that shaped repeating melodies and danced figures and using rhythms meant to suggest performers in motion....Pindar's songs were meant to entertain and exalt groups of drinking men. These translations revive the confident excitement of their original performances

The Origins of Theater in Ancient Greece and Beyond : Rrom Ritual to Drama / edited by Eric Csapo, Margaret C. Miller.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.  440pp.  Main Library PA3203 .O75 2007 : This volume is the most thorough examination on the origins of Greek drama to date. It brings together seventeen essays by leading scholars in a variety of fields, including classical archaeology, iconography, cultural history, theatre history, philosophy, and religion. Though it primarily focuses up on ancient Greece, the volume includes comparative studies of ritual drama from ancient Egypt, Japan, and medieval Europe. Collectively, the essays show how the relationship of drama to ritual is one of the most controversial, complex, and multi-faceted questions of modern times. 

Out of Athens : the New Ancient Greeks / Page duBois.  Cambridge, MA : Harvard University Press, c2010.  236pp.  Main Library  PA3052 .D83 2010 : The iconoclast of Classics, Page duBois refuses to act as border patrol for a sometimes fiercely protected traditional discipline. Instead, she incorporates insights from postcolonial, psychoanalytic, and postmodern theories into her nuanced close readings of ancient Greek texts. Contemporary theory and ancient texts are mutually transformed in the process. Out of Athens sets ancient Greek culture next to the global ancient world of Vedic India, the Han dynasty in China, and the empires that survived Alexander the Great. DuBois also extends the range of classical studies through illuminating transhistorical juxtapositions—ancients brush elbows with Colette as she performs as a mummy at the Moulin Rouge, or with Kirk Douglas as he appears on the silver screen as Spartacus. She reads the poetry of Sappho, the tattooed body of the sage Epimenides, as well as Athenian tragedy, Buddhist texts set in a post-Alexandrian Bactria, alongside the work of Judith Butler and Alain Badiou. Page duBois establishes a daring agenda for the next generation of Classicists and, for both the intimate friend of Greek texts and the freshly arrived reader, makes ancient Greeks new.

The Oxford handbook of social relations in the Roman world / edited by Michael Peachin.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011.  738pp.  Main Library  HN10.R7 O94 2011 : The study of ancient Roman society blossomed in the 1970's. By now, we possess a very large literature on the individuals and groups that constituted the Roman community, and the various ways in which members of that community interacted. There is, however, no overview that takes into account the multifarious progress that has been made in the past thirty or forty years. The purpose of this handbook is twofold. On the one hand, it synthesizes what has heretofore been accomplished in this field. On the other hand, it attempts to configure the examination of Roman social relations in some new ways, and thereby indicates directions in which the discipline might proceed....The book opens with a general introduction that portrays the current state of the field, provides the background necessary for the following chapters, and then indicates some potential avenues for further study. A second introductory essay explains the chronological parameters of the handbook, and especially the importance for Roman society of the changes wrought by the shift from republic to empire. The main body of the book is divided into the following sections: (1) Mechanisms of Socialization (the family, primary education, rhetorical education, philosophical upbringing, law and social formation); (2) Mechanisms of Communication and Interaction (literature, inscriptions, papyri, coins); (3) Communal Contexts for Social Interaction (self-representation, public speaking, the Second Sophistic, courts of law, public entertainments, bathing); (4) Modes of Interpersonal Relations (honor, friendship, hospitality, dining, violence); (5) Societies within the Roman Community (collegia, the army, cultic societies, Judaism, Christianity); and (6) Marginalized Persons (slaves, women, children, prostitutes, actors and gladiators, magicians and astrologers, bandits, disabled people). The result is a unique and up-to-date survey of ancient Roman social relations.

The Peloponnesian War / Thucydides ; translated by Martin Hammond ; with an introduction and notes by P.J. Rhodes.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  708pp.  Main Library DF229.T5 H36 2009 : "The greatest historian that ever lived." Such was Macaulay's assessment of Thucydides (c. 460-400 BC) and his history of the Peloponnesian War, the momentous struggle between Athens and Sparta that lasted for twenty-seven years from 431 to 404 BC, involved virtually the whole of the Greek world, and ended in the fall of Athens. A participant in the war himself, Thucydides brings to his history an awesome intellect, brilliant narrative, and penetrating analysis of the nature of power, as it affects both states and individuals. Of the prose writers of the ancient world, Thucydides has had more lasting influence on western thought than all but Plato and Aristotle. This new edition combines a masterly new translation by Martin Hammond with comprehensive supporting material, including summaries of individual Books; textual notes; a comprehensive analytical index; an appendix on weights, measures and distances, money, and calendars; ten maps; an up-to-date bibliography; and an illuminating introduction by P.J. Rhodes.

The Peloponnesian War : Athens, Sparta, and the Struggle for Greece / Nigel Bagnall.  New York : Thomas Dunne Books, 2006.  318pp.  Main Library DF229 .B34 2006 : The Peloponnesian War, the epic struggle between Athens and Sparta, occupies a vital part in military history because of the enormous military and political changes it inspired. In this brilliant book, Sir Nigel Bagnall sets out to analyze and clarify the war, describing in compelling detail the events that led up to it.  His meticulous attention to historical context offers a refreshing contrast to traditional accounts....The conflict lasted from 431 to 404 B.C., until the confederation led by Sparta finally conquered Athens and her allies. Bagnall dissects the complex relationship between the two states and closely studies their political conduct in the run-up to war, offering a riveting account of the strategy and tactics involved.
He also outlines its innovations and lessons, which would have enormous military repercussions for future generations. These include the importance of having clear politico-strategic objectives, the interplay of maritime and land operations, and the problems of achieving cohesion in an alliance in which all the participants see themselves as fellow citizens. 

Persius and Juvenal / edited by Maria Plaza.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  559pp.  Main Library PA6448 .P47 2009 : The last decades have seen a lively interest in Roman verse satire, and this collection of essays introduces the reader to the best of modern critical writing on Persius and Juvenal. The eight articles on Persius range from detailed analyses of his fine technique to readings inspired by theoretical approaches such as New Historicism, Reader-Response Criticism, and Dialogics. The nine selections on Juvenal focus upon the pivotal question in modern Juvenalian criticism: how serious is the poet when he voices his appallingly misogynist, homophobic, and xenophobic moralism? The contributors challenge the straightforward equivalence of author and speaker in a variety of ways, and they also point up the technical aspects of Juvenal's art. Three papers have been newly translated for this volume, and all Latin quotations are also given in English. A specially written Introduction provides a useful conspectus of recent scholarship.

Philip II of Macedonia / Ian Worthington.  New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c2008.  303pp.  Main Library DF233.8.P59 W67 2008 : Alexander the Great is probably the most famous ruler of antiquity, and his spectacular conquests are recounted often in books and films. But what of his father, Philip II, who united Macedonia, created the best army in the world at the time, and conquered and annexed Greece? This landmark biography is the first to bring Philip to life, exploring the details of his life and legacy and demonstrating that his achievements were so remarkable that it can be argued they outshone those of his more famous son. Without Philip, Greek history would have been entirely different....Taking into account recent archaeological discoveries and reinterpreting ancient literary records, Ian Worthington brings to light Philip’s political, economic, military, social, and cultural accomplishments. He reveals the full repertoire of the king’s tactics, including several polygamous diplomatic marriages, deceit, bribery, military force, and a knack for playing off enemies against one another. The author also inquires into the king’s influences, motives, and aims, and in particular his turbulent, unraveling relationship with Alexander, which may have ended in murder. Philip became in many ways the first modern regent of the ancient world, and this book places him where he properly belongs: firmly at the center stage of Greek history.

Pliny's Women : Constructing Virtue and Creating Identity in the Roman World / Jacqueline M. Carlon.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  270pp.  Main Library HQ1136 .C367 2009 : Pliny's Women offers a comprehensive consideration of the many women who appear in the letters of Pliny the Younger. Combining detailed prosopography with close literary analysis, Jacqueline Carlon examines the identities of the women whom Pliny includes and how they and the men with whom they are associated contribute both to this presentation of exemplary Romans and particularly to his own self-promotion. Virtually all of the named women in Pliny's nine-book corpus are considered. They form six distinct groups: those associated with opposition to the principate; the family of Pliny's mentor, Corellius Rufus; his own family members; women involved in testamentary disputes; ideal wives; and women of unseemly character. Detailed analysis of each letter mentioning women includes the identity of its recipient and everyone named within, its disposition within the collection, Pliny's language and style, and its significance to our perception of the changing social fabric of the early principate.

The Poison King : the Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy / Adrienne Mayor.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.  448pp.  Main Library DS156.P8 M39 2010 : Machiavelli praised his military genius. European royalty sought out his secret elixir against poison. His life inspired Mozart's first opera, while for centuries poets and playwrights recited bloody, romantic tales of his victories, defeats, intrigues, concubines, and mysterious death. But until now no modern historian has recounted the full story of Mithradates, the ruthless king and visionary rebel who challenged the power of Rome in the first century BC. In this richly illustrated book--the first biography of Mithradates in fifty years--Adrienne Mayor combines a storyteller's gifts with the most recent archaeological and scientific discoveries to tell the tale of Mithradates as it has never been told before.The Poison King describes a life brimming with spectacle and excitement. Claiming Alexander the Great and Darius of Persia as ancestors, Mithradates inherited a wealthy Black Sea kingdom at age 14 after his mother poisoned his father. He fled into exile and returned in triumph to become a ruler of superb intelligence and fierce ambition. Hailed as a savior by his followers and feared as a second Hannibal by his enemies, he envisioned a grand Eastern empire to rival Rome. After massacring 80,000 Roman citizens in 88 BC, he seized Greece and modern-day Turkey. Fighting some of the most spectacular battles in ancient history, he dragged Rome into a long round of wars and threatened to invade Italy itself. His uncanny ability to elude capture and surge back after devastating losses unnerved the Romans, while his mastery of poisons allowed him to foil assassination attempts and eliminate rivals.The Poison King is a gripping account of one of Rome's most relentless but least understood foes.

