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Music Manuscripts; Facsimiles; Paleography; Printing: Home

Highlights include headings and sources for music manuscripts, early printed music, music notation, music printing and related topics.

General headings

This guide is presented to highlight some of the headings relating to manuscript and/or early printed books and music in the MSU Libraries. Although it covers several topics, all are related to the physical presentation of music through the centuries.

Music manuscripts and facsimiles are scattered throughout the Fine Arts--Music Collections, with a few in Special Collections. The paragraphs below list the Library of Congress subject headings normally used and describe what is encompassed by each term. Geographic and other subdivisions under the main headings may also be used. To use these headings, type them in Magic as "Library of Congress Subject Headings".

Music -- Manuscripts
This subject heading will lead to actual manuscripts, books about manuscripts or early printed material, and a few reproductions of early books or music.

Music - Manuscripts - Facsimiles
This heading, the largest of the listings under "Music-Manuscripts", is used for exact reproductions of scores and books [i.e. facsimiles] and for books about facsimiles.

Paleography, Musical
This heading leads to material on the act of writing music, usually in historic context and concerned almost exclusively with hand-written notation.

Musical notation
This takes a broad view of notation, whether by hand, any form of printing, computerization, or reproduction, and the more modern evolution of music writing. Although less closely related to manuscript, facsimile or paleographic topics, there can be overlap with those subject areas.

Music printing
Topics here include everything from the earliest music printing to the latest computerized notation.

Overview of headings

This guide is presented to highlight some of the headings relating to manuscript and/or early printed books and music in the MSU Libraries. Although it covers several topics, all are related to the physical presentation of music through the centuries.

Music manuscripts and facsimiles are scattered throughout the Fine Arts--Music Collections, with a few in Special Collections. The paragraphs below list the Library of Congress subject headings normally used and describe what is encompassed by each term. Geographic and other subdivisions under the main headings may also be used. To use these headings, type them as "Library of Congress Subject Headings".

Music -- Manuscripts
This subject heading will lead to actual manuscripts, books about manuscripts or early printed material, and a few reproductions of early books or music.

Music - Manuscripts - Facsimiles
This heading, the largest of the listings under "Music-Manuscripts", is used for exact reproductions of scores and books [i.e. facsimiles] and for books about facsimiles.

Paleography, Musical
This heading leads to material on the act of writing music, usually in historic context and concerned almost exclusively with hand-written notation.

Musical notation
This takes a broad view of notation, whether by hand, any form of printing, computerization, or reproduction, and the more modern evolution of music writing. Although less closely related to manuscript, facsimile or paleographic topics, there can be overlap with those subject areas.

Music printing
Topics here include everything from the earliest music printing to the latest computerized notation.

Facsimiles


There are two main types of facsimiles, those of historic origin and those of modern compositions. The historic facsimiles are often found in collections and complete works; some are issued individually. If issued separately, they usually are found in the ML 96 category. ML96.4 includes facsimiles of more than one work by one composer or works of more than one composer; ML96.5 is used for facsimiles of one work by one composer.

If the facsimile is of a specific composer's works, there will usually a heading for "Music-Manuscripts-Facsimiles" as described above. In addition, a heading for the composer's name will be followed by the subdivision "Manuscripts-Facsimiles".
For example, the facsimile of Bach's Brandenburg Concertos includes the subject headings: "Bach, Johann Sebastian, 1685-1750-Manuscripts-Facsimiles" and "Music-Manuscripts-Facsimiles". For works of more than one composer, there is usually a heading for the type of music in addition to the facsimile heading, e.g. "Gregorian chant" or "Chorale preludes".

Modern composers' works are often issued in reproduction of the manuscript, rather than being typeset by any means. If it is certain the manuscript is the composer's own notation, the usual pair of headings will be used as outlined above. If the notation is not certain to be that of the composer, there may be no heading or just the "Music-Manuscripts-Facsimile" heading. These scores are typically shelved with the normal call numbers because they serve as the performance material. Generally, there will be a note in the catalog record to say "Reproduced from manuscript" or "Reproduced from holograph", to indicate the music is not in printed form. As more and more composers move to composition or reproduction in various computer programs, this cataloging distinction and subject heading designation will be used less frequently. However, any music that is hand-written from any era is likely to continue to use these headings.

Source material/research

SOURCE MATERIAL/RESEARCH:
A few examples of resource material pertaining to music manuscripts are given here. These are just a sample, and almost all include additional bibliographic or other references for related material. All are in stacks unless otherwise noted.

New Grove Dictionary of Music,2nd edition (2000), v.23, Music Permanent Reserve. Article: "Sources, MS"; also includes references to other articles.

Also available online as Oxford Music Online; from the library webpage (http://www.lib.msu.edu),select "Electronic resources", then type "Oxford music online" and select "Grove Dictionary of Music".

New Grove Dictionary of Music, 1990 edition, v.17, Music Reference. Article: "Sources, MS".

Hughes, Andrew. Medieval manuscripts for mass and office (1995). Main BV 185 .H83 1995 (the 1982 edition is in Fine Arts-Art reference)

Articles in NOTES (ML 27.U5 M695, Fine Arts Journal Room):
Ford, Terence. Index to the facsimiles of polyphonic music before 1600 published in Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart (MGG) In: NOTES, v.39, 1983, p.283-315 (refers to first edition of MGG)

Coover, James. Composite manuscripts in facsimile. In: NOTES, v.38, 1981, p.271-295.