Politeness and Politics in Cicero's Letters / Jon Hall.  Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  275pp.  Main Library PA6350 .H35 2009 : Politeness and Politics in Cicero's Letters presents a fresh examination of the letters exchanged between Cicero and correspondents, such as Pompey, Julius Caesar and Mark Antony during the final turbulent decades of the Roman Republic. Drawing upon sociolinguistic theories of politeness, it argues that formal relationships between powerful members of the elite were constrained by distinct conventions of courtesy and etiquette. By examining in detail these linguistic conventions of politeness, Jon Hall presents new insights into the social manners that shaped aristocratic relationships....The book begins with a discussion of the role of letter-writing within the Roman aristocracy and the use of linguistic politeness to convey respect to fellow members of the elite. Hall then analyzes the deployment of conventionalized expressions of affection and goodwill to cultivate alliances with ambitious rivals and the diplomatic exploitation of "polite fictions" at times of political tension. The book also explores the strategies of politeness employed by Cicero and his correspondents when making requests and dispensing advice, and when engaging in epistolary disagreements. (His exchanges with Appius Claudius Pulcher, Munatius Plancus, and Mark Antony receive particular emphasis.) Its detailed analysis of specific letters places the reader at the very heart of Late Republican political negotiations and provides a new critical approach to Latin epistolography.

Politics and Society in Ancient Greece / Nicholas F. Jones.  Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008.  167pp.  Main Library JC73 .J66 2008 : Western democracies often trace their political roots back to Ancient Greece. While politics today may seem the dusty domain of lawmakers and pundits, in the classical era virtually no aspect of life was beyond its reach. "Political life" was not limited to acts of a legislature, magistrates, and the courts but routinely included the activities of social clubs, the patronage system, and expression through literature, art, and architecture. Through these varied means, even non-enfranchised groups (such as women and non-citizens) gained entry into a wider democratic process.

The Politics of Munificence in the Roman Empire : Citizens, Elites and Benefactors in Asia Minor / Arjan Zuiderhoek. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 186pp. Main Library DF240 .Z85 2009 : In the first two centuries AD, the eastern Roman provinces experienced a proliferation of elite public generosity unmatched in their previous or later history. In this study, Arjan Zuiderhoek attempts to answer the question why this should have been so. Focusing on Roman Asia Minor, he argues that the surge in elite public giving was not caused by the weak economic and financial position of the provincial cities, as has often been maintained, but by social and political developments and tensions within the Greek cities created by their integration into the Roman imperial system. As disparities of wealth and power within imperial polis society continued to widen, the exchange of gifts for honours between elite and non-elite citizens proved an excellent political mechanism for deflecting social tensions away from open conflicts towards communal celebrations of shared citizenship and the legitimation of power in the cities.

Pompeii : the Life of a Roman Town / Mary Beard.  London : Profile, 2008.  Main Library DG70.P7 B44 2008 : The trouble with digging up the ancient past is that only the best and the biggest stuff tends to get left behind. Not so in Pompeii. In this brilliant portrait of the “life of a Roman town”, Mary Beard uses the relics buried by the eruption of AD79 (the fish-weighing scales and flour mills, the gladiators' helmets and grafitti) to bring everyday Roman culture alive.  For an extensive online review from the Times Online, click here. Another from the Independent.

Pompeii : the Living City / Alex Butterworth & Ray Laurence. New York : St. Martin's Press, 2006. 354pp. Main Library DG70.P7 B93 2006 : The ash of Mt. Vesuvius preserves a living record of the complex and exhilarating society it instantly obliterated two thousand years ago. In this highly readable, lavishly illustrated book, Butterworth and Laurence marshall cutting-edge archaeological reconstructions and a vibrant historical tradition dating to Pliny and Tacitus; they present a richly textured portrait of a society not altogether unlike ours, composed of individuals ordinary and extraordinary who pursued commerce, politics, family and pleasure in the shadow of a killer volcano.  Deeply resonant in a world still at the mercy of natural disaster, Pompeii recreates life as experienced in the city, and those frantic, awful hours in AD 79 that wiped the bustling city from the face of the earth.

Popular Culture in Ancient Rome / Jerry Toner.  Cambridge ; Malden, MA : Polity, 2009.  253pp.  Main Library DG78 .T66 2009 : The mass of the Roman people constituted well over 90% of the population. Much ancient history, however, has focused on the lives, politics and culture of the minority elite. This book helps redress the balance by focusing on the non-elite in the Roman world. It builds a vivid account of the everyday lives of the masses, including their social and family life, health, leisure and religious beliefs, and the ways in which their popular culture resisted the domination of the ruling elite....The book highlights previously under-considered aspects of popular culture of the period to give a fuller picture. It is the first book to take fully into account the level of mental health: given the physical and social environment that most people faced, their overall mental health mirrored their poor physical health. It also reveals fascinating details about the ways in which people solved problems, turning frequently to oracles for advice and guidance when confronted by difficulties. Our understanding of the non-elite world is further enriched through the depiction of sensory dimensions: Toner illustrates how attitudes to smell, touch, and noise all varied with social status and created conflict, and how the emperors tried to resolve these disputes as part of their regeneration of urban life....Popular Culture in Ancient Rome offers a rich and accessible introduction to the usefulness of the notion of popular culture in studying the ancient world and will be enjoyed by students and general readers alike.

Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire / Teresa Morgan.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.  380pp.  Main Library BJ221 .M67 2007 : Morality is one of the fundamental structures of any society, enabling complex groups to form, negotiate their internal differences and persist through time. In the first book-length study of Roman popular morality, Dr Morgan argues that we can recover much of the moral thinking of people across the Empire. Her study draws on proverbs, fables, exemplary stories and gnomic quotations, to explore how morality worked as a system for Roman society as a whole and in individual lives. She examines the range of ideas and practices and their relative importance, as well as questions of authority and the relationship with high philosophy and the ethical vocabulary of documents and inscriptions. The Roman Empire incorporated numerous overlapping groups, whose ideas varied according to social status, geography, gender and many other factors. Nevertheless it could and did hold together as an ethical community, which was a significant factor in its socio-political success.

Pots & Plays : Interactions Between Tragedy and Greek Vase-Painting of the Fourth Century B.C. / Oliver Taplin.  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2007.  309pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NK4645 .T377 2007  : This interdisciplinary study opens up a fascinating interaction between art and theater. It shows how the mythological vase-paintings of fourth-century B.C. Greeks, especially those settled in southern Italy, are more meaningful for those who had seen the myths enacted in the popular new medium of tragedy. The pots do not, it is argued, show the plays as such, but gain depth and complexity from recalling the tragic vision of particular stage-versions, including those of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and, above all, Euripides. Of some 300 relevant vases, 109 are reproduced and accompanied by a picture-by-picture discussion. Nearly half of these were discovered since 1970, and most have not been thoroughly discussed in relation to tragedy before. The vases are organized by playwright and by the tragedy invoked. Apart from its challenging ideas about the significance of Tragedy for the Greeks, this book supplies a rich and unprecedented resource from a neglected treasury of painting.

Power and Eroticism in Imperial Rome / Caroline Vout.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007. 285pp.  Main Library DG271 .V68 2007 : The relationships between Roman emperors and their objects of desire, male and female, are well attested. The salacious nature of this evidence means that it is often omitted from mainstream historical inquiry. Yet that is to underestimate the importance of 'gossip' and the act of thinking about an emperor's private life. In this book Dr Vout takes the reader from Rome, and Martial's and Statius' poems about Domitian's favourite eunuch, to Antioch and dialogues in praise of Lucius Verus' mistress, to the widespread visual commemoration and cult of Hadrian's young male lover, Antinous. She explores not the relationships themselves but rather the implications of their description. Such description provides a template with which to examine the relationship between emperor and subject, gods and mortals, East and West, centre and periphery. It thus contributes to the fields of imperial representation, court society and the imperial cult.

Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out.  If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

New Books, R

Reading Homer : Film and Text / edited by Kostas Myrsiades.  Madison [NJ] : Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, c2009.  258pp.  Main Library PA4037.A5 R43 2009 : Delightful, amazing, and full of surprising insights, this modest study includes nine new essays on both old Homeric questions (key themes and scenes) and modern concerns: e.g., it offers analyses of Wolfgang Petersen's blockbuster film Troy (2004) and other American films. Issues of orality, historicity, and Hellenism are dealt with, as are matters relating to gift-giving and the sacred law of hospitality. One essay probes and explicates the famous recognition scenes in the Odyssey (books 19 and 23). Two others examine the rhetorical sway of conversation and speech in the Iliad and the Odyssey. The careful scrutiny of Troy looks at how the film rewrites Homer audaciously and even redefines Homeric heroism. One contributor explores the charming It's a Wonderful Life as a skillful reworking of the Odyssey (Clarence the angel as Athena ...). The book closes with an essay that compares the Iliad and the Odyssey with Henry King's film The Gunfighter (1950) in terms of the warrior's glory, self-recognition, and homecoming. The volume would have been more user friendly had Myrsiades fused the bibliographies at the end of each essay into one full grouping.

Reading Roman Comedy : Poetics and Playfulness in Plautus and Terence / Alison Sharrock.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  321pp.  Main Library PA6602 .S53 2009 :  For many years the domain of specialists in early Latin, in complex metres, and in the reconstruction of texts, Roman comedy has only recently begun to establish itself in the mainstream of Classical literary criticism. Where most recent books stress the original performance as the primary location for the encountering of the plays, this book finds the locus of meaning and appreciation in the activity of a reader, albeit one whose manner of reading necessarily involves the imaginative reconstruction of performance. The texts are treated, and celebrated, as literary devices, with programmatic beginnings, middles, ends, and intertexts. All the extant plays of Plautus and Terence have at least a bit part in this book, which seeks to expose the authors' fabulous artificiality and artifice, while playing along with their differing but interrelated poses of generic humility.

Recognizing Persius / Kenneth J. Reckford.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2009.  240pp.  Main Library PA6556 R43 2009 : Recognizing Persius is a passionate and in-depth exploration of the libellus--or little book--of six Latin satires left by the Roman satirical writer Persius when he died in AD 62 at the age of twenty-seven. In this comprehensive and reflectively personal book, Kenneth Reckford fleshes out the primary importance of this mysterious and idiosyncratic writer. Reckford emphasizes the dramatic power and excitement of Persius's satires--works that normally would have been recited before a reclining, feasting audience. In highlighting the satires' remarkable honesty, Reckford shows how Persius converted Roman satire into a vehicle of self-exploration and self-challenge that remains relevant to readers today.The book explores the foundations of Roman satire as a performance genre: from the dinner-party recitals of Lucilius, the founder of the genre, through Horace, to Persius's more intense and inward dramatic monologues. Reckford argues that despite satire's significant public function, Persius wrote his pieces first and mainly for himself. Reckford also provides the context for Persius's life and work: his social responsibilities as a landowner; the interplay between his life, his Stoic philosophy, and his art; and finally, his incomplete struggle to become an honest and decent human being. Bringing the modern reader to a closer and more nuanced acquaintance with Persius's work, Recognizing Persius reinstates him to the ranks of the first-rate satirists, alongside Horace and Juvenal.

Reflections of Romanity : discourses of subjectivity in Imperial Rome / Richard Alston and Efrossini Spentzou.  Columbus : Ohio State University Press, c2011.  247pp.  Main Library PA6003 .A45 2011 : Challenges and provokes debate about how we understand the Roman world, and ourselves, by engagement with the early imperial literature of the mid-first to early second-century CE. Alston and Spentzou explore Roman subjectivity to illuminate a society whose fragmentation presented considerable challenges to contemporary thinkers. These members of the elite and intellectual classes faced complex ideological choices in relation to how they could define themselves in relation to imperial society....Reflections of Romanity draws on present-day reflections on selfhood while at the same time uncovering processes of self-analysis, notably by tracing individuals’ reactions to moments of crisis or uncertainty. Thus it sets up a dialogue between the ancient texts it discusses, including the epics of Lucan and Statius, the letters of the Younger Pliny, Silius Italicus’ Punica, and Tacitus’ historical writings, and works of the modern period. Given the importance of classical thinking about the self in modern thought, this book addresses both a classical and a philosophical/literary critical audience.

Remembering the Roman People : Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature / T.P. Wiseman. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009.  271pp.  Main Library DG250 .W575 2009 : In the Roman republic, only the People could pass laws, only the People could elect politicians to office, and the very word respublica meant 'the People's business'. So why is it always assumed that the republic was an oligarchy? The main reason is that most of what we know about it we know from Cicero, a great man and a great writer, but also an active right-wing politician who took it for granted that what was good for a small minority of self-styled 'best people' (optimates) was good for the republic as a whole. T. P. Wiseman interprets the last century of the republic on the assumption that the People had a coherent political ideology of its own, and that the optimates, with their belief in justified murder, were responsible for the breakdown of the republic in civil war.

Res Gestae Divi Augusti : Text, Translation, and Commentary / Alison E. Cooley.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  317pp. Main Library DG279 .A413 2009 : At the end of his life the emperor Augustus wrote an account of his achievements in which he reviewed his rise to power, his conquest of the world and his unparalleled generosity towards his subjects. This edition provides a new text, translation and detailed commentary - the first substantial one in English for more than four decades - which is suitable for use with students of all levels. The commentary deals with linguistic, stylistic and historical matters. It elucidates how Augustus understood his role in Roman society, and how he wished to be remembered by posterity; and it sets this picture that emerges from the Res Gestae into the context of the emergence both of a new visual language and of an official set of expressions. The book also includes illustrations in order to demonstrate how the Augustan era witnessed the rise of a whole new visual language.

Rhetorical Exercises From Late Antiquity : a Translation of Choricius of Gaza's Preliminary Talks and Declamations / Choricius of Gaza ; with an epilogue on Choricius' reception in Byzantium ; edited by Robert J. Penella ; with Eugenio Amato ... [et al.].  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  323pp.  Main Library PA5303 .C613 2009 : The first translation, produced by a team of eight scholars, of the Declamations and Preliminary Talks of the sixth-century sophist Choricius of Gaza. Declamations, deliberative or judicial orations on fictitious themes, were the fundamental advanced exercises of the rhetorical schools of the Roman Empire, of interest also to audiences outside the schools. Some of Choricius' declamations are on generic themes (e.g. a tyrannicide, a war-hero), while others are based on specific motifs from Homeric times or from classical Greek history. The Preliminary Talks were typical prefaces to orations of all kinds. This volume also contains a detailed study of Choricius' reception in Byzantium and Renaissance Italy. It will be of interest to students of late antiquity, ancient rhetoric, and ancient education.

The Roman Amphitheatre : From Its Origins to the Colosseum / Katherine E. Welch. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007.  353pp. Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NA313 .W45 2007 : Analyzing the evolution of the Roman amphitheatre as an architectural form, Katherine Welch addresses the critical period in the history of this building type. She covers the origins and dissemination under the Republic (from the third to first centuries BC); monumentalization as an architectural form under Augustus; and canonization as a building type with the Colosseum (AD 80). The study then focuses on the reception of the amphitheatre in the Greek East, a part of the Empire strongly divided about the new realities of Roman rule.

The Roman Clan : the Gens From Ancient Ideology to Modern Anthropology / C.J. Smith.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.  393pp.  Main Library HQ511 .S65 2006 : The gens or 'clan', a key social formation in archaic Rome, has given rise to considerable interpretative problems for modern scholarship. In this comprehensive exploration of the subject, C.J. Smith examines the mismatch between the ancient evidence and modern interpretative models influenced by social anthropology and political theory. He offers a detailed comparison of the gens with the Attic genos and illustrates, for the first time, how recent changes in the way we understand the genos may impact upon our understanding of Roman history. This significant work makes an important contribution not only to the study of archaic Rome, but also to the history of ideas.

Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture / edited by Jonathan Edmondson and Alison Keith.  Toronto ; Buffalo : University of Toronto Press, c2008.  370pp.  Main Library GT555 .R66 2008 : Investigates the social symbolism and cultural poetics of dress in the ancient Roman world in the period from 200 BCE-400 CE. Editors Jonathan Edmondson and Alison Keith and the contributors to this volume explore the diffusion of Roman dress protocols at Rome and in the Roman imperial context by looking at Rome's North African provinces in particular, a focus that previous studies have overlooked or dealt with only in passing. Another unique aspect of this collection is that it goes beyond the male elite to address a wider spectrum of Roman society. Chapters deal with such topics as masculine attire, strategies for self-expression for Roman women within a dress code prescribed by a patriarchal culture, and the complex dynamics of dress in imperial Roman culture, both literary and artistic. This volume further investigates the literary, legal, and iconographic evidence to provide anthropologically-informed readings of Roman clothing....This collection of original essays employs a range of methodological approaches - historical, literary critical, philological, art historical, sociological and anthropological - to offer a thorough discussion of one of the most central issues in Roman culture.

Roman Eyes : Visuality & Subjectivity in Art & Text / Jaś Elsner.  Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2007.  350pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NX448.5 .E47 2007 : In Roman Eyes, Jas Elsner seeks to understand the multiple ways that art in ancient Rome formulated the very conditions for its own viewing, and as a result was complicit in the construction of subjectivity in the Roman Empire. Elsner draws upon a wide variety of visual material, from sculpture and wall paintings to coins and terra-cotta statuettes. He examines the different contexts in which images were used, from the religious to the voyeuristic, from the domestic to the subversive. He reads images alongside and against the rich literary tradition of the Greco-Roman world, including travel writing, prose fiction, satire, poetry, mythology, and pilgrimage accounts. The astonishing picture that emerges reveals the mindsets Romans had when they viewed art--their preoccupations and theories, their cultural biases and loosely held beliefs.Roman Eyes is not a history of official public art--the monumental sculptures, arches, and buildings we typically associate with ancient Rome, and that tend to dominate the field. Rather, Elsner looks at smaller objects used or displayed in private settings and closed religious rituals, including tapestries, ivories, altars, jewelry, and even silverware. In many cases, he focuses on works of art that no longer exist, providing a rare window into the aesthetic and religious lives of the ancient Romans.

The Roman Imperial Mausolem in Late Antiquity / Mark J. Johnson.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009.  296pp.  Main Library DG272 .J64 2009 : This book is the first comprehensive study of the mausolea of the later Roman emperors. Constructed between ca. AD 244 and 450 and bridging the transition from paganism to Christianity within the empire, these important buildings shared a common design, that of domed rotunda. Mark Johnson examines the symbolism and function of the mausolea, demonstrating for the first time that these monuments served as temples and shrines to the divinized emperors. Through an examination of literary sources and the archaeological record, he identifies which buildings were built as imperial tombs. Each building is examined to determine its place in the development of the type as well as for its unique features within the group. Recognizing the strong relationship between the mausolea built for pagan and Christian emperors, Johnson also analyzes their important differences.

Roman Manliness : Virtus and the Roman Republic / Myles McDonnell.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.  481pp.  Main Library HQ1090.7.R6 M33 2006 : Recent studies of ancient Roman masculinities have concentrated on the private aspects of the subject, particularly sexuality, and have drawn conclusions from a narrow field of reference, usually rhetorical practice. In contrast, this book examines the public and the most important aspect of Roman masculinity: Manliness as represented by the concept of "virtus". Using traditional historical, philological, and archaeological analysis, combined with socio-linguistics and gender studies, it presents a comprehensive picture of how Roman manliness developed from the middle to the late Republic period.

Roman Republics / Harriet I. Flower. Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2010.  204pp.  Main Library DG231 .F567 2010 : From the Renaissance to today, the idea that the Roman Republic lasted more than 450 years--persisting unbroken from the late sixth century to the mid-first century BC--has profoundly shaped how Roman history is understood, how the ultimate failure of Roman republicanism is explained, and how republicanism itself is defined. In Roman Republics, Harriet Flower argues for a completely new interpretation of republican chronology. Radically challenging the traditional picture of a single monolithic republic, she argues that there were multiple republics, each with its own clearly distinguishable strengths and weaknesses. While classicists have long recognized that the Roman Republic changed and evolved over time, Flower is the first to mount a serious argument against the idea of republican continuity that has been fundamental to modern historical study. By showing that the Romans created a series of republics, she reveals that there was much more change--and much less continuity--over the republican period than has previously been assumed. In clear and elegant prose, Roman Republics provides not only a reevaluation of one of the most important periods in western history but also a brief yet nuanced survey of Roman political life from archaic times to the end of the republican era.

The Roman Triumph / Mary Beard.  Cambridge, Mass. : Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2007.  434pp. Main Library DG89 .B43 2007 : It followed every major military victory in ancient Rome: the successful general drove through the streets to the temple of Jupiter on the Capitoline Hill; behind him streamed his raucous soldiers; in front were his most glamorous prisoners, as well as the booty he'd captured, from enemy ships and precious statues to plants and animals from the conquered territory. Occasionally there was so much on display that the show lasted two or three days....A radical reexamination of this most extraordinary of ancient ceremonies, this book explores the magnificence of the Roman triumph--but also its darker side. What did it mean when the axle broke under Julius Caesar's chariot? Or when Pompey's elephants got stuck trying to squeeze through an arch? Or when exotic or pathetic prisoners stole the general's show? And what are the implications of the Roman triumph, as a celebration of imperialism and military might, for questions about military power and "victory" in our own day? The triumph, Mary Beard contends, prompted the Romans to question as well as celebrate military glory....Her richly illustrated work is a testament to the profound importance of the triumph in Roman culture--and for monarchs, dynasts and generals ever since. But how can we re-create the ceremony as it was celebrated in Rome? How can we piece together its elusive traces in art and literature? Beard addresses these questions, opening a window on the intriguing process of sifting through and making sense of what constitutes "history."