Abravanel, Claud. A checklist of music manuscripts in facsimile edition. In: NOTES, v.34, 1978, p.557-570.

Coover, James. Music Manuscripts in facsimile editions: supplement. In: NOTES, v.37, 1981, p.533-556. [update to Abravanel article]


Examples of music manuscripts and early theoretical works in Fine Arts--Music:
M 1999.M6 Monumenta monodica medii aevi.

ML 96.4 .W5 Musical autographs from Monteverdi to Hindemith [sample signatures, some brief notation examples)

M 2.P95 Publications of mediaeval musical manuscripts.

M 2.M588 Monuments of music and music literature in facsimile. First series, Music. (28 volumes) [reproductions of music manuscripts, mostly mid-1500s-late 1700s]

M 2.M5882 Monuments of music and music literature in facsimile. Second series, Music literature (141 volumes) [reproductions of theoretical and historical writing about music, mostly mid-1500s-late 1700s]

M 2089 .M24 Magnus Liber Organi [ask at Fine Arts Reference Desk; in Music Reference PR1]

ML 96.5 .B186 BWV282 Bach, J.S. B minor mass.

ML 96.5 .M976 K.626. Mozart, W.A. Requiem [in Special Collections]

ML 96.5 .S87 V3 Stravinsky, I. Vesna sviashchennaia (Rite of spring) [in Special Collections]

ML 96.5 .S87 Z5 Stravinsky, I. Zhar-ptitsa (Firebird) [in Special Collections]

For indexes to locations of manuscripts and early printed sources in libraries around the world, see RISM A and B, Music Journal Reference ML 113.I63 and ML 113.I64. [RISM=Repertoire international des sources musicales; otherwise known as International inventory of musical sources]

Music manuscripts

MANUSCRIPTS:
MSU has some original manuscripts. The most important early manuscript is the 13th-14th Century Antiphonale; it is kept in Special Collections. The subject heading "Music-Manuscripts" is used, along with headings for antiphonaries and the Catholic Church. The complete catalog record can be found under "other" call numbers, MSS 269.

Manuscripts of MSU-related composers and perfomers were formerly housed in the Special Collections division of the MSU Libraries.  Those for which the indexing is complete are now moved to the MSU Archvives and Historical Collections, in Conrad Hall.  Reference to them can be found within the Archives website, or by searching the Music Manuscript Collection entry on the Fine Arts--Music home page.  Many of these are works-in-progress; as new materials are added, the finding lists are updated.  Most of these collections will be given subject entries for the individual's or group's name followed by the word "Archives", e.g. "Reed, H. Owen, 1910-2014 --Archives"; "Verdehr Trio --Archives". These are all given archival numbers rather than normal call numbers. For more information, contact University Archives and Historical Collections (http://archives.msu.edu/) or Mary Black Junttonen, MSU music librarian.

Remember also that the heading "Music-Manuscripts" refers to material about manuscripts, not just manuscripts themselves. An example of this use is:
ML 410 .M9 T95 1987. Tyson, Alan. Mozart : studies of the autograph scores.

Paleography, Musical


This refers primarily to early forms of music writing; much of the material is on Byzantine and early Roman Catholic manuscripts. However, some titles cover the span of centuries and give practical help in deciphering music of the past.

Search New Grove (in paper) or Oxford Music Online (Grove Dictionary) for articles on "Paleography" and related topics.

Specific titles:
ML 170 .M84 2004 Music and medieval manuscripts : paleography and performance.
(also has a subject heading "Manuscripts, Medieval")

M 2.P6 M8 The musical notation of the middle ages exemplified by facsimiles of manuscripts written between the tenth and sixteenth centuries…

Folio ML 170.T74 1999 The treasury of Petrus Alamire : music and art in Flemish court manuscripts, 1500-1535.

ML 3797.1 .D37 1998 Design and production in medieval and early modern Europe.

Musical notation

This heading and its subdivisions cover the art of music wirting regardless of time, place or technology.

Specific titles to be found under this heading include:
MT 35.H29 1984 Harder, Paul O. Music manuscript techniques.

MT 39 .P69 2002 Powell, Steven. Music engraving today : the art and practice of digital notesetting.

MT 35 .F88 1990 Fundamentals of music [electronic resource] - located in Software Collection (Digital Media Center)

M2.R23 v.44  Writing American Indian music: historic transcriptions, notations and arrangements.

ML348.E46 1997  El-Mallah, Issam.  Arab music and musical notation.

 

 

Music printing

Related to the broader topic because of the importance of early printed music, this heading includes a wide range of material, not limited to but with considerable emphasis on the early printing (incunabula) of music.

Examples:
ML 112 .K74 Krieder, J. Evan. The printing of music 1480-1680.

ML 112. K78 E5  Krummel, Donald.  English music printing, 1553-1700.

ML 141.T6 M72 1981  Barksdale, A. Beverly.  The printed note: 500 years of music printing and engraving.

 

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