The Roman wedding : ritual and meaning in antiquity / Karen K. Hersch. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  341pp.  Main Library GT2752.R65 H47 2010 : The wedding ritual of the ancient Romans provides a crucial key to understanding their remarkable civilization. The intriguing ceremony represented the starting point of a Roman family as well as a Roman girl's transition to womanhood. This is the first book-length examination of Roman wedding ritual. Drawing on literary, legal, historical, antiquarian, and artistic evidence of Roman nuptials from the end of the Republic through the early Empire (from ca. 200 BC to 200 AD), Karen Hersch shows how the Roman wedding expressed the ideals and norms of an ancient people. Her book is an invaluable tool for Roman social historians interested in how ideas of gender, law, religion, and tradition are interwoven into the wedding ceremony of every culture"

The Romans in the age of Augustus  / Andrew Lintott.  Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.  198pp.  DG279 .L48 2010  Online : Begins by reviewing briefly the growth of the Roman empire and the crisis of the late republic that led to its overthrow and the rise of emperors. Then he focuses on life during the long reign of Augustus from 30 BC to 14 AD from the angles of the emperor and his people; town and country; customs, culture, and ideas; and armed services and the frontiers.

Rome and the Nomads : the Pontic-Danubian Realm in Antiquity / Roger Batty. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2007.  652pp.  Main Library DJK46 .B38 2007 : In this comprehensive illustrated study, Roger Batty examines the historical importance of migration and the pastoral economy in Eastern Europe during ancient and early medieval times, with an emphasis on the early period of Roman rule. Across a wide geographical area, from the Ukraine to the shores of the Aegean, the interaction of imperial rulers and migrating steppe nomads both with each other and with the indigenous farmers and herdsmen, forms a central strand of European history. Batty uses both textual and archaeological evidence to establish a clear picture of life in the region. In explaining the historical development of the area in antiquity, whether in the Roman period or afterwards, he investigates the economic choices available to, and the ideas espoused by, both larger and smaller social groups. Historically important but unrecognized structures and trends are all given prominence over the more temporary initiatives of centralizing powers.

Rome : Day One / Andrea Carandini ; translated by Stephen Sartarelli.  Princeton : Princeton University Press, c2011. 172pp.  Main Library DG233.3 .C37513 2011 : Andrea Carandini's archaeological discoveries and controversial theories about ancient Rome have made international headlines over the past few decades. In this book, he presents his most important findings and ideas, including the argument that there really was a Romulus--a first king of Rome--who founded the city in the mid-eighth century BC, making it the world's first city-state, as well as its most influential. Rome: Day One makes a powerful and provocative case that Rome was established in a one-day ceremony, and that Rome's first day was also Western civilization's....Historians tell us that there is no more reason to believe that Rome was actually established by Romulus than there is to believe that he was suckled by a she-wolf. But Carandini, drawing on his own excavations as well as historical and literary sources, argues that the core of Rome's founding myth is not purely mythical. In this illustrated account, he makes the case that a king whose name might have been Romulus founded Rome one April 21st in the mid-eighth century BC, most likely in a ceremony in which a white bull and cow pulled a plow to trace the position of a wall marking the blessed soil of the new city. This ceremony establishing the Palatine Wall, which Carandini discovered, inaugurated the political life of a city that, through its later empire, would influence much of the world....Uncovering the birth of a city that gave birth to a world, Rome: Day One reveals as never before a truly epochal event.

Rome : Empire of the Eagles (753 BC - AD 476 ) / Neil Faulkner.  Harlow, England ; New York : Pearson Longman, 2008.  344pp.  Main Library DG270 .F38 2008 : The Roman Empire is widely admired as a model of civilisation. In this compelling new study, Neil Faulkner argues that it was, on the contrary, a ruthless system of robbery and violence. War was used to enrich the state, the imperial ruling classes and favoured client groups. In the process millions of people were killed or enslaved....Within the empire, the state and the landowning elite creamed off taxes and rents from the countryside to fund their army, their towns, and their villas. The mass of people – slaves, serfs, poor peasants – were the victims of the exploitation that made the empire possible. This system, riddled with tension and latent conflict, contained the seeds of its own eventual collapse from the outset.

Rome's Cultural Revolution / Andrew Wallace-Hadrill.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2008.  502pp.  Main Library DG77 .W35 2008 : The period of Rome's imperial expansion, the late Republic and early Empire, saw transformations of its society, culture and identity. Drawing equally on archaeological and literary evidence, this book offers an original and provocative interpretation of these changes. Moving from recent debates about colonialism and cultural identity, both in the Roman world and more broadly, and challenging the traditional picture of 'Romanization' and 'Hellenization', it offers instead a model of overlapping cultural identities in dialogue with one another. It attributes a central role to cultural change in the process of redefinition of Roman identity, represented politically by the crisis of the Republican system and the establishment of the new Augustan order. Whether or not it is right to see these changes as 'revolutionary', they involve a profound transformation of Roman life and identity, one that lies at the heart of understanding the nature of the Roman Empire.

Rome's Gothic Wars : From the Third Century to Alaric / Michael Kulikowski. New York : Cambridge University Press, 2007. 225pp.  Main Library DG312 .K85 2007 : Late in August 410, Rome was starving, its residents were turning on one another, and, to make matters worse, the Gothic army camped at Rome's gates was restless. The Gothic commander was Alaric, a Roman general and barbarian chieftain. Leading an army that was short of food and potentially mutinous, sacking Rome was his only way forward. The old heart of Rome's empire fell to a conqueror's sword for the first time in eight hundred years. For three days, Alaric's Goths sacked the eternal city. In the words of a contemporary, the mother of the world had been murdered. Alaric's story is the culmination of a long historical journey by which the Goths came to be a part of the Roman world. Whether as friends or foes of the Roman empire, the Goths and their history are entwined with the larger history of Rome in the third and fourth centuries. Rome's Gothic Wars explains how the Goths came into existence on the margins of the Roman world, how different Gothic groups dealt with the enormous power of Rome just beyond their lands, and how, in two traumatic years, thousands of Goths entered the imperial provinces and destroyed the army that was sent to suppress them, leaving the emperor of the eternal city dead on the field of battle. Unlike other histories of the barbarians, Rome's Gothic Wars shows exactly how and why modern historians understand the Goths the way they do - and why our understanding is so controversial. Michael Kulikowski is associate professor of history at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. A recipient of the Solmsen Fellowship at the Institute for Research in the Humanities at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, he is the author of Late Roman Spain and Its Cities, which was awarded an Honorable Mention in Classics and Archaeology from the Association of American University Presses. His scholarly articles have appeared in Early Medieval Europe, Britannia, Phoenix, and Byzantium, and he has appeared on the History Channel's Barbarians series.

The Ruin of the Roman Empire / James J. O'Donnell.  New York : Ecco, c2008.  436pp.  Main Library DG311 .O49 2008 : The Roman empire was not invaded by barbarians in the fifth century, says classical historian O'Donnell. Rather, these tribes—Visigoths, Vandals and others—were refugees who crossed into the empire in search of a place to settle. These migrants were turned into enemies by Rome. O'Donnell (Augustine), provost of Georgetown, supports this controversial thesis by drawing on primary sources to analyze the geopolitical errors that led to Rome's fall. Emperor Theodoric, he says, had preserved social order and prosperity among the various peoples of the vast empire. But seven years later, Justinian squandered that good order. He failed to make peace with Persia in the east by not emphasizing a common interest of trade; he failed to establish good relations with the kings of the western Mediterranean and to develop his own homeland, the Balkans; finally, by banning certain Christian sects, he alienated some border regions and sowed the seeds of rebellion. These failures not only divided the empire, they made it vulnerable to attack from peoples that had once been friends. O'Donnell's richly layered book provides significant glimpses into the many factors that leveled a mighty empire.

Note : Always check status to see if book is checked out.  If status say "in process", ask for it at the Circulation Desk.

New Books, S-T

Saints and church spaces in the late antique Mediterranean : architecture, cult, and community / Ann Marie Yasin.  Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge Univ Press 2009.  338pp.  Fine Arts Library Art Collection (4 West) NA4817 .Y37 2009 : This book explores the intersection between two key developments of the fourth through seventh centuries CE: the construction of monumental churches and the veneration of saints. While Christian sacred topography is usually interpreted in narrowly religious terms as points of contact with holy places and people, this book considers church buildings as spatial environments in which a range of social 'work' happened. It draws on approaches developed in the fields of anthropology, ritual studies, and social geography to examine, for example, how church buildings facilitated commemoration of the community's dead, establishment of a shared historical past, and communication with the divine. Surveying evidence for the introduction of saints into liturgical performance and the architectural and decorative programs of churches, this analysis explains how saints helped to bolster the boundaries of church space, reinforce local social and religious hierarchies, and negotiate the community's place within larger regional and cosmic networks.

The Satires of Horace / translated by A M. Juster ; introduction by Susanna Braund.  Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2008.  147pp.  Main Library PA6396.S3 J87 2008 : The Roman philosopher and dramatic critic Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65-3 B.C.), known in English as Horace, was also the most famous lyric poet of his age. Writing in the troubled decade ending with the establishment of Augustus's regime, his Satires provide trenchant social commentary on men's perennial enslavement to money, power, fame, and sex.  An acquired taste.  Excerpt : "Tell me, Maecenas, why no one's content with either what they've done or fate has sent, yet they applaud men taking other trails."

Scipio Africanus : Rome's Greatest General / Richard A. Gabriel.  Washington, D.C. : Potomac Books, c2008.  303pp.  Main Library DG248.S3 G33 2008 :  The world often misunderstands its greatest men while neglecting others entirely. Scipio Africanus, surely the greatest general that Rome produced, suffered both these fates. Today scholars celebrate the importance of Hannibal, even though Scipio defeated the legendary general in the Second Punic War and was the central military figure of his time. In this scholarly and heretofore unmatched military biography of the distinguished Roman soldier, Richard A. Gabriel establishes Scipio’s rightful place in military history as the greater of the two generals.,,,Before Scipio, few Romans would have dreamed of empire, and Scipio himself would have regarded such an ambition as a danger to his beloved republic. And yet, paradoxically, Scipio’s victories in Spain and Africa enabled Rome to consolidate its hold over Italy and become the dominant power in the western Mediterranean, virtually ensuring a later confrontation with the Greco-Macedonian kingdoms to the east as well as the empire’s expansion into North Africa and the Levant. The Roman imperium was being born, and it was Scipio who had sired it.....Gabriel draws upon ancient texts, including those from Livy, Polybius, Diodorus, Silius Italicus, and others, as primary sources and examines all additional material available to the modern scholar in French, German, English, and Italian. His book offers a complete bibliography of all extant sources regarding Scipio’s life. The result is a rich, detailed, and contextual treatment of the life and career of Scipio Africanus, one of Rome’s greatest generals, if not the greatest of them all.

The Scroll and the Marble : Studies in Reading and Reception in Hellenistic Poetry / Peter Bing. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2009. 304pp. Main Library PA3081 .B56 2009 : While people of previous ages relied on public performance as their chief means of experiencing poetry, the Hellenistic age developed what one may term a culture of reading. This was the first era in which poets consciously shaped their works with an eye toward publication and reception not just on the civic stage but in several media---in performance, on inscribed monuments, in scrolls. The essays in Peter Bing's collection explore how poetry accommodated various audiences and how these audiences in turn experienced the text in diverse ways. Over the years, Bing's essays have focused on certain Hellenistic authors and genres---particularly on Callimachus and Posidippus and on epigram. His themes, too, have been broadly consistent. Thus, although the essays in The Scroll and the Marble span some twenty years, they offer a coherent vision of Hellenistic poetics as a whole.

Secrets of Pompeii : Everyday Life in Ancient Rome / Emidio de Albentiis ; photography by Alfredo and Pio Foglia ; [edited by Luisa Chiap]. Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, c2009. 196pp. Main Library DG70.P7 D3718 2009 : The remains of the ancient city of Pompeii, frozen in time following the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in A.D. 79, have provided invaluable evidence of daily life, not only in Rome's provinces, but in its larger urban centers as well.....This book provides a fascinating look at how ancient Romans interacted in their public squares and marketplaces, how they worshipped, decorated their homes, and spent their leisure time--at the theater, in the gymnasium, and in the baths and brothels. Illustrated with photographs of architectural remains and exquisite details from a range of ancient artworks, including wall paintings, sculptures, mosaics, and carved reliefs, the book offers a glimpse into a lost world.

The Seer in Ancient Greece  / Michael Attyah Flower.  Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008.  305pp.  Main Library BF1765 .F56 2008 : The seer (mantis), an expert in the art of divination, operated in ancient Greek society through a combination of charismatic inspiration and diverse skills ranging from examining the livers of sacrificed animals to spirit possession. Unlike the palm readers and mediums who exist on the fringe of modern society, many seers were highly paid, well respected, educated members of the elite who played an essential role in the conduct of daily life, political decisions, and military campaigns. Armies, for example, never went anywhere without one. This engaging book, the only comprehensive study of this fascinating figure, enters into the socioreligious world of ancient Greece to explore what seers did, why they were so widely employed, and how their craft served as a viable and useful social practice.

Seneca and The Idea of Tragedy / Gregory A. Staley. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2009. 185pp. Main Library PA6685 .S73 2009 : As both a literary genre and a view of life, tragedy has from the very beginning spurred a dialogue between poetry and philosophy. Plato famously banned tragedians from his ideal community because he believed that their representations of vicious behavior could deform minds. Aristotle set out to answer Plato's objections, arguing that fiction offers a faithful image of the truth and that it promotes emotional health through the mechanism of catharsis. Aristotle's definition of tragedy actually had its greatest impact not on Greek tragedy itself but on later Latin literature, beginning with the tragedies of the Roman poet and Stoic philosopher Seneca (4 BC - AD 65). Scholarship over the last fifty years, however, has increasingly sought to identify in Seneca's prose writings a Platonic poetics which is antagonistic toward tragedy and which might therefore explain why Seneca's plays seem so often to present the failure of Stoicism. As Gregory Staley argues in this book, when Senecan tragedy fails to stage virtue we should see in this not the failure of Stoicism but a Stoic conception of tragedy as the right vehicle for imaging Seneca's familiar world of madmen and fools. Senecan tragedy enacts Aristotle's conception of the genre as a vivid image of the truth and treats tragedy as a natural venue in which to explore the human soul. Staley's reading of Seneca's plays draws on current scholarship about Stoicism as well as on the writings of Renaissance authors like Sir Philip Sidney, who borrowed from Seneca the word "idea" to designate what we would now label as a "theory" of tragedy. Seneca and the Idea of Tragedy will appeal broadly to students and scholars of classics, ancient philosophy, and English literature.

Sex and Sensuality in the Ancient World / Giulia Sissa ; translated by George Staunton.  New Haven [Conn.] ; London : Yale University Press, c2008.  224pp.  Main Library HQ13 .S5213 2008  : In this fascinating book Giulia Sissa looks at sensuality and sexual desire in the Greek, Roman, and early Christian worlds, demonstrating how modern concepts of sexuality have emerged from the practices and theories of ancient times. Countering the assumptions of many other scholars, Sissa emphasizes the centrality of heterosexual desire and passion in the classical period, arguing that the importance of homosexuality has been overemphasized....Drawing widely on contemporary literature and philosophy, Sissa examines each culture in turn, arriving at a variety of fresh insights. She draws a distinction between pleasure and desire in the ancient world, for example, and she analyes the different ways in which men and women were seen to experience erotic feeling, looking closely at portrayals of such transgressive women as Medea, Clytemnestra, and Jocasta. Incisive and often provocative, this is a striking new analysis of sexual attitudes in the classical and post-classical world.

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome / Rebecca Langlands.  Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2006.  399pp.  Main Library HQ13 .L36 2006 : Traditionally, scholars have approached Roman sexuality using categories of sexual ethics drawn from contemporary, Western society. In this book Dr Langlands seeks to move away from these towards a deeper understanding of the issues that mattered to the Romans themselves, and the ways in which they negotiated them, by focusing on the untranslatable concept of pudicitia (broadly meaning 'sexual virtue'). She offers a series of nuanced close readings of texts from a wide spectrum of Latin literature, including history, oratory, love poetry and Valerius Maximus' work Memorable Deeds and Sayings. Pudicitia emerges as a controversial and unsettled topic, at the heart of Roman debates about the difference between men and women, the relation between mind and body, and the ethics of power and status differentiation within Roman culture. The book develops strategies for approaching the study of an ancient culture through sensitive critical readings of its literary productions.

Slavery in the Roman World / Sandra R. Joshel.  Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.  236pp.  Main Library HT863 .J67 2010 : "Rome was a slave society. Beyond the thousands of slaves who worked and lived in the heartland of the Roman Empire, slavery fundamentally shaped Roman society and culture. In this book, Sandra Joshel offers a comprehensive overview of Roman slavery. Using a variety of sources, including literature, law, and material culture, she examines the legal condition of Roman slaves, traces the stages of the sale of slaves, analyzes the relations between slaves and slaveholders, and details the social and family lives of slaves. Richly illustrated with images of slaves, captives, and the material conditions of slaves, this book also considers food, clothing, and housing of slaves, thereby locating slaves in their physical surroundings ,Äì the cook in the kitchen,the maid in her owner,Äôs bedroom, the smith in a workshop, and the farm laborer in a vineyard. Based on rigorous scholarship, Slavery in Roman Society serves as a lively, accessible account to introductory-level students of the ancient Mediterranean world. 

Song of Wrath : the Peloponnesian War Begins / J. E. Lendon.  New York : Basic Books, c2010. 576pp.  Main Library DF229 .L46 2010  : For ten years in the late fifth century BC. the dueling city-states of Athens and Sparta fought the first bloody chapter of the Peloponnesian War, the conflict that turned the Golden Age of Greece to iron....Somber, authoritarian Sparta, with its mighty infantry, was the elderly, respected master of Greece. Democratic Athens---cheerful, mercantile, and arrogant---had acquired strength both new and naval. When Athens achieved great power, and sought to have its great-power status acknowledged, the newcomer's challenge to Sparta's primacy sparked off the Ten Years' War (431-421 BC). a fight for national honor carried out by acts of callous vengeance and surprising grace, by guile and mercy, by invasions. sea-battles, sieges, raids, and, finally, by tremendous and climatic battles on land....A gripping account of the epic clash of Athens and Sparta. Song of Wrath charts the military and diplomatic history of ancient Greece from 479 BC. when the allied Greeks threw back the Persian host of Xerxes, to 421 BC. when the Peace of Nicias brought an end to the first ten-year season of the Peloponnesian War, In vigorous prose and vivid detail. J. E. Lendon has given us a terrifically readable account of the angry origins and furious escalation of the Peloponnesian War....Song of Wrath offers a muscular new way of understanding national strategy and foreign relations. one that is just as powerful when applied to today's world as when it is applied to the ancient. A story of new pride challenging old. Song of Wrath is the first work of Ancient Greek history for the post-cold-war generation.

Sophocles : Oedipus Tyrannus / Fiona Macintosh. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009. 203pp. Main Library PA4413.O7 M23 2009 : Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannus (or Oedipus Rex) has exerted more influence than any other drama, ancient or modern, on the history of theatre, and this influence has extended far beyond the boundaries of the western theatrical tradition to include African and Oriental theatre histories as well. This volume traces Sophocles' paradigmatic ancient tragedy from its first appearance on the stage in the fifth century BC to present day productions. The afterlife of Oedipus has played a key role in the history of ideas, and this volume examines its centrality to the history of stage censorship and political and cultural upheaval across the centuries. More recently, the protagonist has come under close scrutiny in his association with the Oedipus of psychoanalytical theory. Macintosh demonstrates how, by following the fortunes of Sophocles' Oedipus on the world stage, one witnesses its intersection with and impact upon the history of theatre and the history of ideas.

The Spartacus War / Barry Strauss.  New York : Simon & Schuster, 2009.  264pp.  Main Library DG258.5 .S83 2009  : The Spartacus War is the extraordinary story of the most famous slave rebellion in the ancient world, the fascinating true story behind a legend that has been the inspiration for novelists, filmmakers, and revolutionaries for 2,000 years. Starting with only seventy-four men, a gladiator named Spartacus incited a rebellion that threatened Rome itself. With his fellow gladiators, Spartacus built an army of 60,000 soldiers and controlled the southern Italian countryside. A charismatic leader, he used religion to win support. An ex-soldier in the Roman army, Spartacus excelled in combat. He defeated nine Roman armies and kept Rome at bay for two years before he was defeated. After his final battle, 6,000 of his followers were captured and crucified along Rome's main southern highway....The Spartacus War is the dramatic and factual account of one of history's great rebellions. Spartacus was beaten by a Roman general, Crassus, who had learned how to defeat an insurgency. But the rebels were partly to blame for their failure. Their army was large and often undisciplined; the many ethnic groups within it frequently quarreled over leadership. No single leader, not even Spartacus, could keep them all in line. And when faced with a choice between escaping to freedom and looting, the rebels chose wealth over liberty, risking an eventual confrontation with Rome's most powerful forces....The result of years of research, The Spartacus War is based not only on written documents but also on archaeological evidence, historical reconstruction, and the author's extensive travels in the Italian countryside that Spartacus once conquered.

Spartans : A New History / Nigel M. Kennell. Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. 218pp. Main Library DF261.S8 K45 2010 : Spartans: A New History chronicles the rise and fall of ancient Sparta, from its Bronze Age origins to the powerful Greek city-state's demise in Late Antiquity. Incorporating the latest archaeological evidence and scholarly research, Kennell's comprehensive historical account includes discussions of the Dorian invasion and Greek legend of the Return of the Heraclidae, the Spartan conquest of Messenia, and the origins of helot slavery. Also covered is Sparta's development as the foremost military power in Greece and its role in the Persian and Peloponnesian wars. Kennell punctuates the narrative with biographical sketches of important figures in Spartan history. Primarily focused on the Archaic and Classical periods, the book also surveys Spartan history during the Hellenistic and Roman ages, when Spartans crafted an image of their city as an unaltered relic from its earlier glory days....Spartans: A New History challenges preconceptions about Spartan history and represents an important source on the most significant issues in Sparta scholarship today.

The Splendor of Roman Wall Painting / Umberto Pappalardo ; photographs by Luciano Romano.  Los Angeles : J. Paul Getty Museum, 2009.  240pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection ND2575 .P28 2009 : Visitors to the former residences of wealthy ancient Romans cannot help but be astonished by their grand architecture and enchanting wall paintings, still vibrant with cinnabar reds, golden yellows, and deep greens. The beauty and intricacy of these ancient frescoes are showcased in the sumptuous volume Domus: Wall Painting in the Roman House, published by the J. Paul Getty Museum in 2004 and now available in this abridged and affordable edition....Following an introduction to the Roman domestic ideal that inspired these wall decorations and a discussion of the evolution in painting styles, the author conducts a tour of twenty-eight houses in Pompeii, Herculaneum, Oplontis, and the city of Rome. Here are painted scenes--rich with fabulous details of illusionistic architecture, lush gardens, exotic animals, and erotic adventures--impressive in their display of technical mastery and enduring in their visual impact.

The Storm Before the Storm : The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic / Michael Duncan.  New York : Public Affairs, 2017.    The creator of the award-winning podcast series The History of Rome and Revolutions brings to life the bloody battles, political machinations, and human drama that set the stage for the fall of the Roman Republic. The Roman Republic was one of the most remarkable achievements in the history of civilization. Beginning as a small city-state in central Italy, Rome gradually expanded into a wider world filled with petty tyrants, barbarian chieftains, and despotic kings. Through the centuries, Rome's model of cooperative and participatory government remained remarkably durable and unmatched in the history of the ancient world. In 146 BC, Rome finally emerged as the strongest power in the Mediterranean. But the very success of the Republic proved to be its undoing. The republican system was unable to cope with the vast empire Rome now ruled: rising economic inequality disrupted traditional ways of life, endemic social and ethnic prejudice led to clashes over citizenship and voting rights, and rampant corruption and ruthless ambition sparked violent political clashes that cracked the once indestructible foundations of the Republic. Chronicling the years 146-78 BC, The Storm Before the Storm dives headlong into the first generation to face this treacherous new political environment. Abandoning the ancient principles of their forbearers, men like Marius, Sulla, and the Gracchi brothers set dangerous new precedents that would start the Republic on the road to destruction and provide a stark warning about what can happen to a civilization that has lost its way.

Style and Function in Roman Decoration : Living With Objects and Interiors / Ellen Swift.  Burlington, VT : Ashgate, 2009.  231pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection NK680 .S95 2009 : This important book puts forward a new interpretation of Roman decorative art, focusing on the function of decoration in the social context. It examines the three principal areas of social display and conspicuous consumption in the Roman world: social space, entertainment, and dress, and discusses the significance of the decoration of objects and interiors within these contexts, drawing examples from both Rome and its environs, and the Western provinces, from the early Imperial period to Late Antiquity....Focusing on specific examples, including mosaics and other interior décor, silver plate, glass and pottery vessels, and jewellery and other dress accessories, Swift demonstrates the importance of decoration in creating and maintaining social networks and identities and fostering appropriate social behaviour, and its role in perpetuating social convention and social norms. It is argued that our understanding of stylistic change and the relationship between this and the wider social context in the art of the Roman period is greatly enhanced by an initial focus on the particular social relationships fostered by decorated objects and spaces.

Ten Speeches / Marcus Tullius Cicero ; translated, with notes and introduction, by James E.G. Zetzel. Indianapolis : Hackett Pub. Co., c2009. 332pp. Main Library PA6307.A4 Z48 2009 : Contents - Against Verres : on the theft of works of art -- In support of Manilius' law -- Second speech against Catiline -- In defense of Lucius Murena -- In defense of the poet Archias -- In defense of Marcus Caelius -- Against Lucius Calpurnius Piso -- On behalf of Marcus Marcellus -- Fourth Philippic oration against Antony -- Ninth Philippic oration against Antony.

The Theban plays : Oedipus the king, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone / Sophocles ; translated, with notes and an introduction by Ruth Fainlight and Robert J. Littman.  Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.  219pp. Main Library PA4414.A2 F33 2009 : Sophocles' Theban Plays -- Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone -- lie at the core of the Western literary canon. They are extensively translated, universally taught, and frequently performed. Chronicling the downfall of Oedipus, the legendary king of Thebes, and his descendants, the Theban Plays are as relevant to present-day thought about love, duty, patriotism, family, and war as when they were written 2,500 years ago....Recent translations of the plays, while linguistically correct, often fail to capture the beauty of Sophocles' original words. In combining the skills of a distinguished poet, Ruth Fainlight, and an eminent classical scholar, Robert J. Littman, this new edition of the Theban Plays is both a major work of poetry and a faithful translation of the original works....Thoughtful introductions, extensive notes, and glossaries frame each of the plays within their historical contexts and illuminate important themes, mythological roots, and previous interpretations....This elegant and uncommonly readable translation will make these seminal Greek tragedies accessible to a new generation of readers.

The Theme of Returning Home in Ancient Greek Literature : the Nostos of the Epic Heroes / Marigo Alexopoulou ; with a foreword by Vayos Liapis. Lewiston, N.Y. : Edwin Mellen Press, c2009. 150pp.  Main Library PA3015.H56 A44 2009 : This book is about nostos, the return home of a hero. Although the importance of this topic has long been recognized by scholars, this is the first full length book on nostos both across a range of tragedies and in the light of the diverse cultural background of the motif. It shows how the elements of Homer's narrative were to be developed by later Greek poets, and particularly the fifth-century tragedians and the Hellenistic poets....A central, and fascinating, theme of [this] work is that the return home is never a return to the same world as that from which the hero departed. Dr. Alexopoulou has the great advantage of being qualified to write about modern, as well as classical, Greek poetry... she traces the tradition established by Homer right down to the poetry of Seferis and other twentieth-century Greek poets.

Thermopylae : the Battle That Changed the World / Paul Cartledge. Woodstock : Overlook Press, 2006. 313pp. Main Library DF225.5 .C37 2006 : An account of the 480 B.C. battle between the Persian forces of King Xerxes and the Spartans under King Leonidas links the battle's events and outcome to today's world, explaining how the invasion of Europe redefined international culture and class organization.

Thucydides / edited by Jeffrey S. Rusten. Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2009. 519pp. Main Library DF229.T6 T52 2009 : Thucydides' account of the war between Athens and Sparta is the first great work of political history and still a fundamental text for political science and international relations today; it is also a compelling story, full of vivid characters and tragic miscalculations. This collection of essays is designed to accompany, instruct, and stimulate readers of Thucydides by making accessible some classic and influential studies that are frequently cited but not always easy to access. (One-third of the essays appear here in English for the first time.) All Greek is translated, and an introductory chapter surveys the chronology and thematic controversies among Thucydides' readings from antiquity to the present.

Thucydides, Pericles, and the Idea of Athens in the Peloponnesian War / Martha C. Taylor. Cambridge, England ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2009 [c.2010]. 311pp. Main Library DF229.T6 T39 2009 : Thucydides, Pericles, and the Idea of Athens in the Peloponnesian War is the first comprehensive study of Thucydides' presentation of Pericles' radical redefinition of the city of Athens during the Peloponnesian War. Martha Taylor argues that Thucydides subtly critiques Pericles' vision of Athens as a city divorced from the territory of Attica and focused, instead, on the sea and the empire. Thucydides shows that Pericles' reconceputalization of the city led the Athenians both to Melos and to Sicily. Toward the end of his work, Thucydides demonstrates that flexible thinking about the city exacerbated the Athenians' civil war. Providing a thorough critique and analysis of Thucydides' neglected book 8, Taylor shows that Thucydides praises political compromise centered around the traditional city in Attica. In doing so, he implicitly censures both Pericles and the Athenian imperial project itself.

Thucydides : the Reinvention of History / Donald Kagan. New York : Viking, 2009. 257pp. Main Library DF229.T6 K28 2009 : A reconsideration of the first modern historian and his methods from a renowned scholar. The grandeur and power of Thucydides' The Peloponnesian War have enthralled readers, historians, and statesmen alike for two and a half millennia, and the work and its author have had an enduring influence on those who think about international relations and war, especially in our own time. In Thucydides, Donald Kagan, one of our foremost classics scholars, illuminates the great historian and his work both by examining him in the context of his time and by considering him as a revisionist historian. Thucydides took a spectacular leap into modernity by refusing to seek explanations for human behavior in the will of the gods, or even in the will of individuals, looking instead at the behavior of men in society. In this context, Kagan explains how The Peloponnesian War differs significantly from other accounts offered by Thucydides' contemporaries and stands as the first modern work of political history, dramatically influencing the manner in which history has been conceptualized ever since.

Translating Rome / edited by Robert Cummings ; [translated by] Robert Grave. Manchester : Carcanet, 2010. 639pp. Main Library PA6163 .T736 2010 : In his translations of three major works from the Roman world, collected in a single volume for the first time, Robert Graves brings the classical world to life. As Robert Cummings demonstrates in his introduction, Graves sometimes overrides the demands of accuracy; his interpretations of and responses to his material are at times idiosyncratic but, 'Whatever complaints are lodged against Graves's translations, he remains, after fifty years, eminently readable.' It is the novelist's narrative virtuosity, his flair for catching a character's individual voice, and above all his endless curiosity about the world, that make these translations so compelling; they also mirror Graves's interest in myth in The White Goddess and his imaginative recreations of the classical world in I, Claudius and Claudius the God....The Golden Ass is an essential work in European literature, a magical, sometimes bawdy adventure, to which Graves responds with exuberant delight. In contrast, Lucan's Pharsalia, an account of the civil war between Julius Casear and Pompey, raises for Graves issues of the writer's moral responsibility, the rejection of rhetoric, that in his own time, he writes, had sent poets 'marching through the Waste Land' after the Great War. The Twelve Caesars exemplifies the writer's responsibility to the truthful record in its vivid accounts of the corruptions of arbitrary power.

Travelling Heroes : in the Epic Age of Homer / Robin Lane Fox. New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 2009. 465pp. Main Library PA4037 .L328 2009 : The eighth century B.C. was the formative age of the great epics of Homer, a remote and, in some ways, mysterious era. In this groundbreaking book, Robin Lane Fox takes us into that time before history to explore questions ranging from the origins of the Greek gods to the spread of classical culture in the Mediterranean world. It is a remarkable tour de force of scholarship and creative reasoning, written with flair and the authority gained from a lifetime of study and personal experience of key sites....Presented as a kind of historical detective story, Travelling Heroes draws upon archaeology, ancient texts, and new discoveries to develop a fresh and provocative thesis: that migrants from in the Greek island of Euboea settled in specific places both in the Near East and in Italy and that what they found there helped shape their most distinctive myths. In fascinating detail, Lane Fox describes the journeys of the travellers and the contacts they made with Phoenicians, Assyrians, and the people of north Cyprus and Syria, and he shows the way they drew themes—and even references to particular topographic features—into what would become the classic stories of gods and legend. He also offers new insights into Homer himself....Robin Lane Fox is probably the most widely read historian of the ancient Greek world, and Travelling Heroes displays the same lively originality that marked his writing about the Bible in The Unauthorized Version and about the triumph of Christianity in Pagans and Christians. Learned but never dry, controversial but soundly based, it brings a distant and nearly forgotten time brilliantly to life again.

Two Romes : Rome and Constantinople in late antiquity / edited by Lucy Grig and Gavin Kelly.  New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.  465pp.  Main Library DG63 .T86 2012 : The city of Constantinople was named New Rome or Second Rome very soon after its foundation in AD 324; over the next two hundred years it replaced the original Rome as the greatest city of the Mediterranean. In this unified essay collection, prominent international scholars examine the changing roles and perceptions of Rome and Constantinople in Late Antiquity from a range of different disciplines and scholarly perspectives. The seventeen chapters cover both the comparative development and the shifting status of the two cities. Developments in politics and urbanism are considered, along with the cities' changing relationships with imperial power, the church, and each other, and their evolving representations in both texts and images. These studies present important revisionist arguments and new interpretations of significant texts and events. This comparative perspective allows the neglected subject of the relationship between the two Romes to come into focus while avoiding the teleological distortions common in much past scholarship. ...An introductory section sets the cities, and their comparative development, in context. Part Two looks at topography, and includes the first English translation of the Notitia of Constantinople. The following section deals with politics proper, considering the role of emperors in the two Romes and how rulers interacted with their cities. Part Four then considers the cities through the prism of literature, in particular through the distinctively late antique genre of panegyric. The fifth group of essays considers a crucial aspect shared by the two cities: their role as Christian capitals. Lastly, a provocative epilogue looks at the enduring Roman identity of the post-Heraclian Byzantine state. Thus, Two Romes not only illuminates the study of both cities but also enriches our understanding of the late Roman world in its entirety.

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New Books, U-T

The Unknown Odysseus : Alternate Worlds in Homer's Odyssey / Thomas Van Nortwick. Ann Arbor : University of Michigan Press, c2009. 144pp. Main Library PA4167 .V36 2009 : The Unknown Odysseus is a study of how Homer creates two versions of his hero, one who is the triumphant protagonist of the revenge plot and another, more subversive, anonymous figure whose various personae exemplify an entirely different set of assumptions about the world through which each hero moves and about the shape and meaning of human life. Separating the two perspectives allows us to see more clearly how the poem's dual focus can begin to explain some of the notorious difficulties readers have encountered in thinking about the Odyssey. In The Unknown Odysseus, Thomas Van Nortwick offers the most complete exploration to date of the implications of Odysseus' divided nature, showing how it allows Homer to explore the riddles of human identity in a profound way that is not usually recognized by studies focusing on only one "real" hero in the narrative. This new perspective on the epic enriches the world of the poem in a way that will interest both general readers and classical scholars.

The Vandals  / Andy Merrills and Richard Miles.  Chichester, U.K. ; Malden, MA : Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.  351pp.  D139 .M47 2010  Online : The Vandals is the first book available in the English Language dedicated to exploring the sudden rise and dramatic fall of this complex North African Kingdom. This complete history provides a full account of the Vandals and re-evaluates key aspects of the society including:

  • Political and economic structures  such as the complex foreign policy which combined diplomatic alliances and marriages with brutal raiding
  • The extraordinary cultural development of secular learning, and the religious struggles that threatened to tear the state apart
  • The nature of Vandal identity from a social and gender perspective

Villa of the Birds : the Excavation and Preservation of the Kom al-Dikka Mosaics / Wojciech Kołątaj, Grzegorz Majcherek, and Ewa Parandowska.  Cairo ; New York : American University in Cairo Press, 2007.  126pp.  Fine Arts Library, Art Collection DT73.A4 K64 2007 : This fascinating book describes the excavation and preservation of three early Roman villas in Egypt's ancient port city of Alexandria. Chronicling the work of the Polish Archaeological Mission in Alexandria, Villa of the Birds is an engaging and informative account of how these ancient dwellings were unearthed, and how the famous mosaic floors were brought to light two thousand years after they were laid....Villa of the Birds reconstructs not only the villas themselves, with their magnificent mosaics, but also the history of how they were built and used, and ultimately how they were destroyed by fire. The book is richly illustrated with detailed floor plans as well as spectacular color photographs of the mosaics themselves.

Voices of Ancient Greece and Rome : contemporary accounts of daily life / David Matz, editor.  Santa Barbara, Calif. : Greenwood, [2012]  268pp.  DE59 .V64 2012 : Collecting documents culled from the writings of ancient Greek and Roman authors, this book provides a glimpse of what life was like in ancient times and illustrates the relevance of these long-ago civilizations to modern life. * Over 40 documents, excerpted from the writings of ancient Greek and Roman authors, such as Plutarch's description of the banishment from Athens of a just man * A timeline of the ancient Greco-Roman world provides a chronology of important events * A glossary containing descriptions/definitions of many Greek and Roman words and terms, such as "strategos"

The War That Killed Achilles : the True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War / Caroline Alexander. New York, NY : Viking, 2009. 296pp. Main Library PA4037 .A5955 2009 : A groundbreaking reading of the Iliad that restores Homer's vision of the tragedy of war, by the bestselling author of The Bounty. Few warriors, in life or literature, have challenged their commanding officer and the rationale of the war they fought as fiercely as did Homer's hero Achilles. Today, the Iliad is celebrated as one of the greatest works in literature, the epic of all epics; many have forgotten that the subject of this ancient poem was war-not merely the poetical romance of the war at Troy, but war, in all its enduring devastation. Using the legend of the Trojan war, the Iliad addresses the central questions defining the war experience of every age: Is a warrior ever justified in standing up against his commander? Must he sacrifice his life for someone else's cause? Giving his life for his country, does a man betray his family? How is a catastrophic war ever allowed to start-and why, if all parties wish it over, can it not be ended? As she did with The Endurance and The Bounty, Caroline Alexander lets us see why a familiar story has had such an impact on us for centuries, revealing what Homer really meant. Written with the authority of a scholar and the vigor of a bestselling narrative historian, The War That Killed Achilles is a superb and utterly timely presentation of one of the timeless stories of our civilization.

Warfare in the Ancient World : From the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome / Stefan G. Chrissanthos. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2008. 214pp. Main Library U29 .C48 2008 : From the clash of bronze weapons on bronze armor to the fall of Rome, war often decided the course of ancient history. This volume is a practical introduction to the study of warfare in the ancient world, beginning with Egypt and Mesopotamia, and tracing the advances made in battle tactics, technology, and government over hundreds of years, culminating with developments in Greece and the Roman Empire. The chronological structure allows the reader to trace certain general themes down through the centuries: how various civilizations waged war; who served in the various armies and why; who the generals and officers were who made the decisions in the field; what type of government controlled these armies; and from what type of society they sprang. Major events and important individuals are discussed in their historical contexts, providing a complete understanding of underlying causes, and enabling readers to follow the evolution of ancient warfare as armies and empires became steadily larger and more sophisticated. Yet as Chrissanthos makes clear, history comes full circle during this period. Rome's collapse in 476 C.E. inaugurated an unforeseen dark age in which great armies were left decimated despite advanced technology that, while proving decisive in the outcome of many critical battles and stand-offs, had vanished amidst the Empire's crumbling walls.

Water for the City, Fountains for the People : Monumental Fountains in the Roman Eas. an archaeological study of water management / Julian Richard.  Turnhout : Brepols, 2012  307pp.  Main Library DS56 .R544 2012 : Monumental fountains were essential utilitarian and aesthetic components of any well-to-do Roman urban center. Besides their functional role of providing water, they were also designed to express the social, political and religious universe of Roman cities. Prominently located in public spaces, they were active bearers of collective and individual identities. This study examines the function and the symbolic meaning of monumental fountains within the complex framework of urban life in the Eastern provinces of the Roman Empire. Different aspects of monumental fountains -architecture, hydro-technical apparatus, sculpture assemblages, epigraphy,..- were studied from an integrated perspective in order to draw an exhaustive picture of these ubiquitous symbols of opulence and self-representation.

The Way of Herodotus : Travels With the Man Who Invented History / Justin Marozzi.  [Cambridge, MA] : Da Capo Press, 2008.  348pp.  Main Library D56.52.H45 M37 2008 : An intriguing travel history exploring and evoking the world of Herodotus, with abundant commentary on the legacy and spirit of the “father of history” and the literary art he created.

Why We're All Romans : the Roman Contribution to the Western World / Carl J. Richard.  Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield : Distributed by National Book Network, c2010.  301pp. Main Library DG77 .R53 2010 : America's premier intellectual historian surveys the culture of the ancient Mediterranean with scholarly acumen and humane wit. Whether discussing Roman law, architecture, history or "the Romanization of Christianity,' Carl Richard's well-written and informed account is an excellent introduction to the ancient culture that shaped the United States and is still important for American freedom and creativity.

A World History of Ancient Political Thought / Antony Black.  Oxford : Oxford University Press, c2009.  260pp.  Main Library JC51 .B65 2009 : This book examines the political thought of China, Greece, Israel, Rome, India, Iran, Egypt, Mesopotamia, and also early Christianity, from prehistory to c. 200 CE. Each of these had its own priorities, based on a religious and philosophical perspective. This led to different ideas about who should govern, how to govern, and what government was for....In most cultures, sacred monarchy was the norm, but this ranged from absolute to conditional authority. 'The people' were recipients of royal (and divine) beneficence. Justice, the rule of law and meritocracy were generally regarded as fundamental. In Greece and Rome, democracy and liberty were born, while in Israel the polity was based on covenant and the law. Confucius taught humaneness, Mozi and Christianity taught universal love; Kautilya and the Chinese 'Legalists' believed in realpolitik and an authoritarian state. The conflict between might and right was resolved in many different ways....Chinese, Greek and Indian thinkers reflected on the origin and purposes of the state. Status and class were embedded in Indian and Chinese thought, the nation in Israelite thought. The Stoics and Cicero, on the other hand, saw humanity as a single unit. Political philosophy, using logic, evidence and dialectic, was invented in China and Greece, statecraft in China and India, political science in Greece. Plato and Aristotle, followed by Polybius and Cicero, started 'western' political philosophy....This book covers political philosophy, religious ideology, constitutional theory, social ethics, official and popular political culture.

The World of Ancient Rome : a daily life encyclopedia / James W. Ermatinger.  Santa Barbara, California : Greenwood, [2015]  2 volumes (xxx, 813 pages)  Main Library DG77 .E77 2015 : This study of Ancient Rome offers a fascinating glimpse of what Roman society was like  --  from fashion, to food, to politics and recreation -- gathered from literary works, art, and archaeological remains. * Focuses on daily life rather than dates and wars, making for engaging content for all readers * Offers a bibliography of important works as well as online and print resources for further reading * Includes coverage of a breadth of topics ranging from performing arts to town planning and military uniforms to banquets * Features approximately 250 entries with topics arranged alphabetically

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Subject Guide

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Sappho Reading to Her Companions, Attic Vase, c. 435 B.C.

Sappho Reading to Her Companions

Red-figure vase by the Group of Polygnotos, ca. 440–430 BC. Seated, Sappho is reading one of her poems to a group of three student-friends. National Archaeological Museum in Athens, 1260.

Muse Reading a Scroll. Louvre Museum

Muse Reading A Scroll

Book Covers, L-N

Book Covers, O-R


Odes for victorious athletes

Odes for victorious athletes


The Origins of Theater in Ancient Greece and Beyond : From Ritual to Drama

The Origins of Theater in Ancient Greece and Beyond : Rrom Ritual to Drama


Out of Athens : the New Ancient Greeks

Out of Athens : the New Ancient Greeks


The Oxford handbook of social relations in the Roman world

The Oxford handbook of social relations in the Roman world


The Peloponnesian War

The Peloponnesian War


The Peloponnesian War : Athens, Sparta, and the Struggle for Greece

The Peloponnesian War : Athens, Sparta, and the Struggle for Greece


Persius and Juvenal

Perseus and Juvenal


Philip II of Macedonia

Philip II of Macedonia


The Poison King : the Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy

The Poison King : the Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy


Politeness and Politics in Cicero's Letters

Politeness and Politics in Cicero's Letters


Politics and Society in Ancient Greece

Politics and Society in Ancient Greece


The Politics of Munificence in the Roman Empire : Citizens, Elites and Benefactors in Asia Minor

The Politics of Munificence in the Roman Empire : Citizens, Elites and Benefactors in Asia Minor


Pompeii : the Life of a Roman Town

Pompeii : the Life of a Roman Town


Pompeii : the Living City

Pompeii : the Living City


Popular Culture in Ancient Rome

Popular Culture in Ancient Rome


Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire

Popular Morality in the Early Roman Empire


Pots & Plays : Interactions Between Tragedy and Greek Vase-Painting of the Fourth Century B.C.

Pots & Plays : Interactions Between Tragedy and Greek Vase-Painting of the Fourth Century B.C.


Power and Eroticism in Imperial Rome

Power and Eroticism in Imperial Rome


Reading Homer : Film and Text

Reading Homer : Film and Text


Reading Roman Comedy : Poetics and Playfulness in Plautus and Terence

Reading Roman Comedy : Poetics and Playfulness in Plautus and Terence


Recognizing Persius

Recognizing Persius


Reflections of Romanity : discourses of subjectivity in Imperial Rome

Reflections of Romanity : discourses of subjectivity in Imperial Rome


Remembering the Roman People : Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature

Remembering the Roman People : Essays on Late-Republican Politics and Literature


Rhetorical Exercises From Late Antiquity : a Translation of Choricius of Gaza's Preliminary Talks and Declamations

Rhetorical Exercises From Late Antiquity : a Translation of Choricius of Gaza's Preliminary Talks and Declamations


The Roman Amphitheatre : From Its Origins to the Colosseum

The Roman Amphitheatre : From Its Origins to the Colosseum


The Roman Clan : the Gens From Ancient Ideology to Modern Anthropology

The Roman Clan : the Gens From Ancient Ideology to Modern Anthropology


Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture

Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture


Roman Eyes : Visuality & Subjectivity in Art & Text

Roman Eyes : Visuality & Subjectivity in Art & Text


Roman Manliness : Virtus and the Roman Republic

Roman Manliness : Virtus and the Roman Republic


Roman Republics

Roman Republics


The Roman Triumph

The Roman Triumph


The Roman wedding : ritual and meaning in antiquity

Roman Religion and the Cult of Diana at Aricia


The Romans in the age of Augustus

The Romans in the age of Augustus


Rome and the Nomads : the Pontic-Danubian Realm in Antiquity

Rome and the Nomads : the Pontic-Danubian Realm in Antiquity


Rome : Day One

Rome : Day One


Rome : Empire of the Eagles

Rome : Empire of the Eagles


Rome's Cultural Revolution

Rome's Cultural Revolution


Rome's Gothic Wars : From the Third Century to Alaric

Rome's Gothic Wars : From the Third Century to Alaric


The Ruin of the Roman Empire

The Ruin of the Roman Empire


Book Covers, S-Z


Saints and church spaces in the late antique Mediterranean : architecture, cult, and community

Saints and church spaces in the late antique Mediterranean : architecture, cult, and community


The Satires of Horace

The Satires of Horace


Scipio Africanus : Rome's Greatest General

Scipio Africanus : Rome's Greatest General


Secrets of Pompeii : Everyday Life in Ancient Rome

Secrets of Pompeii : Everyday Life in Ancient Rome


The Seer in Ancient Greece

The Seer in Ancient Greece


Seneca and The Idea of Tragedy

Seneca and The Idea of Tragedy


Sex and Sensuality in the Ancient World

Sex and Sensuality in the Ancient World


Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome

Sexual Morality in Ancient Rome


Slavery in the Roman World

Slavery in the Roman World


Song of Wrath : the Peloponnesian War Begins

Song of Wrath : the Peloponnesian War Begins


Sophocles : Oedipus Tyrannus

Sophocles : Oedipus Tyrannus


The Spartacus War

The Spartacus War


Spartans : A New History

Spartans : A New History


The Splendor of Roman Wall Painting

The Splendor of Roman Wall Painting


Storm Before the Storm : The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

Storm Before the Storm : The Beginning of the End of the Roman Republic

 


Style and Function in Roman Decoration : Living With Objects and Interiors

Style and Function in Roman Decoration : Living With Objects and Interiors


The Theban plays : Oedipus the king, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone

The Theban plays : Oedipus the king, Oedipus at Colonus, Antigone


The Theme of Returning Home in Ancient Greek Literature : the Nostos of the Epic Heroes

The Theme of Returning Home in Ancient Greek Literature : the Nostos of the Epic Heroesrs


Thermopylae : the Battle That Changed the World

Thermopylae : the Battle That Changed the World


Thucydides

Thucydides


Thucydides : the Reinvention of History

Thucydides : the Reinvention of History


Translating Rome

Translating Rome


Travelling Heroes : in the Epic Age of Homer

Travelling Heroes : in the Epic Age of Homer


Two Romes : Rome and Constantinople in late antiquity

Two Romes : Rome and Constantinople in late antiquity


The Unknown Odysseus : Alternate Worlds in Homer's Odyssey

The Unknown Odysseus : Alternate Worlds in Homer's Odyssey


The Vandals

The Vandals


Villa of theBirds : the Excavation and Preservation of the Kom al-Dikka Mosaics

Villa of theBirds : the Excavation and Preservation of the Kom al-Dikka Mosaics


The War That Killed Achilles : the True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War

The War That Killed Achilles : the True Story of Homer's Iliad and the Trojan War


Warfare in the Ancient World : From the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome

Warfare in the Ancient World : From the Bronze Age to the Fall of Rome


Water for the City, Fountains for the People : Monumental Fountains in the Roman Eas. an archaeological study of water management

Water for the City, Fountains for the People : Monumental Fountains in the Roman Eas. an archaeological study of water management


The Way of Herodotus : Travels With the Man Who Invented History

The Way of Herodotus : Travels With the Man Who Invented History


Why We're All Romans : the Roman Contribution to the Western World

Why We're All Romans : the Roman Contribution to the Western World


A World History of Ancient Political Thought

A World History of Ancient Political Thought


Ajax carrying the body of Achilles. Attic black-figure lekythos, ca. 510 BC. From Sicily. Housed at Staatliche Antikensammlungen, Munich, Germany

Greek Hoplites in Battle; Amphora, ca. 530 B.C.; Archaic; black-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art  Warfare in Ancient Greece.

Greek Warriors; Kylix, ca. 540–530 B.C.; black-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Warfare in Ancient Greece.

Foot Race; Panathenaic amphora, ca. 530 B.C.; Archaic

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Athletics in Ancient Greece.

Practicing With Javelin in a Gymnasium; Psykter, ca. 520–510 B.C.; red-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Athletics in Ancient Greece.

Greek Chariot; Neck-amphora, ca. 540 B.C.; Archaic; black-figure

 

 

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Music in Ancient Greece.

Greeks on Horseback; Column-krater (bowl for mixing wine and water), Classical, ca. 430 B.C., red-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art The Art of Classical Greece.

Kylix (drinking cup) depicting the birth of Athena (Αθήνα). 550BC. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

For more details and better quality image, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Flickr.

Drinking Party Procession; Column-krater, ca. 550 B.C.; black-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Music in Ancient Greece.

Greek Musician or Storyteller with Kithara; Amphora, ca. 490 b.c.; Classical; red-figure

For more information, visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art Music in Ancient Greece.

Michigan State University